Creative Writing

MFA Course Descriptions Archive

 

Spring 2021

CRW 524-800 and -804: ECOTONE LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS BELL AL
[Permission of instructor required; please write to Anna Lena Phillips Bell.]
Ecotone’s section editors take CRW 524-800, which involves contributing to weekly editorial meetings and managing digital and print submissions for a given genre: reading manuscripts, assigning work to readers, reviewing comments, recommending work for discussion by the team, leading discussions of work, and ensuring that submission responses are sent. Section editors also solicit work from new writers, work closely with the editor to learn the craft of writing editorial correspondence and drafting edits, contribute ideas for special features and issue themes, and help create and implement promotion plans for the magazine. This spring we will focus on substantive editing at the line level. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition; The Copyeditor’s Handbook, 4th edition; and The Copyeditor’s Workbook. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit. In spring 2021, applications will be accepted for two editorial positions with the magazine. Students interested in applying must have taken the three-credit practicum course.
CRW 524-804 (one credit) is a new spring-semester course for those who have taken the Ecotone practicum and would like to continue as part of the magazine’s editorial staff. This spring we will read submissions for our spring and fall 2021 issues, and complete one to two fact checks. This course is for the most part asynchronous, but will include three meetings with the full editorial team to discuss work for consideration for the magazine.

CRW 524-801, -802, -803: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL, GERARD P
(1-3 credit hours)
W 3:30-6:15 PM
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Graduate students will be assigned to a group for the semester. Each will work as a group leader setting the agenda for 4-week modules and mentoring undergraduate students. The groups will focus rotate focus points addressing editing, sales/marketing, and art/design.

CRW 525-800: THE DEBUT BOOK, ELLIS FLEMING, K
What is it that makes certain debut books so noteworthy? What sets certain authors and stories apart, entitling them to a wide readership? Do they have superior artistry and vision? Better craft and technique? Or does it all come down to having a great publisher and a killer marketing plan? And what roles do industry diversity and inclusivity (or the lack thereof) play in whether a book makes a splash?
In this advanced special topics course, you'll study debut works of fiction and nonfiction from a diverse roster of acclaimed authors, not only examining their prose styles, their chosen subject matter, and the ways they employ narrative voice but also considering specific questions relevant to each author’s body of work and how these relate to the critical reception of their first published book. You will become familiar with current literary trends and develop the skills to assess contemporary works of literature with the mind of a reader, writer, and editor, and relate those analyses to the professional context of publishing, e.g. author-agent and author-editor relationships, the book deal, marketing and publicity, and inherent industry biases, etc. 

CRW 542-800: POETRY WORKSHOP, CROWE M
This course combines investigation of the political/personal dichotomy in American poetry with a workshop of student poems. We’ll read a diverse group of modern and contemporary poets and consider whether their work falls into one or the other “camp” or straddles the line productively/provocatively or perhaps avoids/rejects classification altogether. We’ll also read essays by poets who address, more or less directly, questions like, “What is the poet’s obligation to history, to the current social and political landscape, to the future?” and “What kind of poetry has the greatest potential impact on readers, on the world?” Students will explore their own personal and political and formal aims in workshop, in class discussions, and in short reflective prose writing assignments. Finally, each student will produce a portfolio of polished poems and a manifesto in which s/he tries to answer some of the course’s central questions, making a particular argument about how poetry matters. 

CRW 542-801 POETRY WORKSHOP—POET AS TRANSLATOR, MÖRLING, M
Octavio Paz said: “Translation is an art of analogy, the art of finding correspondences. An art of shadows and echoes…” Charles Baudelaire said that poetry is essentially analogy. The idea of universal correspondence comes from the idea that language is a micro cosmos, a double of the universe. Between the language of the universe and the universe of language, there is a bridge, a link: poetry. The poet, says Baudelaire, is the translator.”
In this class we will study multiple translations of single poems, examine the choices and strategies of translation. In addition, each student in the class will also provide weekly contributions of their own translation of given poems. These translations will serve as focal points for the larger subject of translation, that of the poet as translator. Readings will include selections from Swedish, German, French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Eastern European, Spanish and South American poets. Knowledge of a second language is welcome but not necessary.

CRW 543-001: FORMS OF POETRY, COX M

CRW 544-800: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, LEE R
This course will function as a traditional workshop (over zoom!) Strong emphasis on constructing scene and narrative.   Workshop will endeavor to find doors unopened in the text-- doors into the future, and the past, into themes untapped, and dimensions of character not yet discovered. 

CRW 545-800: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, BRENNER, W
This reading and discussion course (elective, not workshop) is open to MFA students in all genres. Its unspoken subtitle is “Writing About People.” We’ll examine story-telling methods, craft choices, and effects in some recent creative nonfiction and documentary films, thinking always about how to tell someone’s story, how to tell the truth, including our own. Book list will include the following: Ayiti and Hunger (Roxane Gay), Inscriptions for Headstones (Matthew Vollmer), Truth & Beauty: A Friendship (Ann Patchett), Autobiography of a Face (Lucy Grealy), Working (Studs Terkel), The Corpse Walker (Liao Yiwu), Edie: An American Girl (Jean Stein and George Plimpton), and 99 Stories of God (Joy Williams). Films will likely include The Eyes of Tammy Faye, Capturing the Friedmans, and short films by director Errol Morris. Students may write occasional short creative exercises copying forms. One personal response essay due at semester’s end.   

CRW 548-001: WORKSHOP LONGFORM NARRATIVE II, DE GRAMONT
In the second semester of a year-long class, students will continue working on novels and memoir in a workshop format.  

CRW 550-800: WORKSHOP CREATIVE NONFICTION, WHITE M
Unclassified Writing Workshop. We’ll read and discuss state-of-the-art books from authors like Claudia Rankine, Maggie Nelson, Leslie Jamison, Carmen Machado, and Jenn Shapland. We’ll consider hybridity and literary forms that cross the borders of memoir, fiction, journalism, poetry, art, film, criticism, etcetera. Writing assignments will focus on developing short- and long-form work that might be out-of-genre, between-genre, or in some unclassifiable genre; workshopping will be of the fairly traditional peer-review type. You’ll have regular conferences with me. 

CRW 550-008: CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP, MOEZZI M
In this course, students will write, read, revise, and critique their own creative nonfiction (CNF). Think personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, criticism, profile, and/or opinion, nature, travel, lyrical, political, observational, argumentative and descriptive writing, varied combinations of these, and more. By the end of this semester, students will have written at least one work of highly polished, original CNF that is ready to submit for publication.

CRW 560-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH EMILY
[Please write the instructor for permission to enroll.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of the department’s award-winning publishing house, Lookout Books (lookout.org). This practical course functions primarily as a robust, hands-on internship at an independent press and provides real-world experience in everything from evaluating manuscripts to copyediting and fact checking, from designing book interiors and pitching cover concepts to developing marketing and publicity plans in support of the imprint’s forthcoming titles. The Lookout experience will prove valuable for students interested in furthering their understanding of literary publishing, whether they want to enter the industry or learn about it toward their aspirations as authors. Former students have gone on to careers in editing and publishing at HarperCollins, Graywolf, W. W. Norton, Hub City Press, Orion, and Southern Humanities Review, among many others. Practicum students work approximately 8 hours weekly--from home or in the Publishing Lab as needed (including a 2-hour Zoom meeting)--under faculty supervision. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit. Taking the course over two semesters is recommended to experience the complete lifecycle of a book.]

CRW 580-001: EATING OUR WORLD, DASGUPTA S
“Whether or not we spend time in a kitchen, whether or not we even care what’s on the plate, we have a relationship with food that’s launched when we’re born and lasts until we die. Cooking, eating, feeding others, resisting or ignoring food—it all runs deep, so deep that we may not even notice the way it helps to define us.” – Laura Shapiro
The goal of this course is to improve students’ reading, analysis, and writing of creative nonfiction by focusing on food. Each book will be paired with a matching, short writing assignment. At the end of the semester, students will give presentations on how they would want to craft their own food memoirs incorporating stylistic devices they have learned from the books read in this class. Overall, the purpose of this course is to invite students to examine (and apply) food as a lens to write about everyday life practices. These include production, commodification, and consumption and also identity formation through norms of family life, community, nationality, gender, sexuality, race, and ethnicity.  

CRW 580-800: SPECIAL TOPICS CREATIVE WRITING, SIEGEL R
"The Real Unreal: Autofiction, the Japanese I-Novel, and the Interplay of Memoir and Fiction." This course will look at some of the ways that fiction has drawn on memoir over the years--gaining vitality, increasing the illusion of intimacy, and drawing inside itself that most disturbing of conversations: What is real here, and why does it matter? Readings will include a number of examples of contemporary autofiction; examples of the Japanese I-novel, which predates and in many ways presages autofiction; relevant examples of memoir, journal, and other forms of autobiographical writing; and of course some reality TV, as needed. Authors discussed might possibly include Ben Lerner, Sheila Heti, Tao Lin, Marguerite Duras, and Mishima Yukio.

CRW 580-801: WRITING FOR THE PUBLIC GOOD, EDGERTON C
Students will be asked to write opinion editorials (op-eds), letters to the editor, as well as speeches to be presented to public bodies. Students will select topics they are interested in and will seek publication. There will be workshopping and discussion in small groups. Emphasis will be on clarity, conciseness, and accuracy of written and spoken material. Guest speakers will be chosen by the professor and/or students. The professor will use individualized instruction by phone and Zoom in order to counteract the absence of face-to-face instruction.

CRW 580-802: ECOPOETICS IN PRACTICE (SPECIAL TOPICS), PHILLIPS BELL A L
How can poets write in, with, and on behalf of the more-than-human world? Can poems help shift the balance in a time of continued ecological degradation and social injustice? Ecopoetics imagines ways of recognizing our kinship with plants, animals, ecosystems, weather, and each other, and ways of manifesting those kinships in writing. In this course we will consider how to place ourselves as poets in richly biodiverse landscapes marked by human creativity and human violence. We’ll reflect and present on a variety of poets, via course texts including A Literary Field Guide to Southern Appalachia and Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing within the Anthropocene. We’ll try out ecopoetical experiments and strategies, and investigate questions at the intersections of environmental and social justice that might inform our own work’s ongoing concerns. We’ll use this research to shape brief poetic sequences or projects, and will help refine each other’s poems in workshop. We will consider as well how ecopoetics may manifest in hybrid-genre work, prose, and other forms. Class meetings will take place online; we will also undertake writing expeditions to various locales, and will confer about how best to safely carry these out. Through exploring existing and invented poetic constraints, strategies for decentering the I, and the possibilities and limitations of the lyric, narrative, and other modes, we will make vital work from the debris of the Anthropocene.

 

Fall 2020

CRW 503-001: CREATIVE WRITING PEDAGOGY, BRENNER W
This course doubles as pedagogy seminar and the weekly staff meeting for new teaching assistants (GTA and DIS) teaching CRW 201. The course provides you with a wealth of materials and resources for your teaching career here at UNCW and beyond. Class meetings serve as a forum in which to share and address your ongoing teaching experiences, questions, successes, and challenges. Occasional guest speakers will include experienced TAs and professors. We will also read and discuss a range of articles about pedagogical theory and methods, with an eye toward developing your own teaching philosophy and methodology. You will write one personal essay at semester's end, reflecting on both your 201 experience and your ideas for future classes.

CRW 523-001: BOOKBUILDING, RAMOS M
For students interested in the basics, this course offers intensive hands-on training in book design and production using desktop publishing software in a Macintosh lab. Students develop skills through a progressively more complex series of design projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work, in a small edition. Students should gain from this course basic software skills, a heightened design aesthetic, an understanding of how books are produced, manuscript to bookshelf, and an overview of small press publishing. The course meets for three hours a week, but students should allow ample additional time to complete assignments in the Publishing Lab outside of class hours.

CRW 524-002 (2) and -003 (3) Ecotone LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS BELL A L
[Permission of instructor required. Please write Anna Lena Phillips Bell for permission to register.]
CRW 524-003 (three credits): Ecotone practicum. This is a practical course in the publication of Ecotone, the award-winning national literary magazine of place. The coursework consists of reading submissions and working as part of an editorial team to help bring out an issue of the magazine. Each practicum member is responsible for reading and commenting on a number of manuscripts each week. Ecotone staff members will also fact-check work for upcoming issues, draft run order, write front-matter copy, and proofread. Other work may include promotion planning and implementation as well as event planning. We will set aside time at least once during the semester to think about the process of sending out work to literary magazines. In addition, we will read widely, both to cultivate an understanding of Ecotone’s aesthetic and where it sits in the literary landscape, and to find new voices the magazine might publish. Practicum members will read and review one past issue of Ecotone, and will subscribe to two print literary magazines and follow one online, choosing one to review. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. Recommended text: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit, space permitting.
In 2020–2021, CRW524-003 will be offered in fall but not in spring. In spring 2021, applications will be accepted for the positions of poetry editor and nonfiction editor. Students interested in applying must have taken the three-credit practicum course.
CRW 524-002: Ecotone practicum for section editors. Ecotone’s section editors manage digital and print submissions for a given genre—reading manuscripts, assigning work to readers, reviewing readers’ comments, recommending work for discussion by the team, leading discussions of work, and ensuring that submission responses are sent. Section editors also solicit work from new writers; work closely with the editor to learn the craft of drafting editorial correspondence and marking edits; contribute ideas for special features and issue themes; and help draft and implement promotion plans for the magazine. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit. CRW524-002 is offered each semester. In spring 2021, applications will be accepted for the positions of poetry editor and nonfiction editor. Students interested in applying must have taken the three-credit practicum course.

CRW 524-004 (1), -005 (2), and -006 (3): Chautauqua LITERARY MAGAZINE, GERARD J
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on a developmental editing projects, assist and participate in design process, and act as team leaders, mentoring undergraduate students. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. Students work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work.
Course may be repeated for credit. Variable credit (1 to 3 hours) possible for graduate students.

CRW 540-001: WRITERS’ WEEK SYMPOSIUM, SMITH E
This one-credit intensive course is designed to complement the department’s annual Writers’ Week. In celebration of Lookout Books’ tenth anniversary and Ecotone magazine’s fifteenth, this year’s symposium will highlight the art of publishing, featuring publishers, editors, and authors of national distinction, including UNCW alumni who have gone on to found or lead vital publishing initiatives. Much of the work will be practical and will focus on organizing, publicizing, and realizing a week of events consisting of readings, presentations, panels, and possibly a book fair. During class meetings, we’ll familiarize ourselves with the work of our visitors, as well discuss the art and ethics of festival planning and literary stewardship. As a group, we will be responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in everything from introducing speakers at events to driving them around town. Each student in the class will also benefit from an individual manuscript conference with one of the visiting writers, editors, or agents who will be in residence. Students are expected to attend a total of 10 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, COX M
Though it is essentially a craft-oriented workshop wherein poets will critique and encourage each other's work, I am also planning to make room for a number of in-class revision exercises or presentations.  I will tailor these exercises in process and revision to the group’s needs. I will provide individualized reading lists.  Student products will include a portfolio of eight finished poems, plus revision drafts. The journal will consist of:  a) responses to reading assignments in modern and contemporary poetry and poetics, including an anthology of twelve contemporary women poets; b) weekly reflections; and c) extensive exploration of a craft concept of your choice.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, MÖRLING M
Jorge Luis Borges once said: "poetry is expressed in words, but words are not the substance of poetry…The substance of poetry-if I may use a metaphor-is emotion." In this poetry workshop we will focus on the ever-evolving process of our writing and address the emotional nature of our poems. How do we write a poem that deeply engages the reader? We will also discuss different ways of analyzing a poem and how to listen with an open mind and heart to a critique of your own work. In addition, we will focus on the process of revision and discuss the many approaches and ways to revise a poem. Is it possible for instance, to approach a revision the way one would a translation? How do you transform a poem without destroying its urgency and original spirit? How do you arrive at a poem in its ultimate and inevitable form? Everyone is required to submit a raw and freshly written poem every, or every other week. The aim of this class is also for us to learn to become comfortable bringing in poems that are still rough without making excuses for them.

CRW 543-001: FORMS OF POETRY, CROWE M
What does form do? If we think of poetic form as encompassing all those elements of craft that show control—the poet’s command over the visual and sonic unfolding of the poem—we might speculate that form conveys authority, that perhaps its primary purpose is to convince readers that the poem is carefully made and therefore has something wise or beautiful or otherwise useful to say. In this class, we’ll explore the notion that form—the careful, deliberate, artful crafting of a poem—is the primary means by which poets convince readers to pay the kind of fine attention necessary for poetry to do its full magic. (Of course, we might also argue that form is the magic!) We’ll read a diverse range of modern and contemporary poets, those writing in free-verse and received forms, as we investigate the relationship between what a poet says and how they say it, between voice and structure—and we’ll try out some fancy tricks of our own.

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, SIEGEL R
A workshop focused on the reading and discussion of participants’ work. Equal emphasis will be placed on matters of craft and process.  MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP (1CR), VISITING WRITER TONI JENSEN
4-week workshop: Friday 9/4, 9/11, 9/18 and 9/25 (1pm-3:45pm)

Instruction in writing fiction, with classroom critique of students’ work and work by professionals. Includes study of publishing markets. M.F.A. students may repeat for credit up to twenty-one hours.

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, MOEZZI M
In this course, we will read, discuss, and critique a wide variety of creative nonfiction (CNF), and we will do as writers. The course will focus on the readings, and how they can inspire and instruct us as writers. The hope is to learn from and be inspired by the readings (including some that students will bring in themselves) without being so unduly limited and influenced by them that students abandon their own unique creative signatures. By the end of the semester, students should have a better grasp of CNF in general, as well as at least one piece of CNF that is either ready or nearly ready for submission and/or publication.

CRW 546-001: WORKSHOP WRITING THE LONGFORM NARRATIVE, DE GRAMONT M
This is the first semester of a year-long class, ideally followed in the spring by CRW 548. Producing a book length manuscript is an endurance process; in addition to imagination you need determination, flexibility, and encouragement. This class will aim to be a place where all these things and more can be found. One-on-one support in the form of meetings and personalized reading lists will be provided. In class we will workshop chapters and scenes, as well as discuss your book’s plot, characters, theme, and structure. We will also perform in class exercises geared toward revision and rethinking, and working through whatever might stand in the way of your book’s completion.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION, LEE R
Craft-based instruction in specific formal issues in the tradition of fiction. Assignments will include original fiction, extensive reading, and may also include writing critiques, papers, exercise, etc. May be repeated once for credit (course may be taken multiple times for a maximum of 6 credit hours).

CRW 550-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP, DASGUPTA S
The goal of this rigorous course will be to generate and workshop a wide variety of essays by using the anthology Contemporary Creative Nonfiction, edited by Debra Monroe (ISBN 9781524980092), as the guide. Students will attempt essay forms such as hermit crab, braided, lyric, flash, as well as others borrowed from literary traditions present outside American literature. Workshops will be held in small groups, and students will be expected to meet with the professor for individual conferences at least twice during the semester.

CRW 550-002: CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP, GERARD P
Instruction in writing essays, articles, and/or memoirs, with classroom critique of students’ work and work by professionals. Includes study of publishing markets. M.F.A. students may repeat for credit up to twenty-one hours.

CRW 560-001, 002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E
[Permission of instructor required.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of the department’s unique, award-winning publishing house, Lookout Books (lookout.org). This practical course functions primarily as a robust, hands-on internship at an independent press and provides real-world experience in everything from evaluating manuscripts to copyediting and fact checking, from designing interiors and pitching cover concepts to developing creative marketing and publicity plans in support of the imprint’s forthcoming titles. The Lookout experience will prove valuable and rewarding for students interested in furthering their understanding of literary publishing, whether they want to enter the industry and learn about it toward their own aspirations as authors. Former students have gone on to careers in publishing at HarperCollins, Graywolf, W. W. Norton, Hub City Press, Orion magazine, and Southern Humanities Review, among others. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: WRITING FROM PLACE IN THE AGE OF CLIMATE CHANGE, GESSNER D
The goal of this class is to give you some tools with which to write about the natural world, to think about climate change, and to hopefully create art out of these tools.
In the workshop we will explore the role that writing about places can play in creating essays. This is particularly urgent in a time when nature is under siege, and in our reading we will explore climate change and its impact on our world. Through the use of exercise and prompts, and through our reading and studying tools like journaling and interviewing, we will learn how to create writing about place that is vivid and visceral, not dry and abstract. The first step in saving a place is often awareness of those places, and writers can be crucial in creating this awareness.

CRW 580-802: OPEN LETTERS FOR RADICAL CHANGE, LOCKHART Z
In this course, we will focus on the literary power of the open letter. We will explore the elements of voice (personal expression, the taming and intentional insertion of one’s intersecting identities and experiences) and reflect on critical social analysis skills (purpose, argument, support, poetic and rhetorical devices). We will build three open letters as social-personal responses with calls for solutions to current social injustices. Students will be directed to reflect on the personal and political in full relief, without drowning in a pity party but working toward social change utilizing literary devices. Our primary readings will come from Radical Hope: Letters of Love and Dissent in Dangerous Times and The Soul of the Full-Length Manuscript: Turning Life’s Wounds into the Gift of Literary Fiction, Memoir or Poetry. We will also read social-personal response essays you discover through both popular venues like The Atlantic, lesser known venues like Hazlitt, and venues that you may know that are not on the popular radar screen. We will work in creative community through peer editing, group accountability, and group support. The goal is to hone effective creative writing skills as social justice response to social and racial disparities in health care, policing, distribution of wealth, and other topics that propel these tumultuous times. We will present and seek publication for our letters at the end of the course.

 

Spring 2020

CRW 524-001 (1cr), -002 (2cr), and -003 (3cr) ECOTONE LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS BELL A L
[Permission of instructor required. Please write Anna Lena Phillips Bell for permission to register.]
CRW 524-003 (three credits) provides practical experience in the work of making a literary magazine, and supports the publication of Ecotone, the award-winning national literary magazine of place. Each practicum member is responsible for reading and commenting on a number of manuscripts each week. Ecotone staff members also fact-check work for upcoming issues, write front-matter copy, draft the run order for our upcoming issue, and proofread. Other work may include promotion planning and implementation. We will set aside time at least once during the semester to think about the process of sending out work to literary magazines. In addition, we will read widely, both to cultivate an understanding of Ecotone’s aesthetic and where it sits in the literary landscape, and to find new voices the magazine might publish. Practicum members will read and review one past issue of Ecotone, and will subscribe to two print literary magazines and follow one online, choosing one to review. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. Recommended text: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.
CRW 524-001 and -002 are reserved for Ecotone’s section editors. These editorships entail a separate weekly meeting. Section editors manage digital and print submissions for a given genre—reading manuscripts, assigning work to readers, reviewing readers’ comments, recommending work for discussion by the team, leading discussions of work, and ensuring that submission responses are sent. Section editors also solicit work from new writers; work closely with the editor to learn the craft of writing editorial correspondence and marking edits; contribute ideas for special features and issue themes; and help draft and implement promotion plans for the magazine. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit. In spring 2020, applications will be accepted for the positions of fiction editor and managing editor. The latter position is a graduate assistantship open to students in their first year. Students interested in applying must have taken, or be currently enrolled in, the three-credit practicum course.

CRW 524-004 (1cr), -005 (2cr), and -006 (3cr): LITERARY MAGAZINE CHAUTAUQUA, GERARD J
This course is designed to give graduate students a practical magazine publishing experience. The primary work of the course is related to building the journal. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on editing and fact-checking, tackle marketing/sales issues, and provide leadership for an undergraduate team.
Opportunities exist for graduate students to explore and follow interests in publishing. Graduate students have the opportunity to work on developmental editing projects; written blog posts, press releases, and articles for Chautauqua Institution publications; design broadsides, bookmarks, and other marketing materials; help to plan a launch.
Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, COX M
Though it is essentially a craft-oriented workshop wherein poets will critique and encourage each other's work, I am also planning to make room for a number of in-class writing/revision exercises or presentations.  I will tailor these exercises in process and revision to the group’s needs. I will provide individualized reading lists.  Student products will include a portfolio of seven finished poems, plus revision drafts. The journal will consist of:  a) responses to reading assignments in modern and contemporary poetry and poetics; b) weekly reflections; and c) extensive exploration of a craft concept of your choice.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, CROWE M
In a form perhaps most essentially characterized by compression, what does it mean for poets to write at length? What kinds of storytelling, expansiveness of thought, or complexity of experience might be achieved or broached or sustained in longer poems? And how can such work cleave to standards of precision and concision, even as they extend beyond the standard one-pager? This course combines investigation of longer verse with a workshop of student poems. We’ll read as models a wide range of works “of length”—both free verse and formal approaches—by modern and contemporary poets. While we’ll workshop poems of all shapes and sizes, each student will compose and revise at least one multi-page poem during the course of the semester.

 

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, LEE R

 

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, GERARD P
Students will write an original scene and two complete pieces of original new fiction, either stories or novel chapters, and share manuscripts with their peers for written and oral critique. Using the readings as guides to storytelling technique, we will pay close attention to technical issues such as POV, story structure, tone, profluence, suspense, characterization, and narrative intelligence. Students are expected to present new work rather than revisions of formerly workshopped stories and chapters, unless the revisions have substantially changed the piece, or by prior permission of the instructor. The emphasis is on pushing each writer to dare new drafts, rather than to polish competent stories. Each member of the workshop provide each other with a written critique. In this critique, the first order of business is to notice what is going on: observe what the author is trying to do and how. Only then can we begin to make technical and aesthetic judgments about how to improve the piece in light of the author’s intention and the story’s inherent—and perhaps unrecognized—possibilities.

 

CRW 550-003 (1): FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, with Visiting Writer Kim Barnes
Fridays 1:00-3:45pm (2/21, 2/28, 3/20, 3/27)

 

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION—THE MACABRE, DASGUPTA S
The goal of this course is to improve students’ reading, writing, research, and analysis skills by examining a variety of books, essays, and short stories that fall under the broad umbrella of “horror.” We will read a variety of subgenres (psychological, supernatural, Gothic, true crime) and pay attention to narrative decisions (backstory, framing devices, primary and secondary conflicts, foreshadowing, etc.) to see how various storytelling techniques demonstrated in these works may be incorporated into our own writing, regardless of genre. Each book will be paired with a matching writing exercise, and there will be a final assignment at the end of the semester.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION—THE SHORT NOVEL, DE GRAMONT M
In this course we will read novels that are under 250 pages, and discuss and examine how the author constructed a complete and compelling world in such a brief span of words. Authors will include Jamaica Kinkaid, Kazuo Ishiguro, Colson Whitehead, and Ocean Vuong. Students will also outline and develop an idea for their own short novel.

CRW 548-001: WORKSHOP LONG FORM NARRATIVE II, EDGERTON C
This is the second semester of a two-semester course and our goal is to have a draft of a fiction or nonfiction book by end of this second semester. Timelines and due pages will be designed on an individual basis, but expect something in the line of 20 - 30 pages a month. Among potential class and individual activities--in addition to traditional and non-traditional workshopping of chapters, scenes, maps, outlines, etc.: 1) discussing plot, scenes, characters, and theme, 2) discussions of literary theory, 3) discussion of writing technique and craft, 4) discussions of readings (from among other books, Paris Review Interviews, Mystery and Manners, Civilization and Its Discontents), 5) dramatic reading of scenes and 6) development of an analysis and description of the writer’s esthetic.

CRW 550-001: WORKSHOP CREATIVE NONFICTION, MOEZZI M
In this course, students will write, read, revise, and critique their own creative nonfiction (CNF). Think personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, criticism, profile, and/or opinion, nature, travel, lyrical, political, observational, argumentative and descriptive writing, and so on. By the end of this semester, students will have written at least one work of original CNF that is ready to submit for publication.

CRW 550-002: WORKSHOP CREATIVE NONFICTION, WHITE M
I’d prefer to call this the Unclassified Writing Workshop. Our readings will consist of unclassifiable hybrid writing by Claudia Rankine, Maggie Nelson, Leslie Jamison, Sarah Broom, etc. Rankine’s breakthrough collection Citizen incorporates poetry, micro-memoir, film, and criticism in its unflinching study of race in America; for weeks it topped sales charts in poetry and nonfiction simultaneously. Similarly, Nelson works simultaneously in poetry, autobiography, theory; Jamison works simultaneously in memoir, journalism, criticism, etc. Our writing focus will be on unclassifiable hybrid writing, in both short- and long-forms. Workshopping will be of the fairly traditional, peer-review type.

CRW 560-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E
[Permission of instructor required.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of the department’s award-winning literary imprint Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). This practical course functions primarily as a robust, hands-on internship at an independent publisher and provides real-world experience in everything from evaluating manuscripts to fact checking, from pitching cover concepts to developing creative marketing and publicity plans in support of the imprint’s forthcoming titles. The Lookout experience will prove valuable and rewarding for students interested in furthering their understanding of literary publishing, whether they want to enter the industry and learn about it toward their own aspirations as authors. Former students have gone on to careers in publishing at Ecco, Graywolf, Hub City Press, W. W. Norton, Orion magazine, and Southern Humanities Review, among others. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: BORDER CROSSINGS: CONTEMPORARY TRAVEL WRITING, SIEGEL R
What is travel writing? How do we define it? Does travel have to be geographic, for example? Or can it be cultural or social—vertical, rather than horizontal? This course explores travel writing of the last thirty years, with particular interest in the way boundaries blur and aesthetic strategies multiply as the genre explodes outward in a globalizing world. Readings include fiction, nonfiction, and poetry by Ben Lerner, Nell Freudenberger, Jenny Xie, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and others. One creative project.

CRW 580-002: TOPIC: SUBVERSIVE WOMEN, BRENNER W
This is a reading and discussion course (elective, not workshop) open to MFA students in all genres, in which we’ll read works by women who subvert traditional literary narrative form and content in all sorts of fun and interesting ways. Although some texts we’ll read are implicitly political, our focus will be on other kinds of subversiveness: authors who break, bend, and/or ignore the rules of plot, character, genre, and so on. As always, we’ll think about how we might borrow various techniques for use in our own work, regardless of genre or sub-genre.
Book list: Confessions of a Pretty Lady (Sandra Bernhard), Two Serious Ladies (Jane Bowles), Fire Girl (Sayantani Dasgupta), The City Is a Rising Tide (Rebecca Lee), Eileen: A Novel (Ottessa Moshfegh), Oh! A Novel (Mary Robison), Valley of the Dolls (Jacqueline Susann), Ninety-Nine Stories of God (Joy Williams). We’ll also watch documentary films about playwright Lorraine Hansberry and televangelist Tammy Faye Bakker. Students will write occasional 1-page creative or response papers, and one longer response essay at semester’s end.

 

 

Fall 2019

CRW 503-001: CREATIVE WRITING PEDAGOGY, CROWE M
This seminar provides training in the method and practice of teaching creative writing in a university or college setting, and it functions as the weekly staff meeting for those serving as new teaching assistants (GTA and DIS) in CRW 201.
Together we’ll read and discuss pedagogical texts, evaluate creative writing textbooks and methodologies, and consider a wide range of “problems in teaching.” (Can creative writing be taught? Should it be graded? By what method? How best can we handle conflict in the classroom or respond to sensitive material in student writing?) We’ll engage together in a thoroughgoing examination of the conventional workshop model and locate or imagine alternative strategies for serving diverse learning/writing communities. Each student-teacher will keep a journal and write a number of short, informal responses throughout the semester, which will culminate in a polished Teaching Philosophy suitable for inclusion in a professional dossier.

CRW 523-001: BOOKBUILDING, STAFF 
For students interested in the basics, this course offers intensive hands-on training in book design and production using desktop publishing software in a Macintosh lab. Students develop skills through a progressively more complex series of design projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work, in a small edition. Students should gain from this course basic software skills, a heightened design aesthetic, an understanding of how books are produced, manuscript to bookshelf, and an overview of small press publishing. The course meets for three hours a week, but students should allow ample additional time to complete assignments in the Publishing Lab outside of class hours.

CRW 524-001 (1), -002 (2), and -003 (3) Ecotone LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS BELL A L
[Permission of instructor required. Please write Anna Lena Phillips Bell for permission to register.]
CRW 524-003 (three credits) is a practical course in the publication of Ecotone, the award-winning national literary magazine of place. The coursework consists of reading submissions and working as part of an editorial team to help bring out an issue of the magazine. Each practicum member is responsible for reading and commenting on a number of manuscripts each week. Ecotone staff members will also fact-check work for upcoming issues, draft the run order for the spring issue, write front-matter copy, and proof the issue. Other work may include promotion planning and implementation as well as event planning. We will set aside time at least once during the semester to think about the process of sending out work to literary magazines. In addition, we will read widely, both to cultivate an understanding of Ecotone’s aesthetic and where it sits in the literary landscape, and to find new voices the magazine might publish. Practicum members will read and review one past issue of Ecotone, and will subscribe to two print literary magazines and follow one online, choosing one to review. Reviews may be published on the Ecotone–Lookout Books blog. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. Recommended text: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.
CRW 524-001 and -002 are reserved for Ecotone’s section editors. These editorships entail a separate, one-hour weekly meeting. Section editors manage digital and print submissions for a given genre—reading manuscripts, assigning work to readers, reviewing readers’ comments, recommending work for discussion by the team, leading discussions of work, and ensuring that submission responses are sent. Section editors also solicit work from new writers; work closely with the editor to learn the craft of drafting editorial correspondence and marking edits; contribute ideas for special features and issue themes; and help draft and implement promotion plans for the magazine. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit. In spring 2020, applications will be accepted for the positions of fiction editor and managing editor. The latter position is a graduate assistantship open to students in their first year. Students interested in applying must have taken, or be currently enrolled in, the three-credit practicum course.

CRW 524-004 (1), -005 (2), and -006 (3): Chautauqua LITERARY MAGAZINE, GERARD J
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on a developmental editing projects, assist and participate in design process, and act as team leaders, mentoring undergraduate students. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. Students work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work.
Course may be repeated for credit. Variable credit (1 to 3 hours) possible for graduate students.

CRW 525-001: SPECIAL TOPIC IN PUBLISHING: BOOK MARKETING AND PUBLICITY
How is it that one book seems to be everywhere you look—reviewed in major newspapers, recommended by Oprah, nominated for awards, placed face-out on bookstore shelves, and styled beside a different frothy beverage every time you scroll Instagram—while another deserving book does not seem to have found its audience? Welcome to the ins and out of book marketing and promotion. In this publishing special-topic course, students will follow trade books in a variety of genres from their initial marketing plans through full publicity campaigns. We’ll discover where marketing and publicity fit into the life cycle of a book, how they differ and overlap, and how they influence a book’s overall success. Students will do market research and hone their writing skills toward developing artful book materials—from savvy marketing plans to compelling jacket copy, from tailored media kits to thoughtful reading guides. We’ll also consider how the marketing section of an author’s book proposal can help a prospective publisher better appreciate the book’s potential audience. Finally, we’ll learn approaches to securing and promoting author interviews, festival invitations, and bookstore events, as well as the art of the pitch. Many class assignments and activities will offer hands-on experience with titles published by award-winning in-house imprint, Lookout Books. Marketing and publicity guests from the big five and independent presses will join us by video.

CRW 530-001: SCREENWRITING, MONAHAN D
This course is designed to introduce advanced writing students to the basic elements of screenwriting format, technique and narrative style. Students will structure a plot outline and write and revise the first act of a feature film script. All students will complete a series of exercises designed to develop various skills (character, structure, format, transitions, scenes, dialogue, etc.) and aid in the development of their script.

CRW 530-001: SONGWRITING AND THE CREATIVE PROCESS, GERARD P
Songwriting can be a process of distilling themes, event, ideas, and emotions into coherent and memorable forms. It requires compression, focus, and resonance. Short phrases and key words must stand for whole pages of prose. Melody and rhythm infuse lyrics with a creative energy. Students will study songs from a variety of genres and then write—alone or in collaboration—original songs. The aim is to use the discipline of songwriting to enhance creative work in the student’s chosen genre. We’ll examine basic song structures and chord progression, define terms such as “verse,” chorus,” and “bridge” and how they can apply to traditional literary forms as both metaphors and guides to structure. The songs students write will in some way distill, refine, comment upon, enlarge, or be inspired by their work as poets, nonfiction writers, and fiction writers, and they will write short reflections to make the connections explicitly. The aim is not to write “hit” songs but to invigorate and expand their creative process of writing in all genres. We are interested in the process, not just the product.

We will explore any of several methods of composition, including but not limited to the top-down method, the narrative method, the melodic method, and the shadow or scaffold method.

Requirements:

  • The ability to listen closely.
  • The desire to create in a new form.
  • The willingness to sing and or play in front of others.
  • An openness to collaboration.
  • Not Required: Basic ability to sing or play an instrument will be helpful but not necessary. Each student can create lyrics in a given musical genre and work with a collaborator to make a rudimentary lead sheet of key, melody, and tempo.

CRW 540-001: WRITERS’ WEEK FALL 2019, COX M
This one-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers’ Week. Most of the work will be practical and focused on preparation for the week, which will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with one of the seven visiting writers who will be in residence. BFA students will conference with MFA program students or alumni.  Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week.  As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 10 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 542-001: EKPHRASTIC POETRY, WHITE M
It’s been happening since Homer. We often produce our most inspired and most personal poetry when responding to great art, and getting outside of ourselves. Although ekphrastic writing is most often associated with painting, it can also involve photography, sculpture, architecture, film, almost any art work that invites poetic response. We’ll read and discuss examples, visit area museums and galleries, and write both in-class and on-site. Your final project will be a sequence focusing on the work of a single artist. Grade will be based 75% on a final portfolio of at least six new ekphrastic poems, and 25% on participation.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, PHILLIPS BELL A L
In this generative workshop, we’ll support each other in refining our intentions for our poetic practices, writing new poems, and revising with skill and energy. We’ll make and revise poems, including work in series, using in- and out-of-class prompts, constraints, and exercises. Class writing expeditions, which may include a ferry ride and a visit to the New Hanover County Landfill, will allow us to write in new environments, to find overlooked materials and new subjects, and to think about the terms under which we want to create—techniques, lines of inquiry and research. We will explore ways of listening to each other’s poems in workshop and of offering and incorporating productive feedback. We will read, discuss, and write about a selection of poems that embody the techniques and constraints we try; from these and other sources, each student will gather (or add to) a collection of favorite/exemplary poems. In short, we will delight in the stuff of which poetry is made—sounds, letters, words, phrases, sentences; paper, pen/pencil, pixel, voice, place, time—and in the process of making, and making better. Everyone will complete the course with a portfolio of at least eight revised poems, a catalog of additional drafts/beginnings, and a set of intentions for future work. 

CRW 543-001: FORMS OF POETRY—PROCESS AND REVISION, COX M
A study of generating and revising poems that will offer students a variety of tools. Format:  seminar, extensive critical reading and discussion. Numerous presentations. Writing in class. Laptop required. 

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, SIEGEL R
A workshop focused on the reading and discussion of participants’ work. Equal emphasis will be placed on matters of craft and process.  MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, BRENNER W
This is a reading and discussion course (elective, not workshop), open to MFA students in all genres, in which we will explore narrative methods, decisions, effects, etc. in recently published creative nonfiction and some documentary films, thinking and talking about how we as writers might borrow various story-telling and narrative-constructing techniques in our own work, regardless of genre or sub-genre. Book list will include the following: Ayiti (Roxane Gay), Hunger (Roxane Gay), Inscriptions for Headstones (Matthew Vollmer), Truth & Beauty: A Friendship (Ann Patchett), Autobiography of a Face (Lucy Grealy), The Corpse Walker (Liao Yiwu), Edie: An American Girl (Jean Stein and George Plimpton), Being Mortal (Atul Gawande), Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? (Roz Chast), and 100 Essays I Don’t Have Time to Write (Sarah Ruhl). Films will include Unzipped and short selections by director Errol Morris. Students will write occasional short creative exercises using the course texts as models, and one longer response essay at semester’s end.

CRW 546-001: WORKSHOP LONG FORM NARRATIVE I, EDGERTON C
First semester of two semester course and goal is to have draft of fiction or nonfiction book by end of second semester. Timelines and due pages will be designed on an individual basis, but expect something in the line of 20 – 30 pages a month. Among potential class and individual activities--in addition to workshopping chapters and scenes: 1) discussing your book’s plot, scenes, characters, and theme, 2) discussing literary theory, 3) discussing technique in fiction and nonfiction, 4) discussing readings (from among other books, Paris Review Interviews, Mystery and Manners, The Scope of Fiction), 5) dramatic reading of scenes, 6) story plan workshops.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION—LOVE STORIES, LEE REBECCA
Texts include: Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney, An American Marriage by Tayari Jones, Argonauts by Maggie Nelson, The Old Forest, by Peter Taylor, plus short stories and essays to be distributed in class, as well as two screenplays we will read in class. There will be plenty of poetry. We'll be looking at various ways writers re-write the eternal narrative of the love story, either fulfilling or subverting expectations. 

CRW 550-001: WORKSHOP CREATIVE NONFICTION, STAFF

CRW 550-002: WORKSHOP CREATIVE NONFICTION, GESSNER

CRW 560-001 & -002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of the department’s award-winning literary imprint Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). This practical course functions primarily as a robust, hands-on internship at an independent press and provides real-world experience in everything from evaluating manuscripts to copyediting and fact checking, from designing interiors and pitching cover concepts to developing creative marketing and publicity plans in support of the imprint’s forthcoming titles. The Lookout experience will prove valuable and rewarding for students interested in furthering their understanding of literary publishing, whether they want to enter the industry and learn about it toward their own aspirations as authors. Former students have gone on to careers in publishing at Ecco, Graywolf, Hub City Press, W. W. Norton, Orion magazine, and Southern Humanities Review, among others. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: FLASH NONFICTION: THE MOST VERSATILE ESSAY, DASGUPTA S
While micro/flash prose has been around forever—think parables, jokes and fables—there is an urgency to it that’s well-suited to our current, impatient times. These pieces run short, typically up to 700 words, so, it’s crucial they have precise language, powerful imagery, compelling plot twists, and a fine balance of scene and reflection. The form allows real opportunities for experimentation with structure, style, and voice, while also allowing entry into subjects that might be hard to navigate via conventional storytelling methods. Flash prose must also fulfill the promises of a conventional essay—well-defined characters, clear point of view, narrative arc, resolution, etc. Despite their short length, or perhaps because of it, they are challenging but incredibly satisfying to write. In this course, students will read several books of flash nonfiction that will be matched by regular in-class writing exercises.

 

Spring 2019

CRW 524-003, -002, and -001: ECOTONE LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS BELL A L
[Permission of instructor required. Please write Anna Lena Phillips Bell (phillipsal@uncw.edu) for permission to register.]

CRW 524-003 (three credits) is a practical course in the publication of Ecotone, the award-winning national literary magazine of place. The coursework consists of reading submissions and working as part of an editorial team to help bring out an issue of the magazine. Each practicum member is responsible for reading and commenting on a number of manuscripts each week. Ecotone staff members will also fact-check work for upcoming issues, draft the run order for the spring issue, write front-matter copy, and proof the issue. Other work may include promotion planning and implementation as well as event planning. We will set aside time at least once during the semester to think about the process of sending out work to literary magazines. In addition, we will read widely, both to cultivate an understanding of Ecotone’s aesthetic and where it sits in the literary landscape, and to find new voices the magazine might publish. Practicum members will read and review one past issue of Ecotone, and will subscribe to two print literary magazines and follow one online, choosing one of these to review. Reviews may be published on the Ecotone/Lookout Books blog. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. Recommended text: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-001 and -002 are reserved for Ecotone’s section editors. These editorships entail a separate, one-hour weekly meeting. Section editors manage digital and print submissions for a given genre—reading manuscripts, assigning work to readers, reviewing readers’ comments, recommending work for discussion by the team, leading discussions of work, and ensuring that submission responses are sent. Section editors also solicit work from new writers; work closely with the editor to learn the craft of drafting editorial correspondence and marking edits; contribute ideas for special features and issue themes; and help draft and implement promotion plans for the magazine. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit. In spring 2019, applications will be accepted for the positions of poetry editor and nonfiction editor. Students interested in applying must have taken, or be currently enrolled in, the three-credit practicum course.

CRW 524-004 (1CR), -005 (2CR), and -006 (3CR): LITERARY MAGAZINE Chautauqua, GERARD J
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on developmental and copy-editing and fact-checking, and lead an editorial a team for a specific section. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects, as well as social media. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 525-001: WRITING AND EDITING ARTFUL SENTENCES, PHILLIPS BELL A L
What makes a good sentence? How do good sentences accrue to make great paragraphs, sections, stories, essays, poems? This course is an exploration of the sentence through rhetoric and syntax, among other considerations. In it we will articulate, practice, and expand our own strategies and style for sentence-making in our genres of choice. The course will also offer experience in crafting effective editorial communication, and insight into essential parts of the editorial process from both the writer’s and the editor’s perspective. Assignments will include two editing projects for which students may submit either new work or revised work from prior semesters. Visits with guest editors (most via Skype) will provide additional insight. At the conclusion of the semester, students will have a deeper understanding of syntax and the myriad ways it can work, names for and ways of talking about common and less-common rhetorical devices, a sense of how several professional editors approach substantive edits at the line level, and experience in both editing and responding to edits. Course texts will include Artful Sentences: Syntax As Style, by Virginia Tufte, and Figures of Speech: Sixty Ways to Turn a Phrase, by Arthur Quinn, as well as an index of favorite sentences and passages created by the class.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, CROWE M
This course combines investigation of the Confessional mode in American poetry with a workshop of student poems. We’ll read the mid-twentieth century poets whose work was first identified as Confessional—Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, and W.D. Snodgrass, alongside the work of later 20th-century and contemporary poets who could not help operating in some relation to Confession, whether by pushing even harder against the boundaries of propriety and privacy or by resisting its apparent mandate to the personal. We’ll investigate the aesthetic, cultural, political, and literary historical meanings of Confession, both as a school of poetry and as a label rarely applied by poets to their own work. Meanwhile, students will explore the relationship of their own work to Confession, whether they embrace or actively resist the “lyric I“ and the personal, nonfictional mode of utterance that has been, for so long, so central to American poetry. Students will explore their own personal and political and formal aims in workshop, in class discussions, and in short reflective prose writing assignments. Finally, each student will produce a portfolio of polished poems and a manifesto in which s/he tries to answer some of the course’s central questions, making a particular argument about how ideas of honesty, authenticity, and “the self” operate in their work.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, COX M
Though it is essentially a craft-oriented workshop wherein poets will critique and encourage each other's work, I am also planning to make room for a number of in-class revision exercises or presentations.  I will tailor these exercises in process and revision to the group’s needs. I will provide individualized reading lists.  Student products will include a portfolio of eight finished poems, plus revision drafts. The journal will consist of:  a) responses to reading assignments in modern and contemporary poetry and poetics, including an anthology of twelve contemporary women poets; b) weekly reflections; and c) extensive exploration of a craft concept of your choice. 

CRW 543-001: FORMS OF POETRY, WHITE M
This forms course will include a quick tour of received form through history, with an emphasis on contemporary variants. We’ll read and discuss Annie Finch’s text A Poet’s Craft, as well as contemporary collections that feature innovative or experimental approaches to form, from poets such as Ted Berrigan, Patricia Smith, and Terrance Hayes. Although primarily a seminar, in this course we’ll also workshop your own explorations of poetic form.  

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, EDGERTON C
Among planned activities: workshopping stories, scenes, novel chapters: discussions of literary theory; discussions of technique in fiction; discussions and readings of favorite passages and authors; performance of short scripts adapted from fiction produced for this class; a class trip--potentially. At the outset, we may examine alternate approaches to the traditional workshop.

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, DE GRAMONT M
In this class, we will work on writing literature for teens.  Class time will consist of exercises, workshops of your writing, and discussion of contemporary Young Adult themes.  We will also read some contemporary young adult literature.

CRW 544-003 (1CR): FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, Visiting Writer Taylor Brown
RESEARCH VS IMAGINATION
In this month-long fiction workshop, we will focus on writing from the perspective of characters from time periods other than our own, both past and future. We will discuss the ability of such work to speak to the present, the role of research versus imagination, and the process and pitfalls of world-building for the fiction writer.
Along the way, we’ll make sure to consider practical strategies and lessons for staying the path, as well as the habits, regimens, and work philosophies of writers from the past and present.  Students will write one short story or self-contained novel excerpt from the perspective of a character from another time period, past or future.  Poets and CNF writers are also encouraged!

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, DASGUPTA S
EATING OUR WORLD
“Whether or not we spend time in a kitchen, whether or not we even care what’s on the plate, we have a relationship with food that’s launched when we’re born and lasts until we die. Cooking, eating, feeding others, resisting or ignoring food—it all runs deep, so deep that we may not even notice the way it helps to define us.” – Laura Shapiro
The goal of this course is to improve students’ reading, analysis, and writing of creative nonfiction by focusing on food. We will read a variety of food-themed nonfiction books, and each book will be paired with a matching, short writing assignment. At the end of the semester, students will give presentations on how they would want to craft their own food memoirs incorporating stylistic devices they have learned from books read in this class.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION, MOTT J
Fantasy, Myth, and Madness, the trifecta of timeless storytelling. In this class we will read novels steeped in myth and imagination as well as discuss why these types of stories persist within the human imagination. We will read works from John Gardner, H.P. Lovecraft, Joseph Campbell, and more. In addition, we will be exploring how these themes relate to our own writing via writing exercises and class discussion.

CRW 548-001: WORKSHOP LONG FORM NARRATIVE I, GERARD P
This course builds on the foundation laid by CRW 546: Writing the Long Form Narrative I.* The goal is for each member of workshop to produce a solid beginning of a viable novel (fiction or nonfiction) then to exploit that beginning with several chapters of lively, original writing that advances the story and its themes– both text and subtext. Whether this particular novel ultimately succeeds or fails, the goal is to get far enough along in this course that the writer can and will finish it, thus learning how to handle the arc, scope, and scale of the long form of narrative prose. Each writer in class will hand in working drafts of the opening chapter(s) and at least one other significant passage from the novel-in-progress. There is no precise word count, but shoot for something in the neighborhood of 10,000- 15,000 words (40-50 pages) total. Attached to the first handout should be your one-sentence logline of the main focus of the novel. Each student will also turn in two copies of signed, written comments– one to the author whose work is under discussion, the other to the instructor via email.
*A student who has not taken 546 may enroll with instructor’s permission; please contact instructor prior to the end of Fall semester.

 

CRW 550-001 (1CR): WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, Visiting Writer Camille T. Dungy

 

CRW 550-002: BEYOND MEMOIR, A WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, GESSNER D
The goal of this class is to create nonfiction that uses personal experience but does not focus on that experience as an end in itself. We will explore hybrid forms that combine research, interviews, travel writing, nature writing, reportage and memoir.  It is an exciting time in the world of creative nonfiction and part of that excitement comes from the wide possibilities and variety of forms that make up the genre.  One goal of the class will be to take your more personal writing and see if it can serve a larger story. Due to this, the first half of the class will be less workshop-heavy as we work to create magazine or book proposals to pitch to book and magazine editors.  Assignments will include interviews, field notes, research, and trips to the places where your stories are.

CRW 560-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at an independent literary press and provides hands-on experience in evaluating manuscripts, copyediting, fact checking, proofreading, designing book interiors and pitching cover concepts, publicity, social media management, marketing and sales, grant writing, and producing promotional materials for the imprint. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: WRITING ABOUT PEOPLE, BRENNER W
This is a reading course (elective, not workshop) for students working in all genres, focusing on the craft of telling someone’s story, including your own. We’ll read creative nonfiction, fiction, hybrid forms, and watch a couple of documentary films, with an eye towards how we writers can best use various story-telling techniques and approaches in our own work. We’ll focus primarily on memoir, biography, and oral history – writing about people, including one’s self – though some texts we’ll read don’t fall easily into any genre or category. Books will include Was This Man A Genius? (Julie Hecht’s biography of comedian Andy Kaufman),Truth & Beauty: A Friendship (Ann Patchett’s memoir about her friendship with Lucy Grealy), Autobiography of a Face (Lucy Grealy’s memoir), Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? (Roz Chast’s graphic memoir), Working (Studs Terkel), Edie: An American Girl (Plimpton and Stein), Inscriptions for Headstones (Matthew Vollmer), Ninety-nine Stories of God (Joy Williams), 100 Essays I Don’t Have Time to Write (Sarah Ruhl), The Weekend (Peter Cameron). Films may include Capturing the Friedmans, The Eyes of Tammy Faye (biopic of the late televangelist, narrated by RuPaul), and short selections by Errol Morris. Students will write occasional short creative exercises and one longer final essay or final creative project.

CRW 580-003: THE WRITING LIFE, GESSNER D
This class will focus on all aspects of the writing life.  What does it mean to live a life of writing and reading books?  How do we navigate such an unconventional life? The course will be broken down into two halves. The first will focus on the spiritual aspects of the writing life, as well as work habits, and the second on more practical aspects. But while we will end on a practical note we will keep our focus on the larger picture, and the philosophical aspects of choosing to be a writer in today's world. Throughout the term we will be visited by other writers who will discuss their own writing lives.

 

Fall 2018

CRW 503-001: CREATIVE WRITING PEDAGOGY, CROWE M
This seminar provides training in the method and practice of teaching creative writing in a university or college setting, and it functions as the weekly staff meeting for those serving as new teaching assistants (GTA and DIS) in CRW 201.
Together we’ll read and discuss pedagogical texts, evaluate creative writing textbooks and methodologies, and consider a wide range of “problems in teaching.” (Can creative writing be taught? Should it be graded? By what method? How best can we handle conflict in the classroom or respond to sensitive material in student writing?) We’ll engage together in a thoroughgoing examination of the conventional workshop model and locate or imagine alternative strategies for serving diverse learning/writing communities. Each student-teacher will keep a journal and write a number of short, informal responses throughout the semester, which will culminate in a polished Teaching Philosophy suitable for inclusion in a professional dossier.

CRW 523-001: BOOKBUILDING, RAMOS M
For students interested in the basics, this course offers intensive hands-on training in book design and production using desktop publishing software in a Macintosh lab. Students develop skills through a progressively more complex series of design projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work, in a small edition. Students should gain from this course basic software skills, a heightened design aesthetic, an understanding of how books are produced, manuscript to bookshelf, and an overview of small press publishing. The course meets for three hours a week, but students should allow ample additional time to complete assignments in the Publishing Lab outside of class hours.

CRW 524-001 (3), -003 (2), and -004 (1) Ecotone LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS BELL A L
[Permission of instructor required. Please write Anna Lena Phillips Bell for permission to register.] CRW524-001 (three credits) is a practical course in the publication of Ecotone, the national literary magazine that seeks to reimagine place. The coursework consists of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. Everyone is responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing business of the magazine in the realms of editorial, production, marketing, research, and some design. In addition, we will cultivate an understanding of where Ecotone sits in the landscape of literary magazines. Everyone will read and review at least one prior issue of Ecotone, and will subscribe to two print magazines and follow one online, choosing one of these to review. Reviews may be published on the Ecotone/Lookout Books blog. In spring 2019, applications will be accepted for two section-editor positions for the magazine; these positions are open to students who have taken, or are currently enrolled in, the Ecotone practicum. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. Recommended text: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition. Current Ecotone editors should register for 524-003/004; all others register for 524-001. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-002: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY MAGAZINE, GERARD J
[Permission of Instructor Required] This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on a developmental editing projects, assist and participate in design process, and act as team leaders, mentoring undergraduate students. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. Students work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work.
Course may be repeated for credit. Variable credit (1 to 3 hours) possible for graduate students.

CRW 530-001: SCREENWRITING, MONAHAN D
This course is designed to introduce advanced writing students to the basic elements of screenwriting format, technique and narrative style. Students will structure a plot outline and write and revise the first act of a feature film script. All students will complete a series of exercises designed to develop various skills (character, structure, format, transitions, scenes, dialogue, etc.) and aid in the development of their script.

CRW 540-001: WRITERS’ WEEK FALL 2018, SMITH E
This one-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers’ Week. This year Writers’ Week will feature writers from Ecotone and this class will have an emphasis on writing from place, including some writing exercises focused on place.  But most of the work will be practical and focused on preparation for the week, which will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with one of the seven visiting writers who will be in residence. BFA students will conference with MFA program students or alumni.  Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week.  As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 10 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 542-001: GRADUATE POETRY WORKSHOP, WHITE M
The backbone of this workshop will consist of peer review of new student poems in a supportive, challenging atmosphere. We’ll definitely make room for experimental poetry and/or prose sequences as well as standalone pieces. For our reading list, we will draw inspiration and writing prompts from innovative work by poets and writers such as Tracy K. Smith, Layli Long Soldier, and/or Maggie Nelson. Grades will be based 75% on a final portfolio of about 10 pages of revised poetry and/or poetic prose; and 25% on critiques, discussions, and other work.

CRW 543-001: FORMS OF POETRY, COX M
The Poetic Line. A survey of the poetic line, focusing on free verse prosody against a background of traditional metrical prosody and aesthetics.  We will read a variety of poets, new and old. Designed to help writers sharpen their sense of historical development and critical terminology, the course will aid students in preparing for the MFA examination.  Format:  seminar, formal experimentation, critical reading and discussion, presentations. 

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, BRENNER W
This is a semi-traditional workshop in which your work is our primary text. Students will each hand in two pieces of fiction (short story, chapter, flash, other) for discussion and at least one conference with instructor. “Semi-traditional” because we may vary our weekly discussion formats based on your feedback about what works best for you. I.e. discussion of how we discuss will be an ongoing discussion. As for the work, I am especially interested in discovering potential, what’s almost but not quite on the page, and in those moments in any piece of writing that feel most radioactive, unforgettable. We will read published contemporary fiction distributed in class and may watch an occasional film. Goals are to provide feedback, mentoring, and support for individual students and their projects, illuminate issues of craft for everyone, and remind us how much we love writing.

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, LEE R
Strong emphasis on character, event, narrative strategy, image and theme (or maybe, more accurately, series of ideas flowing under the work, giving story momentum and direction.)
We will also read some craft essays, and the novel The Secret History, by Donna Tartt.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION—READING THE WHITING AWARD, DE GRAMONT
Perhaps the most prestigious award an emerging author can receive, the Whiting Award has been granted to writers at the beginning of their career since 1985. This makes it a great lens into contemporary literature, and the kind of innovation that can make a young writer stand out. In this class we will read novels and short story collections by winners, and discuss narrative aspects such as voice, structure, tense and point of view, in addition to identifying the aspects that makes the work worthy of the recognition. As well as discussing the texts we will perform in-class writing exercises related to that week’s reading.

CRW 560-001, 002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a small literary press and provides hands-on experience in evaluating manuscripts, copyediting, proofreading, designing book interiors and pitching cover concepts, publicity, social media management, marketing, grant writing, and producing promotional materials for the imprint. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.] 

CRW 580-001: FOOD WRITING, SIEGEL R
What do we talk about when we talk about food—and cooking, and eating, and feeding others? This course will sample a range of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry exploring that vast and complicated subject. Possibilities include Ruth Reichl, M.F.K. Fischer, Anthony Bourdain, and David Foster Wallace. There will be one major creative project and possibly other short assignments, but the emphasis will be on fast-paced, rigorous reading and discussion.

 

Spring 2018

CRW 524-001 (3), -003 (2), and -004 (1) Ecotone LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS BELL A L [Permission of instructor required. Please write Anna Lena Phillips Bell for permission to register.] CRW524-001 (three credits) is a practical course in the publication of Ecotone, the national literary magazine that seeks to reimagine place. The coursework consists of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. Everyone is responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing business of the magazine in the realms of editorial, production, marketing, research, and some design. In addition, we will cultivate an understanding of where Ecotone sits in the landscape of literary magazines. Everyone will read and review at least one prior issue of Ecotone, and will subscribe to two print magazines and follow one online, choosing one of these to review. Reviews may be published on the Ecotone/Lookout Books blog. In spring 2018, applications will be accepted for the positions of managing editor and fiction editor. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. Recommended text: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition. Current Ecotone editors should register for 524-003/004; all others register for 524-001. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-002 (3), CRW 524-005 (1), & CRW 524-006 (2): LITERARY MAGAZINE Chautauqua, GERARD P This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on editing and fact-checking, tackle marketing/sales issues, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work to build the next issue of Chautauqua; in addition, each student will provide leadership for an undergraduate team and act as an editing mentor. All write posts for social media. Each team will present regular updates on their projects and work. Optional: Participation in Chautauqua On the Air, a broadcast edition of the journal. Course may be repeated for credit.  

CRW 525-001: THE HANDMADE BOOK, PHILLIPS BELL A L This ourse offers a hands-on exploration of traditional and experimental practices for book making. Each week, we will learn a new book structure or book-arts technique, beginning with the basics—simple pamphlets and zines—and progressing to such structures as buttonhole books, Coptic binding, and complex folded books. As we experiment with making our own books, we will actively seek out and review both historical and current examples of the craft, investigating the history of book arts in the context of small-press culture. We’ll consider artists’ books, little magazines, tiny-press publishing, broadsides, printed ephemera, visual poetry, altered books and erasures, and other visual forms, all in light of literary practice. We will ask what book arts can offer to the writing process, and to engagement with audiences—both for our own work, and for the work of others we hope to publish. Schedule permitting, we will visit the studio of a letterpress printer or book artist, and guest speakers will broaden our perspective on design principles. The course will include two extended book-arts labs, to occur on Fridays, which will be scheduled at the beginning of the semester. Students will leave the course with a fuller sense of the history of text-image intersections, and with a range of skills and techniques for creating handmade and limited-edition artist books. 

 CRW 530-001: SONGWRITING: THE CREATIVE PROCESS, GERARD P Songwriting can be a process of distilling themes, events, ideas, and emotions into coherent and memorable forms. It requires compression, focus, and resonance. Short phrases and key words must stand for whole pages of prose. Melody and rhythm infuse lyrics with a creative energy. Song is related to poetry but is not exactly poetry, though some poetry—such as that of Byron, Yeats, and Burns—has been readily set to music. The aim of this course will not be just to write songs but to use the songwriting process to enhance and open up the writer’s creative process in his or her genre. We’ll examine basic song structures and chord progression, define terms such as “verse,” chorus,” and “bridge” and how they can apply to traditional literary forms as both metaphors and guides to structure. Students will study songs from a variety of genres and then write—alone or in collaboration—original songs. The songs students write will in some way distill, refine, comment upon, enlarge, or be inspired by their work as poets, nonfiction writers, and fiction writers, and they will write short reflections to make the connections explicitly. The aim is not to write “hit” songs but to invigorate and expand their creative process of writing in all genres. We are interested in the process even more than the product. Note: All students are welcome, even those who don’t sing or play an instrument. You will learn the rudiments of music theory as it applies to songs and those with musical experience will help those without. Near the end of the semester, we will record one song from each student in the class in a professional recording studio. There is no fee for this. 

CRW 530-002: SCREENWRITING, HACKLER F This course is an introduction to the art and craft of screenwriting. Students will develop an original story idea, create a plot outline, and write and revise the first act of a feature screenplay. The course will cover such topics as characterization, goal, conflict, and dramatic structure, and will include a series of exercises designed to help you develop and write motion picture scripts.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP—TRANSLATION, MÖRLING M Octavio Paz said: “Translation is an art of analogy, the art of finding correspondences. An art of shadows and echoes…” Charles Baudelaire said that poetry is essentially analogy. The idea of universal correspondence comes from the idea that language is a micro cosmos, a double of the universe. Between the language of the universe and the universe of language, there is a bridge, a link: poetry. The poet, says Baudelaire, is the translator.” In this class we will read and compare multiple translations of single poems examine the choices and strategies of translation. In addition, each student in the class will also provide weekly contributions of his or her own translation of given poems. These translations will serve as focal points for the larger subject of translation, that of the poet as translator. Readings will include selections from Swedish, German, French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Eastern European, Spanish and South American poets. Knowledge of a second language is welcome but not necessary.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP—BOOK LENGTH, WHITE M In this year-long poetry workshop, we’ll focus on the collection, in anticipation of your MFA thesis. We’ll turn our attention toward the chapbook as an art form, and will read several examples. Meanwhile, you’ll be generating and workshopping individual poems that fit your developing manuscript. Finally, we will workshop your full collections and work together as peer editors to polish and help complete your vision. Note: as this is a year-long class, students should plan to enroll in both the fall and the spring semesters.

CRW 542-003 (1): POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, with Visiting Writer Patricia Smith  Fridays at 2:00 2/2, 2/9, 2/22 and one date TBA

CRW 543-001: FORMS OF POETRY, COX M A sweeping survey of practical poetics focusing on free verse prosody against a background of traditional metrical prosody and aesthetics.  Designed to help writers sharpen their sense of historical development and critical terminology, the course will aid students in preparing for the MFA examination.  Format:  seminar, extensive critical reading and discussion, presentations.  

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, EDGERTON C Generally speaking, each student is expected to present two short stories for workshopping during this class. Workshops will be both traditional and non-traditional (as explained and discussed in class) according to individual needs. Among potential class and individual activities--in addition to workshopping: 1) discussions of a story's plot, scenes, characters, theme, and context in "modern life," 2) discussions of literary theory, 3) discussion of technique in fiction and nonfiction, 4) discussions of readings (from among other sources, Paris Review Interviews, Mystery and Manners, Civilization and Its Discontents), 5) field trips, 5) dramatic reading and/or filming of scenes followed by analysis. Each student will respond to each workshop piece in writing prior to class or else experience a commensurate decline in final course grade. Students being workshopped are encouraged, time permitting, to talk about their stories. Refutation by the story writer of any criticisms of a story (during class time) is discouraged. Disregarding criticism that seems unreasonable to the writer is encouraged. 

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, MOEZZI M In this course, we will read, discuss, critique and write a wide variety of creative nonfiction. The class will include assigned readings, short writing assignments, and at least one presentation of the student’s own choosing. The aim of the course is to improve your writing skills through critical reading, discussion, writing and revision—and ultimately, to learn from and be inspired by other writers, writing and categories of writing without being so unduly limited and influenced by them that you abandon your own unique creative signature.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION, SIEGEL R One of the most powerful elements in fiction is the image, the word-picture that directly transmits what the writer sees. It is physical and yet also highly emotional, steeped in character perception and therefore deeply psychological. Perhaps more than any other aspect of fiction, it gives us the jolt of reality and makes us believe…This course will explore the role of imagery, and by extension all sensory experience, in the short story and the novel. We will read and discuss a selection of image-based fictions. There will be a final creative project and a public reading.

CRW 548-002: WORKSHOP LONG FORM NARRATIVE II, DE GRAMONT N In the second semester of a year-long class, students will continue working on novels and memoir in a workshop format.

CRW 550-002: WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, BRENNER W This is a semi-traditional workshop course in which student work is our primary text.  Students will each hand in two pieces of creative nonfiction (any form, genre, hybrid- or sub-genre welcome) for discussion and at least one conference w/ instructor. “Semi-traditional” because we may vary our weekly discussion formats based on your feedback about what works best for you. I.e. discussion of how we discuss will be an ongoing discussion. As for the work, I am especially interested in the potential, what’s not yet on the page, and those moments, lines, scenes, etc. already on the page that feel quite literally unforgettable. We will read some short published creative nonfiction and may watch an occasional film excerpt. Goals are to provide feedback, mentoring, and support for individual students and their projects, to illuminate issues of craft for everyone, and to remind us how much we love writing.

CRW 580-001: MODERN ARTISTS AND WRITERS, FURIA P Study of how modern writers such as Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, William Carlos  Williams, and others were influenced, in form and technique, by such artists as Cezanne, Matisse, Picasso, Stieglitz, Duchamp, and O’Keeffe, as well as by artistic movements such as Cubism and Dadaism.

CRW 580-002: GRAPHIC NOVEL, GESSNER D The main goals of this class are to give you an overview of the genre of graphic novels and to give you a language to discuss this emerging form. To achieve these goals we will read from a broad, though admittedly far from comprehensive, range of graphic novels. Secondarily, we will work on our own graphic projects. It should be stressed that no art background is required for this. Stick figures are okay. 

CRW 580-003: GHOST STORIES AND ELEGIES, LEE R This will be a discussion class on various texts dealing with loss.  All genres will be consulted.  Books include but are not limited to the graphic novels Imagine Wanting Only This, by Kristen Radtke, and The Best We Could Do, by Thi Bui.  Other texts include: Sula, by Toni Morrison, Carried Away by Alice Munro, and the memoir The Afterlife, by Donald Antrim.   Lots of poetry.  Occasional in-class writing.

Fall 2017

CRW 503-001: CREATIVE WRITING PEDAGOGY, BRENNER W This course doubles as pedagogy seminar and the weekly staff meeting for new teaching assistants (GTA and DIS) teaching CRW 201. The course provides you with a wealth of materials and resources for your teaching career here at UNCW and beyond. Class meetings serve as a forum in which to share and address your ongoing teaching experiences, questions, successes, and challenges. Occasional guest speakers will include experienced TAs and professors. We will also read and discuss a range of articles about pedagogical theory and methods, with an eye toward developing your own teaching philosophy and methodology. You will write one personal essay at semester's end, reflecting on both your 201 experience and your ideas for future classes.

CRW 523-001: BOOKBUILDING, RAMOS M For students interested in the basics, this course offers intensive hands-on training in book design and production using desktop publishing software in a Macintosh lab. Students develop skills through a progressively more complex series of design projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work, in a small edition. Students should gain from this course basic software skills, a heightened design aesthetic, an understanding of how books are produced, manuscript to bookshelf, and an overview of small press publishing. The course meets for three hours a week, but students should allow ample additional time to complete assignments in the Publishing Lab outside of class hours.

CRW 524-001 (3), -004 (2), & -005 (1) Ecotone LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS A L [Permission of instructor required; write Anna Lena Phillips Bell for permission to register. All practicum members must register for section 524-001, with the exception of Ecotone editors, who should register for 524-003/004.] This is a practical course in the publication of Ecotone, the national literary magazine that seeks to reimagine place. The coursework consists of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts each week, and for contributing to the ongoing business of the magazine in the realms of editorial, production, promotions, research, and some design. Ecotone staff members will fact-check work for the magazine, generate front matter, draft run order, proof the fall issue, and write for the Ecotone/Lookout Books blog. In addition, we will work to improve our understanding of the literary landscape and where Ecotone sits in it. Everyone will read and review at least one prior issue of Ecotone, and will subscribe to two print literary magazines and follow one online magazine, choosing one of these to review. In spring 2017, applications will be accepted for the position of poetry editor; students who have taken the practicum (or are enrolled in it in spring 2017) are eligible to apply. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list. Recommended texts: Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition; The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-002 & -003: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL (1-3 Credits), GERARD P T 3:30-6:15 PM KE 2112 This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on editing and fact-checking, tackle marketing/sales issues, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work to build the next issue of Chautauqua; in addition, each student will provide leadership for an undergraduate team and act as an editing mentor. All write posts for social media. Each team will present regular updates on their projects and work. Optional: Participation in  Chautauqua On the Air, a broadcast edition of the journal. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 525-001: BOOK PUBLISHING FROM ACQUISITION TO ON SALE with visiting publishing professional Miriam Parker [1-credit course to be offered October–November] Associate Publisher of Ecco Books at HarperCollins, Miriam Parker, will lead students though a four-week practical course on the process a publisher follows to publish a book—from acquisition and editing to production, sales, marketing, and publicity. The course will benefit both writers and aspiring publishers. Together, we’ll explore the wide variety of roles that exist within a publishing house and discuss career opportunities. We’ll study the campaigns of a variety of books including Ecco’s The Nest. Students will participate in group and individual projects including researching book campaigns, writing flap copy, and designing an effective advertising campaign. The course will feature guests via Skype from every aspect of book publishing, from agents to editors to sales representatives.

CRW 525-002: PUBLISHING: MAGAZINE RESEARCH with visiting author and editor John Jeremiah Sullivan [1-credit course to be offered Thursdays in September] This class will involve an exploration of research-based writing in all its forms. We will look at classic pieces of non-fiction (also some fiction and poetry) that involved heavy research. We will consider archives, libraries, interview techniques, and the new frontier of electronic databases. Students currently working on their own research projects will have a chance to present their work and get feedback toward pitching to magazines and publishers. John Jeremiah Sullivan is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the southern editor of The Paris Review. He writes for GQ, Harper’s Magazine, and Oxford American, and is the author of Blood Horses. Sullivan lives in Wilmington, North Carolina.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, CROWE M This course combines investigation of the political/personal dichotomy in American poetry with a workshop of student poems. We’ll read a diverse group of modern and contemporary poets and consider whether their work falls into one or the other “camp” or straddles the line productively/provocatively or perhaps avoids/rejects classification altogether. We’ll also read essays by poets who address, more or less directly, questions like, “What is the poet’s obligation to history, to the current social and political landscape, to the future?” and “What kind of poetry has the greatest potential impact on readers, on the world?” Students will explore their own personal and political and formal aims in workshop, in class discussions, and in short reflective prose writing assignments. Finally, each student will produce a portfolio of polished poems and a manifesto in which s/he tries to answer some of the course’s central questions, making a particular argument about how poetry matters.

CRW 540-001: WRITERS’ WEEK FALL 2017 This one-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers’ Week. Most of the work will be practical and focused on preparation for the week, which will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with one of the seven visiting writers who will be in residence. BFA students will conference with MFA program students or alumni. Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week. As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 10 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 542-002: BOOK LENGTH POETRY, WHITE M. In this year-long poetry workshop, we’ll focus on the collection, in anticipation of your MFA thesis. We’ll begin in the fall with a study of several collections by contemporary poets such as Eduardo C. Corral, Tracy K. Smith, and Solmaz Sharif. We’ll consider the differences between what some call the “project book” vs. the “mixed tape.” Meanwhile, you’ll be generating and workshopping individual poems that fit your chosen theme or mode. In the spring, we will workshop your collections (25 to 50 pp.), and work together as peer editors to help fulfill your vision. Note: as this is a year-long class, students should plan to enroll in both the fall and the spring semesters.

CRW 542-003: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, COX M Though it is essentially a craft-oriented workshop wherein poets will critique and encourage each other's work, there will also be time to discussions of practical criticism. Each week a student will choose, disseminate and introduce an essay on craft.  There may be complementary common reading. Student products will include a portfolio of eight finished poems, plus revision drafts. The journal will consist of:  a) weekly reflections and responses to readings; b) process exercises; and c) extensive exploration into a personally relevant craft concept of your choosing. 

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP (3 credit hours), GERARD P M 3:30-6:15 PM KE 1005 We’ll use The Story Behind the Story (Peter Turchi & Andrea Barrett, editors) and some short essays about writing fiction to set the stage for a workshop in fiction of all kinds, traditional and more experimental, short forms and excerpts from longer forms. Part of the aim of the class is for each writer to discover his or her aesthetic, and one of the outcomes of the course should be for each writer to have concisely articulated that aesthetic. So we will examine the manuscripts for all the usual concerns—structure, character, dramatic movement, narrative intelligence, etc., and also for how it exemplifies an artistic vision for what fiction can and ought to do.

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, LEE R This workshop will focus on all the elements of fiction, with particular focus on the development of character.  There will be some published stories read at the start of the semester and ten in-class "experiments' in writing.  We'll spend the rest of the semester workshopping work produced by writers in the class.

CRW 544-0014 FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP with visiting author Jason Mott [1-credit course to be offered 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 and 10/13]  This will be a graduate fiction workshop that, in addition to the typical workshop experience, will include extensive discussion on writing philosophy, the business of writing, and The Writing Life. Students are expected to be very involved in class discussion and to both explore and talk about their own writing philosophy. Each student will turn in one 14-20 page piece of fiction to be workshopped by the class. The only other consideration for this class is that this class will exclude first-person writing. The workshop pieces MAY NOT be written in first person. The reason for this will be discussed on the first day of class. Interested students may also email me prior for clarification if necessary. 

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, FURIA P Historical survey of American creative nonfiction from colonial times to the present, including essays and such works as Gertrude Stein’s The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas , Ernest Hemingway’s, A Moveable Feast, and Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood

CRW 546-001: WORKSHOP, LONG FORM NARRATIVE, DE GRAMONT M This is the first semester of a year-long class, ideally followed in the spring by CRW 548. Producing a book length manuscript is an endurance process; in addition to imagination you need determination, flexibility, and encouragement. This class will aim to be a place where all these things and more can be found. One-on-one support in the form of meetings and personalized reading lists will be provided. In class we will workshop chapters and scenes, as well as discuss your book’s plot, characters, theme, and structure. We will also perform in class exercises geared toward revision and rethinking, and working through whatever might stand in the way of your book’s completion.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION Craft-based instruction in specific formal issues in the tradition of fiction. Assignments will include original fiction, extensive reading, and may also include writing critiques, papers, exercise, etc. May be repeated once for credit (course may be taken multiple times for a maximum of 6 credit hours).

CRW 550-001: GRADUATE WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE WRITING, GESSNER D The focus of this workshop is on putting pen to page, with the goal of generating new work. To this end the early classes will be dedicated to writing prompts, mini-workshops and discussions of the reading, with a focus on form and what we can take from the works we read. I will ask writers to keep track of their weekly output through recording either their hours or page production.

CRW 560-001, -002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E [Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor. Please write Emily Smith for permission to register for this course.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of award-winning literary imprint Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a boutique press and provides hands-on experience in evaluating manuscripts, fact checking, copyediting, proofreading, designing book interiors and pitching cover concepts, developing publicity and marketing plans, managing social media accounts, writing grants, and producing promotional materials for the imprint. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: BORDER CROSSINGS: CONTEMPORARY TRAVEL WRITING, SIEGEL R What is travel writing? How do we define it? Does travel have to be geographic, for example? Or can it be cultural or social-vertical, rather than horizontal? This course explores travel writing of the last thirty years, with particular interest in the way boundaries blur and aesthetic strategies multiply as the genre explodes outward in a globalizing world. Readings include fiction and nonfiction by Ben Lerner, Nell Freudenberger, Pico Iyer, Liao Yiwu, and others. One creative project.

CRW 580-002: A STUDY OF THE IMAGE IN POETRY, MÖRLING M What is an image and how does it occur? Pound defined it as: “…an intellectual and emotional complex in an instant of time.” Gogol said: “The function of the image is to express life itself, not ideas or arguments about life.” In this class we will study the image in poetry but also look at photography and film. We will write and workshop poems with the aim of exploring and developing our own innate sense of the image and its possibilities because as Pound concludes: “It is the presentation of such a ‘complex’ instantaneously which gives the sense of sudden liberation; that sense of freedom from time limits and space limits; that sense of sudden growth, which we experience in the presence of the greater works of art.”   

Spring 2017

CRW 524-001 (3), -003 (2), and -004 (1) Ecotone LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS BELL A L [Permission of instructor required. Please write Anna Lena Phillips Bell for permission to register.] This is a practical course in the publication of Ecotone, the national literary magazine that seeks to reimagine place. The coursework consists of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing practical business of the magazine in the realms of editorial, production, marketing, research, and some design. In addition, we will cultivate an understanding of where Ecotone sits in the literary landscape. Everyone will read and review at least one prior issue of Ecotone, and will subscribe to two print literary magazines and follow one online magazine, choosing one of these to review. We will also write for the Ecotone/Lookout Books blog. In spring 2017, applications will be accepted for the positions of poetry editor and nonfiction editor. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list. Recommended texts: Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition; The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. Current Ecotone editors register for 524-003/004; for all others, the course is three credits. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-002 (3), CRW 524-005 (1), & CRW 524-006 (2): LITERARY MAGAZINE Chautauqua, DE GRAMONT, M This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on developmental and copy-editing and fact-checking, and lead an editorial a team for a specific section. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects, as well as social media. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit. 

CRW 525-001: ETHICS AND PRACTICE OF NONFICTION WRITING AND PUBLISHING, PHILLIPS BELL A L The truth, that increasingly fraught thing, makes for a mess of challenges for writers and publishers of nonfiction. Some are vexing, but many are ultimately generative, providing ways into deeper engagement with our subjects. In this course, we’ll explore the challenges and nuances of writing and editing essays, memoir, journalism, and other forms of creative nonfiction, from the research and writing process to fact checking, editing, and publicity. We’ll examine the tricky course navigated by writers whose subjects are family, friends, and public figures; how to bring science into creative work in ways that are both accurate and compelling; and how to help other writers—whether as an editor or as a peer—revise toward investing their work with greater humaneness and writerly authority. We will consider some controversial texts, but we’ll spend most of our time and energy on exemplary work, and on challenges students have encountered, or hope to encounter, in their own writing and editing. Guest speakers will include experts in editing, journalism, and memoir.  

CRW 542-001: GRADUATE POETRY WORKSHOP, WHITE M The theme is ekphrasis. Students will study ekphrastic poetry along with the art that inspired it. We will write and workshop new poems directly in response to art in museums, galleries, books, and/or online. For our main class project, each student will choose their own artist and write a sequence of ekphrastic poems for workshop. We will schedule museum visits in Washington DC, during the 2017 AWP Conference, for those of us in attendance. Requirements will include a portfolio of new poems, to be turned in at the end of class, with a preface on the art of the selected artist.

CRW 542-003 (1): POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, with Visiting Writer Jason Mott Thursdays at 3:30 1/12, 1/19, 1/26 and 2/2/2017

CRW 543-001: FORMS OF POETRY—THE POETRY OF NATURE AND PLACE, GESSNER D This class will explore seven poets, their work, their lives and their relationship to place and the natural world. We will begin in the 19th century with the life and work of John Keats, then cross the Atlantic to explore the same with Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman. During the second half of the class we will focus on the work of four poets whose work is strongly influenced by, and spilling over with, the natural world: Robinson Jeffers, Gary Snyder, A.R. Ammons, and Mary Oliver. We will supplement our reading of the poems with biography and will always keep in mind the question: how are these historic writers relevant to us, and our work, today? We will experiment with a series of imitative exercises. We will also go on several field trips and focus on honing our own observations of the natural world.   

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, SIEGEL R A workshop focused on the reading and discussion of participants’ work. Equal emphasis will be placed on matters of craft and process.  MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, LEE R In this course, writers will work during class.  Each session will include at least 5 escalating writing prompts, each designed to isolate and investigate various aspects of writing-- image, theme, character, language, setting, metaphor, etc.   Writers should expect to write a lot during class in addition to their regular writing schedule outside of class.  Should work for all genres.  

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, FURIA P A study of such formal aspects of creative nonfiction as voice, point of view, and narrative structure. Readings will include both essays and book-length works by such authors as Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, and Truman Capote. 

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION, DE GRAMONT M Reading the Pulitzer Prize. What makes a piece of fiction stand out so much that it earns one of literature’s highest honors? In this class we will read the winning fiction from 2007-2016 and discuss narrative aspects such as voice, structure, tense, and point of view, as well as discussing the texts we will perform in-class writing exercises related to that week’s reading. Authors include Cormac McCarthy, Elizabeth Strout, Junot Diaz, and Anthony Doerr. 

CRW 548-002: WORKSHOP LONG FORM NARRATIVE II, EDGERTON C CRW 546 is a prerequisite Second semester of two-semester course and goal is to have draft of fiction or nonfiction book by end of second semester. Timelines and due pages will be designed on an individual basis, but expect something in the line of 20 - 30 pages a month. Among potential class and individual activities--in addition to workshopping chapters and scenes: 1) discussing your book's plot, scenes, characters, and theme, 2) discussions of literary theory, 3) discussion of technique in fiction and nonfiction, 4) discussions of readings (from among other books, Paris Review Interviews, Mystery and Manners, Civilization and Its Discontents), 5) dramatic reading of scenes.

CRW 550-001 (1): CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP, with Visiting Writer Duncan Murrell Thursdays at 3:30pm 3/23, 3/30, 4/6 and 4/20/2017

CRW 550-002: WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, BRENNER W This is a traditional workshop course in which student work is our primary text.  Students will each hand in two pieces of creative nonfiction (essays, chapters, any form or sub-genre welcome) for workshop discussion and/or conference w/ instructor. I am especially interested in the potential of each piece we consider, what’s on the page and what’s not yet there, and in those moments on the page that feel most urgent, unforgettable, impossible to turn away from. We will read short published works of creative nonfiction and may watch an occasional film excerpt. Goals in the class are two-fold: to provide feedback, mentoring, and support for individual students and their projects, and to illuminate general issues of narrative craft.

CRW 550-001 (1): CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP, with Visiting Writer Virginia Holman Thursdays at 3:30pm 2/16, 2/23, 3/2 and 3/16/2017

CRW 560-001, 002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E [Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor. Please write Emily Smith for permission to register for this course.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of award-winning literary imprint Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a boutique press and provides hands-on experience in evaluating manuscripts, fact checking, copyediting, proofreading, designing book interiors and pitching cover concepts, developing publicity and marketing plans, managing social media accounts, writing grants, and producing other promotional materials for the imprint. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: SPECULATIVE FICTION—GLOBAL CURRENTS IN WEIRD FICTION, SCI-FI, MAGIC REALISM, AND FANTASY, CHAI M In this class we will examine the phenomenon of speculative fiction in many forms as a literary tool used by writers around the world to examine and critique their societies using elements of the fantastical and surreal rather than realism. We will be reading and discussing long and short-form literary works as well as narrative film and essays. This seminar is not a workshop but a forms class. Students will have the opportunity to write short creative responses inspired by the works discussed as well as a longer reflection essay. Writers/filmmakers to be examined may include Kevin Barry, Roberto Bolaño, Octavia Butler, A.S. Byatt, Samuel J. Delaney, Kazuo Ishiguro, Han Kang, Ken Liu, Carmen Maria Machado, China Mièville, Haruki Murakami, Helen Oyeyemi, Ludmilla Petrushevskaya, Karen Russell, Tsai Ming-liang, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Colson Whitehead, Can Xue, and Charles Yu.

Fall 2016


CRW 503-001: CREATIVE WRITING PEDAGOGY, BRENNER W
This course doubles as pedagogy seminar and the weekly staff meeting for new teaching assistants (GTA and DIS) teaching CRW 201. The course provides you with a wealth of materials and resources for your teaching career here at UNCW and beyond. Class meetings serve as a forum in which to share and address your ongoing teaching experiences, questions, successes, and challenges. Occasional guest speakers will include experienced TAs and professors. We will also read and discuss a range of articles about pedagogical theory and methods, with an eye toward developing your own teaching philosophy and methodology. You will write one personal essay at semester's end, reflecting on both your 201 experience and your ideas for future classes.

CRW 523-001: BOOKBUILDING, SMITH E For students interested in the basics, this course offers hands-on training in book design and production using desktop publishing software in a Macintosh lab. Students develop skills through a progressively more complex series of design projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work, in a small edition. Students should gain from this course basic software skills, a heightened design aesthetic, and an understanding of how books are produced, manuscript to bookshelf. The course meets for three hours a week, but students should allow additional time to complete assignments in the Publishing Lab outside of class hours.

CRW 524-001 (3), -004 (2), & -005 (1) Ecotone LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS A L [Permission of instructor required; write Anna Lena Phillips Bell for permission to register. All practicum members must register for section 524-001, with the exception of Ecotone editors, who should register for 524-003/004.] This is a practical course in the publication of Ecotone, the national literary magazine that seeks to reimagine place. The coursework consists of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts each week, and for contributing to the ongoing business of the magazine in the realms of editorial, production, promotions, research, and some design. Ecotone staff members will fact-check work for the magazine, generate front matter, draft run order, proof the fall issue, and write for the Ecotone/Lookout Books blog. In addition, we will work to improve our understanding of the literary landscape and where Ecotone sits in it. Everyone will read and review at least one prior issue of Ecotone, and will subscribe to two print literary magazines and follow one online magazine, choosing one of these to review. In spring 2017, applications will be accepted for the position of poetry editor; students who have taken the practicum (or are enrolled in it in spring 2017) are eligible to apply. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list. Recommended texts: Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition; The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-002 (3), -003 (1): CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY MAGAZINE, GERARD P This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on editing and fact-checking, tackle marketing/sales issues, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work to build the next issue of Chautauqua; in addition, each student will provide leadership for an undergraduate team, act as an editing mentor. And write posts for social media. Each team will present regular updates on their projects and work. Optional: Participation in  Chautauqua On the Air, a broadcast edition of the journal. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 540-001: WRITERS' WEEK FALL 2016, CHAI M This one-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers' Week. Most of the work will be practical and focused on preparation for the week, which will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with one of the seven visiting writers who will be in residence. BFA students will conference with MFA program students or alumni. Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week. As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 10 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 542-001: GRADUATE WORKSHOP IN POETRY, MÖRLING M Jorge Luis Borges once said: "poetry is expressed in words, but words are not the substance of poetry…The substance of poetry-if I may use a metaphor-is emotion." In this poetry workshop we will focus on the ever-evolving process of our writing and address the emotional nature of our poems. How do we write a poem that deeply engages the reader? We will also discuss different ways of analyzing a poem and how to listen with an open mind and heart to a critique of your own work. In addition, we will focus on the process of revision and discuss the many approaches and ways to revise a poem. Is it possible for instance, to approach a revision the way one would a translation? How do you transform a poem without destroying its urgency and original spirit? How do you arrive at a poem in its ultimate and inevitable form? Everyone is required to submit a raw and freshly written poem every, or every other week. The aim of this class is also for us to learn to become comfortable bringing in poems that are still rough without making excuses for them.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, COX M Though it is essentially a craft-oriented workshop wherein poets will critique and encourage each other's work, there will also be time to discussions of practical criticism. Each week a student will choose, disseminate and introduce an essay on craft.  There may be complementary common reading. Student products will include a portfolio of eight finished poems, plus revision drafts. The journal will consist of:  a) weekly reflections and responses to readings; b) process exercises; and c) extensive exploration into a personally relevant craft concept of your choosing.

CRW 544-001:GRADUATE WORKSHOP IN FICTION, LEE R This will be a course in narrative strategy.  Students will begin semester by reading the classic The Art of Fiction, by John Gardner, as well as shorter essays on storytelling craft.  We will also read the last cycle of Best American Stories (2015) in an effort to analyze as many approaches to narrative as possible.  In addition, the class will function as a traditional workshop, with special attention to character and theme in fiction.

CRW 544-002:GRADUATE WORKSHOP IN FICTION, DE GRAMONT M In this class, students will work on craft through close reading of each other's fiction in a workshop format. Students will write two new and original pieces for workshop and revise one of these pieces substantially. Reading assignments will be based on issues that arise during workshops.

CRW 544-003 (1):FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP WITH VISITING WRITER JILL MCCORKLE (dates TBD)

CRW 546-001: WORKSHOP LONG FORM NARRATIVE I, EDGERTON C First semester of two-semester course and goal is to have draft of fiction or nonfiction book by end of second semester. Timelines and due pages will be designed on an individual basis, but expect something in the line of 20 - 30 pages a month. Among potential class and individual activities--in addition to workshopping chapters and scenes: 1) discussing your book's plot, scenes, characters, and theme, 2) discussions of literary theory, 3) discussion of technique in fiction and nonfiction, 4) discussions of readings (from among other books, Paris Review Interviews, Mystery and Manners, Civilization and Its Discontents), 5) dramatic reading of scenes.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION, SIEGEL R One of the most powerful elements in fiction is the image-the word-picture that directly transmits what the writer sees. It is physical and yet also highly emotional, steeped in character perception and therefore deeply psychological. Perhaps more than any other aspect of fiction, it gives us the jolt of reality and makes us believe…This course will explore the role of imagery, and by extension all sensory experience, in the short story and the novel. We will read and discuss a selection of image-based fictions. There will be a final creative project and a public reading.

CRW 550-001 WORKSHOP CREATIVE NONFICTION, CHAI M In this workshop, students will have the opportunity to explore the rich possibilities of creative nonfiction in multiple forms. Students will receive feedback on their original works of creative nonfiction in a traditional workshop format. We will also discuss and analyze works by established writers of literary journalism, memoir, personal essays, lyric essays and other works to look at technique, aesthetics, and narrative choices. In addition to writing exercises and critique letters and their original pieces for workshop, students will work on revision.

CRW 560-001, 002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E [Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor. Please write Emily Smith for permission to register for this course.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a boutique literary press and provides hands-on experience in evaluating manuscripts, fact checking, copyediting, proofreading, designing book interiors and pitching cover concepts, developing publicity and marketing plans, managing social media accounts, writing grants, and producing promotional materials for the imprint. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: WRITING HISTORY, GERARD P As writers, we mine the public past for events and stories that illuminate the present with the backstory of our culture, politics, conflicts, social and ethical mores, and material achievements. Our history shows us who we are, how we got here, what we value, and how we have struggled for a communal identity. Assignments will include reading and responding to writing based on history. We'll explore the aesthetics and ethics of using history as the basis for fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. Students will also conduct original historical research and write creative work in their chosen genre based on what they discover

CRW 580-002: THE WRITING LIFE, GESSNER D This class will focus on all aspects of the writing life.  What does it mean to live a life of writing and reading books?  How do we navigate such an unconventional life? The course will be broken down into two halves. The first will focus on the spiritual aspects of the writing life, as well as work habits, and the second on more practical aspects. But while we will end on a practical note we will keep our focus on the larger picture, and the philosophical aspects of choosing to be a writer in today's world. Throughout the term we will be visited by other writers who will discuss their own writing lives.

Spring 2016


CRW 524-001 (3), -003 (2), and -004 (1) Ecotone LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS A L
[Permission of instructor required. Please write Anna Lena Phillips Bell for permission to register.] This is a practical course in the publication of Ecotone, the national literary magazine that seeks to reimagine place. The coursework consists of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing practical business of the magazine in the realms of editorial, production, marketing, research, and some design. In addition, we will cultivate an understanding of where Ecotone sits in the literary landscape. Everyone will read and review at least one prior issue of Ecotone, and will subscribe to two print literary magazines and follow one online magazine, choosing one of these to review. We will also write for the Ecotone/Lookout Books blog. In spring 2016, applications will be accepted for the positions of managing editor, fiction editor, and nonfiction editor. Required texts: Subscriptions to two literary magazines from approved list. Recommended texts: Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition; The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. Current Ecotone editors register for 524-003/004; for all others, the course is three credits. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-002 (3) and CRW 524-005 (1) Chautauqua LITERARY MAGAZINE, GERARD P
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on developmental and copy-editing and fact-checking, and lead an editorial a team for a specific section. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects, as well as social media. We will work in teams - with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 525-001: WORKING AS AN EDITOR (SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLISHING), PHILLIPS A L
This course provides an introduction to, and hands-on experience in, working as an editor-a skill and vocation useful on the job market as well as in improving one's own writing. We will consider acquisitions and developmental editing, line editing, fact checking, and copyediting, practicing each of these and discussing the unique skills it requires. Our focus will be on the editing of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry for magazine and book publishers; if the opportunity permits, we will work together over the course of the semester to edit a book-length manuscript. Topics will include proposal development, narrative, argument, and voice, as well as editing for style, substantive editing at the line level, the nuances of copyediting, and editorial communication. For each stage of editing, we will also explore career possibilities and job opportunities. We will practice creating and maintaining collegial relationships throughout the editing process, and work to gain an understanding of how each phase of editing fits within the process overall. Students will be evaluated via individual and group editing projects. Course texts will include The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.

CRW 530-001: SCREENWRITING. HACKLER C
This course is an introduction to the art and craft of screenwriting. Students will develop an original story idea, create a plot outline, and write and revise the first act of a feature screenplay. The course will cover such topics as characterization, goal, conflict, and dramatic structure, and will include a series of exercises designed to help you develop and write motion picture scripts.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, MORLING, M
In this poetry workshop we will focus on the process of writing, the different ways of analyzing a poem and on how to listen with an open mind to a critique of your own work. We will focus on the process of revision and discuss the many approaches and ways to revise a poem. Is it possible for instance, to approach a revision the way one would a translation? How do you transform a poem without destroying its urgency and original spirit? How do you arrive at a poem in its ultimate form? Everyone is required to submit a raw and freshly written poem every week. The aim of this class is also for everyone to learn to become comfortable bringing in poems that are rough without making excuses for them.

CRW 542-003: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, with Visiting Writer Nikky Finney
Thursdays at 3:30
4/7,4/14,4/21 and 4/28/2016

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP: THE REVISION PROCESS, SIEGEL R
A workshop focused on the revision process. Participants will submit an early draft of a piece of fiction and a revision of that piece and will also do some short exercises exploring the revision process. In addition, they will choose a published piece of fiction to present to the class.MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, DE GRAMONT M
In this class, students will work on craft through close reading of each other's fiction in a workshop format. Students will write two new and original pieces for workshop and revise one of these pieces substantially. Reading assignments will be based on issues that arise during workshops.

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, BRENNER W
This is a reading & discussion course (elective, not workshop), open to MFA students in all genres, in which we will explore narrative methods, decisions, effects, etc. in recently published creative nonfiction and some documentary films, thinking and talking about how we as writers might borrow various story-telling and narrative-constructing techniques in our own work.The focus is primarily on memoir, biography, and oral history, though many of the texts don't fall easily into any category. Books will include Was This Man A Genius? (Julie Hecht), Truth & Beauty: A Friendship (Ann Patchett), Autobiography of a Face (Lucy Grealy), Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant? (Roz Chast), Working (Studs Terkel), and Edie: An American Girl (Jean Stein and George Plimpton). Films will include Moving Midway, Capturing the Friedmans, The Eyes of Tammy Faye, and selections by director Errol Morris. Students will write one response essay at semester's end, and an occasional short exercise using the course texts as models.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION, LEE R
Click here for the 2015-16 graduate catalogue course descriptions.

CRW 548-002: WORKSHOP LONG FORM NARRATIVE II, EDGERTON C
Second semester of two semester course and goal is to have draft of fiction or nonfiction book by end of this semester. Timelines and due pages will be designed on an individual basis, but expect something in the line of 20 - 30 pages a month. Among potential class and individual activities--in addition to workshopping chapters and scenes: 1) discussing your book's plot, scenes, characters, and theme, 2) discussions of literary theory, 3) discussion of technique in fiction and nonfiction, 4) discussions of readings (from among other books, Paris Review Interviews, Mystery and Manners, Civilization and Its Discontents), 5) dramatic reading of scenes.

CRW 550-001: WORKSHOP CREATIVE NONFICTION, GERARD
This workshop will focus on fact-based writing, including personal narrative, reportorial essay, and writing that combines both approaches. The primary text will be student manuscripts, which may be stand-alone short pieces or chapters from a long work. We will explore structure, tone, narrative stance, sequencing, and the art of both doing research and incorporating it artfully into the writing. We will look at exemplars of the genre, as well as craft essays on Brevity.com.

CRW 550-002: GRADUATE WORKSHOP IN NONFICTION: THE ESSAY, MEMOIR, THE BRAIDED ESSAY, GESSNER D
This is a creative writing workshop that will focus on gaining deeper knowledge and practice in writing in three forms of creative nonfiction: the personal essay, memoir, and the braided essay. We will dedicate a third of the term to each sub-genre, and, with luck, will each produce some work in each, feeling how the forms are both alike and different. We will also read examples of each. Our books for the term will be Philip Lopate's The Art of the Personal Essay, Jo Anne Beard's The Boys of MyYouth, and Tobias Wolff's This Boy's Life.

CRW 550-003: CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP, with Visiting Writer Bill Roorbach
Thursdays at 3:30pm
2/11, 2/18, 2/25 and 3/3/2016

CRW 560-001,-002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor.Please write Emily Louise Smithfor permission to register for this course.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a boutique literary press and provides hands-on experience in evaluating manuscripts, copyediting, proofreading, designing book interiors and pitching cover concepts, pitching publicity and marketing, social media management, grant writing, and the production of promotional materials for the imprint. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: WRITING THE OUTSIDER, CHAI M
In this multi-genre class, we will examine how writers have centered experiences that are often pushed to the margins of the mainstream. While examining the forms, literary aesthetics, and craft of various novels, short stories, poems, films, and works of creative nonfiction, we will also explore the larger theme of "writing the outsider." What does it mean to feel like an outsider, whether because of race, socioeconomic class, gender, sexual orientation, physical ability, religion, identity (ethnic/national/regional), historical marginalization, or other factors? How does one write to express a truth that may not always be recognized by one's peers while creating empathy in the reader? How does one center this material to allow the reader access to this perspective? Students will also have opportunities to respond with their own short, creative pieces to experiment with form and genre and to generate ideas for new works.

Fall 2015

CRW 503-001: CREATIVE WRITING PEDAGOGY, BRENNER W
This course doubles as pedagogy seminar and the weekly staff meeting for new teaching assistants (GTA and DIS) teaching CRW 201. The course provides you with a wealth of materials and resources for your teaching career here at UNCW and beyond. Class meetings serve as a forum in which to share and address your ongoing teaching experiences, questions, successes, and challenges. Occasional guest speakers will include experienced TAs and professors. We will also read and discuss a range of articles about pedagogical theory and methods, with an eye toward developing your own teaching philosophy and methodology. You will write one personal essay at semester's end, reflecting on both your 201 experience and your ideas for future classes.

CRW 523-001: BOOKBUILDING, STAPLES B
This course offers intensive hands-on training in book design and production using desktop publishing technologies. Students develop skills through a progressively more complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work, in a small edition (which they take with them, along with completed digital files of their work for later reprinting). Students should gain from this course basic software skills, a heightened design aesthetic, and an understanding of how books are built and produced, manuscript to bookshelf.

CRW 524-001,-004: ECOTONE LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS A
[Please write Anna Lena Phillips for permission to register for this course.] This is a practical course in the publication of our national literary journal, Ecotone. The coursework will consist of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. We will concern ourselves with the business of running a magazine, including editorial, production, and some design, as well as marketing and grants research. We will divide ourselves into smaller teams early in the semester, based on genre. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing practical business of the magazine. In addition, each student will subscribe to and review one of a set of print literary magazines and will follow and review one online-only magazine. There may be the opportunity to write for the Ecotone blog. Recommended texts: Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition; The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-002,-003: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY MAGAZINE, GERARD P
[Permission of Instructor Required] This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on a developmental editing projects, assist and participate in design process, and act as team leaders, mentoring undergraduate students. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. Students work in teams - with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit. Variable credit (1 to 3 hours) possible for graduate students.

CRW 525-001: THE BUSINESS OF BEING A WRITER, SMITH E
This course offers writers an introduction to literary publishing in the 21st century. Rather than dividing the art from the business, we'll explore how each informs the other, and how writers have proven savvy at making a living from their art. We'll begin by studying the stages in publishing a book, as well as related issues in the field-the conglomeratization of the industry and burgeoning of small presses, the current book-buying marketplace, creative promotions, libel and copyright, and contracts and royalty structures, among other topics. We'll then develop strategies for building your platform: establishing a website and social network, submitting essays and stories to quality magazines, writing for digital media, and giving readings and talks, as well as other meaningful ways to engage your target audience. Finally, we'll review sample proposals and pitch letters. Each student will develop a draft of his or her own book proposal, or a query letter and sample chapters, as well as a list of prospective agents and presses. Applying your newly gained knowledge, you'll help evaluate the viability of each class member's proposal and offer thoughtful feedback. Industry professionals will join us as guests throughout the semester.

CRW 525-002: SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLISHING-MARKETING & PUBLICITY,
with visiting publishing professional Michael Taeckens
[1-credit course to be offered in September]

This course is designed to give students an in-depth look at the ins and outs of marketing and promoting books. Students will follow the lifespan of a book's publication process from the beginning of a marketing campaign through the end of a publicity campaign, and will get hands-on experience working on individual and group projects. We'll cover the fundamentals of marketing and publicity: how they differ and overlap, how they fit within the publishing infrastructure, how they've changed over time, and how they are instrumental in spreading buzz. Additionally, we'll explore the marketing and publicity campaigns of various books, including Lookout's Honey from the Lion as a primary model, as well as Graywolf'sThe Empathy Exams and Riverhead's The Girl on the Train, among others. Marketing and publicity directors from various presses will participate in discussions with us via Skype.

CRW 540-001: WRITERS' WEEK FALL 2015, GESSNER D
This one-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers' Week. This year Writers' Week will feature writers from Ecotone and this class will have an emphasis on writing from place, including some writing exercises focused on place. But most of the work will be practical and focused on preparation for the week, which will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with one of the seven visiting writers who will be in residence. BFA students will conference with MFA program students or alumni. Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week. As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 10 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 542-001: WRITER AS TRANSLATOR: A POETRY TRANSLATION WORKSHOP, MÖRLING M
Octavio Paz said: "Translation is an art of analogy, the art of finding correspondences. An art of shadows and echoes…" Charles Baudelaire said that poetry is essentially analogy. The idea of universal correspondence comes from the idea that language is a micro cosmos, a double of the universe. Between the language of the universe and the universe of language, there is a bridge, a link: poetry. The poet, says Baudelaire, is the translator."
In this class we will read and compare multiple translations of single poems and examine the choices and strategies of translation. In addition, each student in the class will also provide weekly contributions of his or her own translation of given poems and passages of prose. These translations will serve as focal points for the larger subject of translation, that of the writer as translator. Readings will include selections from Swedish, German, French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Eastern European, Spanish and South American poets and writers. Knowledge of a second language is welcome but not necessary.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, COX M
Though it is essentially a craft-oriented workshop wherein poets will critique and encourage each other's work, I am also planning to make room for a number of in-class writing exercises, many based on imitation. I will tailor these exercises in process and revision to the group's needs. I will provide individualized reading lists. Student products will include a portfolio of eight finished poems, plus revision drafts. The journal will consist of: a) responses to reading assignments in modern and contemporary poetry and poetics; b) process exercises; and c) extensive research into a craft concept of your choice.

CRW 543-001: FORMS OF POETRY, WHITE M
This course will be a tour of some of the major forms of poetry. We will study both English language and international received forms such as blank verse, the sonnet, the ghazal, and the pantoum, and then write poems in response. Although I'd like for each student to master prosody and write distinctively and successfully in each form, this class will not be about learning the "rules," but about how to understand and cultivate some of the magical properties of each poetic form in one's own writing. Expectations will include writing several poems in various traditions, including a poem in open or experimental form, as well as a short presentation and short (5 page) essay on a poetic tradition of your choice.


CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, LEE R


CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, GERARD P


CRW 546-001: WORKSHOP LONG FORM NARRATIVE I, EDGERTON C
First semester of two semester course and goal is to have draft of fiction or nonfiction book by end of second semester. Timelines and due pages will be designed on an individual basis, but expect something in the line of 20 - 30 pages a month. Among potential class and individual activities--in addition to workshopping chapters and scenes: 1) discussing your book's plot, scenes, characters, and theme, 2) discussions of literary theory, 3) discussion of technique in fiction and nonfiction, 4) discussions of readings (from among other books, Paris Review Interviews, Mystery and Manners, Civilization and Its Discontents), 5) dramatic reading of scenes.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION, DE GRAMONT M
From News to Novel. In this class we will read novels based on actual events and people. Books such as Loving Frank by Nancy Horan, American Wife by Curtis Sittenfeld, The Giants House by Elizabeth McCracken, and Cape Fear Rising by Philip Gerard will be on the syllabus. We will explore how our imaginations can expand and deepen a reader's understanding of events, and discuss what kind of liberties an author can take when turning truth into fiction. Students will also conceive of and develop their own idea for a novel based on an event or person that fascinates them.

CRW 550-001: WORKSHOP CREATIVE NONFICTION, CHAI M
In this workshop, students will have the opportunity to explore the rich possibilities of creative nonfiction in multiple forms. Students will receive feedback on their original works of creative nonfiction in a traditional workshop format. We will also discuss and analyze works by established writers of literary journalism, memoir, personal essays, lyric essays and other works to look at technique, aesthetics, and narrative choices. In addition to writing exercises and critique letters, students will turn in two original works of creative nonfiction and one significant revision.

CRW 550-002: WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, FURIA P
Students will write and workshop two original essays or chapters in any genre of creative nonfiction-memoir, lyric essay, biography, nature writing, etc. One work must involve research (library, archival, and/or internet) and interviews with at least two people. Students will also write a "pitch" letter to a literary agent about one of the pieces or the larger work from which it comes.

CRW 560-001,-002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a boutique literary press and provides hands-on experience in evaluating manuscripts, copyediting, proofreading, designing book interiors and pitching cover concepts, publicity planning, marketing, social media management, grant writing, and production of promotional materials for the imprint. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: FOOD WRITING, SIEGEL R
What are we talking about when we talk about food-and cooking, and eating, and feeding others? This course will sample a range of fiction and nonfiction exploring that vast and complicated subject. Possibilities include A.J. Liebling, Ruth Reichl, M.F.K Fischer, Isek Dinesen, Margaret Atwood, Ma Jian (The Noodle Maker), David Wong Louie (The Barbarians Are Coming), Jim Crace (The Devil's Larder), and John Lanchester (The Debt to Pleasure). There will be one major creative project and possibly other short assignments, but the emphasis will be on fast-paced, rigorous reading and discussion.

CRW 580-002: GRAPHIC NOVEL, GESSNER D
The main goals of this class are to give you an overview of the genre of graphic novels and to give you a language to discuss this emerging form. To achieve these goals we will read from a broad, though admittedly far from comprehensive, range of graphic novels. Secondarily, we will work on our own graphic projects. It should be stressed that no art background is required for this. Stick figures are okay.

Spring 2015

CRW 524-001,-003,-004: ECOTONE LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS A L
Permission of instructor required. This is a practical course in the publication of our national literary journal, Ecotone. The coursework consists of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. We will divide ourselves into smaller teams early in the semester, based on genre. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing practical business of the magazine in the realms of editorial, production, marketing, research, and some design. Students will also have the opportunity to write posts for the Ecotone/Lookout Books blog. In addition, we will cultivate an understanding of where Ecotone sits in the literary landscape: students will read and review at least one prior issue of Ecotone, subscribe to and review a print literary magazine, and follow and review an online-only magazine. Ecotone student editors should register for 524-003. Recommended texts: Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition; The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-002: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL (1-3 credits), GERARD P
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on editing and fact-checking, tackle marketing/sales issues, and provide leadership for an undergraduate team. Each team will present regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 525-001: DEVELOPMENTAL EDITING (SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLISHING), PHILLIPS A LThis course provides an introduction to the art and craft of developmental editing, a skill useful on the job market as well as in improving one's own writing. We will focus on editing for nonfiction, fiction, and poetry for magazine and book publishers. Topics will include proposal development, narrative, argument, and voice, as well as editing for style and substantive editing at the line level. We will explore how to create and maintain collegial relationships throughout the editing process, and work to gain an understanding of how developmental editing fits within the publishing process overall. Students will be evaluated via individual and group editing projects and a final portfolio. Course texts will include Developmental Editing, by Scott Norton, and the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, WHITE M
This will be a hybrid workshop offering instruction, support, and dialogue in the craft of writing and revising poems. The course will adopt an ekphrastic theme, although the term will be taken broadly. We'll read and write poems and/or other forms that are inspired not only by paintings, but also by film, sculpture, and other arts. The emphasis will be to see, to engage, to hold aesthetic discourse, and we'll move beyond the workshop to include museum and studio visits, film viewings, and a public reading. Grade will be based 50% on a final portfolio of finished work and 50% on participation.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, MORLING M
In this poetry workshop we will focus on the process of writing, the different ways of analyzing a poem and on how to listen with an open mind to a critique of your own work. We will focus on the process of revision and discuss the many approaches and ways to revise a poem. Is it possible for instance, to approach a revision the way one would a translation? How do you transform a poem without destroying its urgency and original spirit? How do you arrive at a poem in its ultimate form? Everyone is required to submit a raw and freshly written poem every week. The aim of this class is also for everyone to learn to become comfortable bringing in poems that are rough without making excuses for them.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP with Aimee Nezhukumatahil (1 credit)

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, EDGERTON C

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, DE GRAMONT M
In this class, students will work on craft through close reading of each other's fiction in a workshop format. Students will write two new and original pieces for workshop and revise one of these pieces substantially. Reading assignments will be based on issues that arise during workshops.

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, CHAI M
In this class, we will be reading multiple forms of creative nonfiction in order to explore the exciting and varied possibilities of the genre. We will be reading personal essays, narrative journalism/research literary nonfiction, memoir, graphic memoir, lyric essays, and prose poetry. We may also examine several documentary films. This class will primarily focus on reading and discussing the assigned works in depth. There will be a few short writing exercises so that students may write creative responses as well as a reading responses that critically analyze the works and a final essay. Writers studied include Alison Bechdel, Sherman Alexie, Maxine Chernoff, Donna de la Perrière, Joan Didion, Mahvish Kahn, Jamaica Kincaid, David Sedaris, and Patti Smith, among others.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION, LEE R

CRW 548-001: WRITING THE NOVEL II, GERARD P
This course builds on the foundation laid by CRW 546: Writing the Novel I.* The goal is for each member of workshop to produce a solid beginning of a viable novel (fiction or nonfiction) then to exploit that beginning with several chapters of lively, original writing that advances the story and its themes- both text and subtext. Whether this particular novel ultimately succeeds or fails, the goal is to get far enough along in this course that the writer can and will finish it, thus learning how to handle the arc, scope, and scale of the long form of narrative prose. Each writer in class will hand in working drafts of the opening chapter (s) and at least one other significant passage from the novel-in-progress. There is no precise word count, but shoot for something in the neighborhood of 10,000- 15,000 words (40-50 pages) total. Attached to the first handout should be your one-sentence logline of the main focus of the novel. Each student will also turn in two copies of signed, written comments- one to the author whose work is under discussion, the other to the instructor.
*A student who has not taken 546 may enroll with instructor's permission; please contact instructor prior to the end of Fall semester.

CRW 550-001: GRADUATE WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, GESSNER D
The theme of this workshop is "Just Write." We are going to focus on putting pen to page, with minimal reading and maximum time spent actually writing. To this end one hour of each class will be dedicated to either writing prompts or individual writing projects, with a maximum of two workshops per class. We will keep track of our weekly output through recording either our hours or page production. There will be reading but it will be self-assigned, with a focus on books that can serve as models and/or inspirations.

CRW 550-002: GRADUATE WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, HOLMAN V
In this workshop-based class, students will submit two new works of creative nonfiction. Creative nonfiction is a flexible form, and submissions may include memoir, lyric/hybrid forms, familiar essay, reportage, etc. Workshops will address issues of craft as well as hidden possibilities. The instructor will provide short readings throughout the semester that address specific issues of craft, and offer exercises to encourage new work and experimentation.

CRW 550-003: GRADUATE WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION with Patricia Hample (1 credit)

CRW 560-001,-002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a boutique literary press and provides hands-on experience in evaluating manuscripts, copyediting, proofreading, designing book interiors and pitching cover concepts, publicity, social media management, marketing, grant writing, and producing promotional materials for the imprint. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: BORDER CROSSINGS: CONTEMPORARY TRAVEL WRITING, SIEGEL R
What is travel writing? How do we define it? Does travel have to be geographic, for example? Or can it be cultural or social-vertical, rather than horizontal? This course explores travel writing of the last thirty years, with particular interest in the way boundaries blur and aesthetic strategies multiply as the genre explodes outward in a globalizing world. Readings include fiction and nonfiction by Ben Lerner, Nell Freudenberger, Pico Iyer, Liao Yiwu, and others. One creative project.

CRW 580-003: NARRATIVE METHODS IN FILM, BRENNER W
In this course we will spend the great majority of our time watching and discussing films, primarily but not exclusively documentaries, focusing on how their narratives (stories) are shaped, how narrators and characters earn our sympathy (or not), and other issues relevant to writing fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. We'll also read playwright Sarah Ruhl's new book,100 Essays I Don't Have Time to Write. One personal essay due at semester's end. Films will likely include the following: Capturing The Friedmans, Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer, Moving Midway, The Eyes of Tammy Faye,The Red Shoes, A Matter of Life and Death, Altman's Three Women, De Palma's Sisters, and Errol Morris's Fast, Cheap, & Out of Control. Note: This course is as an elective, not a workshop. The course does not include screenwriting.

Fall 2014

CRW 503-001: CREATIVE WRITING PEDAGOGY, BRENNER W
This course doubles as pedagogy seminar and the weekly staff meeting for new teaching assistants (GTA and DIS) teaching CRW 201. The course provides you with a wealth of materials and resources for your teaching career here at UNCW and beyond. Class meetings serve as a forum in which to share and address your ongoing teaching experiences, questions, successes, and challenges. Occasional guest speakers will include experienced TAs and professors. We will also read and discuss a range of articles about pedagogical theory and methods, with an eye toward developing your own teaching philosophy and methodology. You will write one personal essay at semester's end, reflecting on both your 201 experience and your ideas for future classes.

CRW 523-001: BOOKBUILDING, STAPLES B
This course offers intensive hands-on training in book design and production using desktop publishing technologies. Students develop skills through a progressively more complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work, in a small edition (which they take with them, along with completed digital files of their work for later reprinting). Students should gain from this course basic software skills, a heightened design aesthetic, and an understanding of how books are built and produced, manuscript to bookshelf.

CRW 524-001: ECOTONE LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS A
This is a practical course in the publication of our national literary journal, Ecotone. The coursework will consist of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. We will concern ourselves with the business of running a magazine, including editorial, production, and some design, as well as marketing and, to a certain extent, sales. Editorially speaking, we will divide ourselves into smaller teams early in the semester, based on genre. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing practical business of the magazine. Recommended texts: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition; Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit. Permission of instructor required to enroll; email Anna Lena Phillips at phillipsal@uncw.edu.

CRW 524-002: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY MAGAZINE, GERARD P
[Permission of Instructor Required] This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on a developmental editing projects, assist and participate in design process, and act as team leaders, mentoring undergraduate students. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. Students work in teams - with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work.
Course may be repeated for credit. Variable credit (1 to 3 hours) possible for graduate students.

CRW 525-001: COPYEDITING, PHILLIPS A
This course provides a thorough introduction to the art and craft of copyediting, a skill useful on the job market as well as in substantive editing of both others' and one's own work. We will focus on editing for magazine and book publishers-and will thus spend a good deal of time with the Chicago Manual of Style-but we will also consider other settings for copyediting. In addition to marking copy by hand and on screen, we will explore how to create and maintain collegial relationships throughout the editing process, with the goal of improving proficiency in what Carol Fisher Saller calls "working through the writer for the reader." We will consider levels of editing; freelance and in-house editorial processes; making and using style sheets; effective use of style guides; and the finer points of grammar and usage. Students will be evaluated via quizzes (including editing tests similar to those given by publishers), editing projects, and a final portfolio. Texts: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition; The Copyeditor's Handbook, 3rd edition, by Amy Einsohn; the AP Stylebook, 2014 edition; The Subversive Copyeditor, by Carol Fisher Saller.

CRW 540-001: WRITERS WEEK FALL 2014, GESSNER D
This one-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers' Week. This year Writers' Week will feature writers from Ecotone and this class will have an emphasis on writing from place, including some writing exercises focused on place. But most of the work will be practical and focused on preparation for the week, which will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with one of the seven visiting writers who will be in residence. BFA students will conference with MFA program students or alumni. Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week. As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 10 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 542-001: WRITER AS TRANSLATOR: A TRANSLATION WORKSHOP, MORLING M
Octavio Paz said: "Translation is an art of analogy, the art of finding correspondences. An art of shadows and echoes…" Charles Baudelaire said that poetry is essentially analogy. The idea of universal correspondence comes from the idea that language is a micro cosmos, a double of the universe. Between the language of the universe and the universe of language, there is a bridge, a link: poetry. The poet, says Baudelaire, is the translator."
In this class we will read and compare multiple translations of single poems and examine the choices and strategies of translation. In addition, each student in the class will also provide weekly contributions of his or her own translation of given poems and passages of prose. These translations will serve as focal points for the larger subject of translation, that of the writer as translator. Readings will include selections from Swedish, German, French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Eastern European, Spanish and South American poets and writers. Knowledge of a second language is welcome but not necessary.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, WHITE M
This will be a traditional workshop offering instruction, support, and dialogue in the craft of writing and revising poems. Our readings will include books by poets from Larry Levis to Tracy K. Smith. Students will write in response to the readings, and we'll follow customary protocol in verbal and written peer review. We will also focus on the architecture of individual collections, and seek to apply lessons learned to each student's own aesthetic. Grade will be based 50% on a final portfolio of at least six polished poems, 25% on participation, and 25% on an essay on one of our texts.

CRW 544-001 FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, BENDER K
This workshop will focus on issues of revision, with students turning on one story and revising it over the course of the semester. We will read and discuss participants' work.

CRW 544-002 FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, SIEGEL R
A workshop focused on the reading and discussion of participants' work. Equal emphasis will be placed on matters of craft and process. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 546-001: WORKSHOP IN WRITING THE NOVEL, GERARD P
This is the first of a year-long two-course suite (with CRW 548) that addresses writing a prose book, either fiction or nonfiction. Students are encouraged, but not required, to take both courses back to back in fall and spring. Texts: On Becoming a Novelist by John Gardner and student manuscripts. Novels don't just spring full-blown onto the page- they rely on a complex architecture of scene and chapter in order to create a sense of expectation and fulfillment for the reader over the long haul. We will address the elements of narrative design in the long form, as well as the indispensable work of preparation, research, and pre-writing that allow for adventure, mystery, and surprise to occur in the actual writing. We will revisit such maligned practices as composing an outline and redefine misunderstood terms such as "suspense" in order to create aesthetic limits within which unlimited artistry is possible. Students will write in a directed way toward their novels- notes, sketches, a declaration that captures the essence of their fascination with the situation of the story, an outline, and at least one chapter. We will also begin the process of developing a book trailer.

CRW 550-001: WORKSHOP CREATIVE NONFICTION, CHAI M
In this workshop, students will have the opportunity to explore the rich possibilities of creative nonfiction in multiple forms. Students will receive feedback on their original works of creative nonfiction in a traditional workshop format. We will also discuss and analyze works by established writers of literary journalism, memoir, personal essays, lyric essays and other works to look at technique, aesthetics, and narrative choices. In addition to writing exercises and critique letters, students will turn in two original works of creative nonfiction and one significant revision.

CRW 550-002: WORKSHOP CREATIVE NONFICTION, GESSNER D
This is a workshop in creative nonfiction with a special emphasis on writing about place. We will explore the role that writing about places--sometimes natural places, sometimes not--can play in writing personal essays and memoir. For nonfiction writers who are stuck for a subject, place often unlocks other topics and deeper concerns. Places and words have always been intertwined and for some writers turning their minds to a specific place they care for-a home, a patch of woods, a beach-can prove a reliable muse.
At the same time, writing about deeply knowing a place can make us feel a little mystical, even silly. As the great Alaskan writer John Haines said: "To express a place in art we need to take certain risks...we need intimacy of a sort that demands a certain daring and risk: a surrender, an abandonment." Or as Barry Lopez puts it, we need to "become vulnerable to a place."
We'll attempt this in our work and our reading.

CRW 560-001, 002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a small literary press and provides hands-on experience in evaluating manuscripts, copyediting, proofreading, designing book interiors and pitching cover concepts, publicity, social media management, marketing, grant writing, and producing promotional materials for the imprint. [MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.]

CRW 580-001: WOMEN POETS AND THE PULITZER PRIZE, ADAMS L
We will examine the work of numerous celebrated poets, beginning with selected readings by early winners of this prestigious prize, and culminating with the more recent full-length collections. Texts will include the following: Mueller, Alive Together; Sexton, Live or Die; Kumin, Up Country; Oliver, American Primitive; Kizer, Yin; Dove, Thomas & Beulah; Glück, The Wild Iris; Emerson, Late Wife; Trethewey, Native Guard; Smith, Life on Mars; Olds, Stag's Leap. Grade will include two analytical essays (midterm and final), as well as oral presentations.

CRW 580-002: YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE, DE GRAMONT N
In this course, we will read classic and contemporary Young Adult novels from Judy Blume to Laurie Halse Anderson. We'll discuss the novels paying special attention to craft and content, as well as how work geared toward teens differs from work geared toward adults. In addition to in-class exercises, students will write an outline and sample chapters for their own Young Adult Novel.

CRW 580-003: CROSSROADS: RACE, CULTURE & SOUTHERN LITERATURE, EDGERTON C
We will read non-fiction and fiction sources related to our topic. Included will be histories, documentary works, novels, short stories and essays.We will also view selected films, conduct interviews with several authors of the works we read, and take field trips.Finally, after discussions and analysis, we will write essays about the topic and these essays will be included in a collection produced by the class.

CRW 580-004: TRAVEL NARRATIVES: THE ART OF THE JOURNEY, CHAI M
This mixed-genre class will examine the narrative art of depicting journeys in creative nonfiction, poetry, fiction, and film, including works by Joan Didion, Lixin Fan, Gao Xingjian, Roxane Gay, lê thi diem thúy, Julie Otsuka, W.G. Sebald, and Luis Alberto Urrea, among others. We will read/watch and discuss the works, analyzing them for craft, content, and aesthetic sensibilities. Students will also have opportunities to respond with their own short, creative pieces to experiment with form and genre.

Spring 2014


CRW 501-001: RESEARCH FOR CREATIVE WRITERS, GERARD P
Research is a creative process in its own right that not only helps authenticate a piece of writing but also can yield new possibilities for projects in all genres. We will explore not only the conventional tools of research-- e.g. the interview and the print archive-- but more imaginative and unconventional methods of finding out public or personal information that yields exciting creative opportunities. Each student will design a research agenda tailored to his or her work in progress. Such work may be new to the class or a continuation of a project already begun. Our focus will be both practical and aestheticClass sessions will include discussion of methods, planning, and reporting on the progress of various research activities. Each student will present a final project-- a partial or completed manuscript, depending on genre and scope -- that incorporates research conducted during the course. Such a ms. might be a cycle of poems, a portion of a novel, a short story, a personal essay, or some other form determined in consultation with the instructor.

CRW 524-001: ECOTONE LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS A
[Permission of instructor required.] This is a practical course in the publication of our national literary journal, Ecotone. The coursework will consist of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. We will concern ourselves with the business of running a magazine, including editorial, production, and some design, as well as marketing and grants research. We will divide ourselves into smaller teams early in the semester, based on genre. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing practical business of the magazine. In addition, each student will subscribe to one of a set of print literary magazines and will follow one online-only magazine. Recommended texts: Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition; The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-002: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY MAGAZINE, WILSON H
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions,work on a developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams - with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work.
Course may be repeated for credit. Variable credit (1 to 3 hours) possible for graduate students.

CRW 525-001: SPECIAL TOPICS: COPYEDITING, PHILLIPS A
This course provides a thorough introduction to the art and craft of copyediting, a skill useful on the job market as well as in substantive editing of both others' and one's own work. We will focus on editing for magazine and book publishers-and will thus spend a good deal of time with the Chicago Manual of Style-but we will also consider other settings for copyediting. In addition to marking copy by hand and on screen, we will explore how to create and maintain collegial relationships throughout the editing process, with the goal of improving proficiency in what Carol Fisher Saller calls "working through the writer for the reader." We will consider levels of editing; freelance and in-house editorial processes; making and using style sheets; effective use of style guides; and the finer points of grammar and usage. Students will be evaluated via quizzes (including editing tests similar to those given by publishers), editing projects, and a final portfolio. Texts: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition; The Copyeditor's Handbook, 3rd edition, by Amy Einsohn; The Subversive Copyeditor, by Carol Fisher Saller.

CRW 530-001: SCREENWRITING, HACKLER C
This course is an introduction to the art and craft of screenwriting. Students will develop an original story idea, create a plot outline, and write and revise the first act of a feature screenplay. The course will cover such topics as characterization, goal, conflict, and dramatic structure, and will include a series of exercises designed to help you develop and write motion picture scripts.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, COX M
Though it is essentially a craft-oriented workshop wherein poets will critique and encourage each other's work, I am also planning to make room for a number of in-class writing exercises. I will tailor these exercises in process and revision to the group's needs. I will provide individualized reading lists. Student products will include a portfolio of nine finished poems, plus revision drafts. The journal will consist of: a) responses to reading assignments in modern and contemporary poetry and poetics; b) process exercises; and c) extensive research into a craft concept of your choosing.

CRW 542-002: BOOK LENGTH POETRY, MESSER S
The second-half of a year-long course, run as a workshop, focusing on your own writing. This second-half will focus on shaping, revising, and polishing a completed manuscript. At the end of the semester we will also discuss where to send out your book and how contests, presses, etc. work for poets.

CRW 542-003: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP with visiting writer A. Van Jordan (1 credit)

CRW 543-001: FORMS OF POETRY, WHITE M
To some extent, this course will proceed as a tour of major received forms and traditions. As a way of studying both English language and international received forms such as blank verse, the sonnet, the ghazal and the pantoum, we will read poems and essays, and then write original poems and prose in response. Although each student will master prosody and write distinctively and successfully in each form, this class will not be about learning the "rules," but about how to understand, assimilate, and cultivate some of the magical properties of poetic form in one's own writing. Each student will write six poems in six different poetic forms (to be workshopped in class), as well as a craft essay on a poetic tradition of your choice.

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, SACHS D
Through close reading of published fiction and in-depth analysis of individual student work, this class will focus on both the creation of new fiction and the task of revising it. Students will submit two pieces of fiction, either short stories or selections from novels, which the class will then discuss in a workshop setting. The semester will culminate in students submitting a substantial revision of one of these pieces.

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, LEE R

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION BRENNER, W
This is a reading & discussion course (an elective, not a writing workshop) in which we will explore narrative methods, strategies, decisions, effects, etc. in recently published creative nonfiction and some documentary films, with an eye toward how we might borrow and incorporate techniques in our own work.We'll focus primarily on memoir, autobiography, and biography (both short- and long-form), though many of the texts we'll consider don't fall easily into any category. Books will include Was This Man A Genius? (Julie Hecht), Truth & Beauty: A Friendship (Ann Patchett), Autobiography of a Face (Lucy Grealy), Goat (Brad Land), The Orchid Thief (Susan Orlean), Pulphead (John Jeremiah Sullivan), The Bullfighter Checks Her Makeup (Susan Orlean), Working (Studs Terkel), and Edie: An American Girl (Jean Stein and George Plimpton). Films may include Moving Midway, Capturing The Friedmans, Catfish, The Eyes of Tammy Faye, and various Errol Morris selections. Students will write one long personal essay in response to the course materials, due at semester's end.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION, DE GRAMONT N
In this course, we will read and discuss novels with attention to content and style, paying particular attention to the way long form fiction has evolved over the years. Students will write responses analyzing the novels in terms of craft and also write short creative exercises responding to the novels.

CRW 548-002: WORKSHOP, WRITING THE NOVEL II, EDGERTON C
The is the second semester of a two-semester course. By the end of this semester you will have a draft of a novel or nonfiction book (if you already have a first draft-a later draft).Among potential class activities--in addition to workshopping chapters and scenes are:discussing your novel's plot, scenes, characters, and theme;discussions of literary theory;discussion of technique in fiction;discussions of readings;dramatic reading of scenes.

CRW 550-002: GRADUATE WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, BRENNER W
This is a traditional workshop-format course in which student work is our primary text. Students will hand in a minimum of two pieces of creative nonfiction (essays, chapters, excerpts) for discussion, critique, and/or conference w/ instructor. I am especially interested in the potential and possibilities of your work, and in locating those moments that feel most urgent and unforgettable for the reader, what makes an editor have no choice but to publish it, what makes a piece of writing feel alive and full of heart. We will also read recently published short works of creative nonfiction, distributed in class. Goals in the class are two-fold: to provide feedback, mentoring, and support for individual students and their projects, and to illuminate issues of narrative craft, form, and technique in general.

CRW 550-003: CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING WORKSHOP with visiting writer Hope Edelman (1 credit)

CRW 560-001,-002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a small literary press and provides hands-on experience in evaluating manuscripts, copyediting, proofreading, designing book covers and interiors, publicity, social media, marketing,grant writing,and producing promotional materials for the imprint. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

Fall 2013


CRW 503-001: CREATIVE WRITING PEDAGOGY, LEE R
Analysis of current theories of creative writing pedagogy and classroom practices; examination of teaching and learning theories related to the workshop model, process exercises, revision techniques, and the group dynamics of teaching creative writing. Enrollment is mandatory for and limited to graduate teaching assistants.

CRW 523-001: BOOKBUILDING, STAPLES B
This course offers intensive hands-on training in book design and production using desktop publishing technologies. Students develop skills through a progressively more complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work, in a small edition (which they take with them, along with completed digital files of their work for later reprinting). Students should gain from this course basic software skills, a heightened design aesthetic, and an understanding of how books are built and produced, manuscript to bookshelf.

CRW 524-002: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY MAGAZINE, GERARD J
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions,work on a developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams - with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work.
Course may be repeated for credit. Variable credit (1 to 3 hours) possible for graduate students.

CRW 524-003: ECOTONE LITERARY MAGAZINE, PHILLIPS A
This is a practical course in the publication of our national literary journal, Ecotone. The coursework will consist of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. We will concern ourselves with the business of running a magazine, including editorial, production, and some design, as well as marketing and, to a certain extent, sales. Editorially speaking, we will divide ourselves into smaller teams early in the semester, based on genre. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing practical business of the magazine. Recommended texts: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition; Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 530-001: POEM INTO STORY/STORY INTO POEM, COX M
An exploration of lyrical and narrative influences in the poetry and prose of such writers as Robert Penn Warren, Denis Johnson, and Raymond Carver, We will compare their poetry and prose to study how proficiency in one genre might enhance another. Students will also experiment with practical attempts to adapt their own writing from one genre to another.

CRW 540-001: WRITERS' WEEK FALL 2013, COX M
This one-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers' Week. The week will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with one of the seven visiting writers who will be in residence during the week. BFA students will conference with MFA program students or alumni. Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week. As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 10 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 542-001: BOOK-LENGTH POETRY, MESSER S
This year long course is run as a workshop with a focus on the long-form in poetry - series poems, chapbooks, full length collections. Students will bring in series of 3-5 poems for each workshop, and discussion will include the global project and how the new poems fit, or do not fit into the poet's larger work. We will also be reading a variety of poetry books by way of example. Discussions will include: what makes a great poetry book? How does order and arrangement change the meaning of a book? The course will begin with trouble-shooting, idea-generation, and group discussion for possible book projects. Later in the semester the class will proceed together in supporting the process of writing a full-length book. The goal of the course: generating a full-length poetry book (50-100 pages) in one year's time. Students are encouraged to take the course both semesters.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, MÖRLING M
In this poetry workshop we will focus on the process of writing, the different ways of analyzing a poem and on how to listen with an open mind to a critique of your own work. We will focus on the process of revision and discuss the many approaches and ways to revise a poem. Is it possible for instance, to approach a revision the way one would a translation? How do you transform a poem without destroying its urgency and original spirit? How do you arrive at a poem in its ultimate form and visionary realization? Everyone is required to submit a raw and freshly written poem every week. The aim of this class is also for everyone to learn to become comfortable bringing in poems that are rough without making excuses for them.

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, DE GRAMONT M
In this class, students will work on craft through close reading of each other's fiction in a workshop format. Students will write two new and original pieces for workshop and revise one of these pieces substantially. Reading assignments will be based on issues that arise during workshops.

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP with JASON MOTT
Wednesdays 3:30-6:15pm (one month, 1 credit course: 10/2, 10/9, 10/16 and 10/23)

CRW 544-003: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, BOYAJIAN M
A traditional workshop class based primarily on student work. Each student is responsible for submitting 3 pieces of fiction (short stories, novel chapters), and for fully participating in every aspect of the workshop process. This includes a close reading of each other's work, and thoughtful, supportive feedback both in the classroom and in written critiques.

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, MESSER S
'Just think what it would mean,' Ferenczi wrote to Freud in 1910, 'if one could tell everyone the truth...' from Adam Phillips, Terrors and Experts.
In 1998, concerning the popularity of memoir, Daphne Merkin wrote: "Ours is a culture addicted to exposure, to 'outing' ourselves and others." This course focuses on the history of narrative non-fiction, autobiography, the essay, the lyric essay, and memoir in America from pre-colonial era to the present. We will explore ways in which the memoir genre has developed out of the personal essay, narrative broadsides, reportage and autobiography. William Zissner once described a memoir as "a window into a life…a portion of a larger autobiography." Yet George Bernard Shaw wrote: "All autobiographies are lies … I do not mean unconscious, unintentional lies; I mean deliberate lies."
Is it possible to write a truthful memoir? How has this genre developed and where is it headed? The course will examine different approaches to the various forms of nonfiction over-time including experimental and conceptually and formally innovative works. We will also look at controversy in the genre both past and present. The goal of the class is to give students craft-based instruction in specific formal issues in the tradition of creative nonfiction.
Assignments will include original nonfiction, extensive reading, and may also include writing critiques, papers, exercises, etc. May be repeated once for credit.

CRW 546-001: WRITING THE NOVEL I, EDGERTON C
This is the first one semester course of two semesters of working toward the completion of a book-length manuscript draft-fiction or nonfiction. The second course will follow in the spring, CRW 548. We will together sound out ideas, concepts, themes, characters, situations, scenes, plots, scope, scale, and general problems of individual narratives as each student works at a steady pace toward a rough draft to be completed by the end of the second phase of the course (CRW 548). We will workshop chapters and scenes as well as "story plans." The course, in general, will resemble a fiction/nonfiction workshop with special attention to problems of the book length narrative. As appropriate, we will study structure and tone of published works.

CRW 550-001: WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, BRENNER W
This is a traditional workshop-format course in which student work is our primary text. Students will hand in two pieces of creative nonfiction (essays, thesis chapters, etc.) for discussion, critique, and/or conference w/ instructor. I am especially interested in the potential and possibilities of each piece we consider, and also in locating those moments that feel most urgent and unforgettable for the reader, what makes an editor have no choice but to publish it, what makes a piece feel alive and full of heart. We will also read recently published short works of creative nonfiction, distributed in class. Goals in the class are two-fold: to provide feedback, mentoring, and support for individual students and their projects, and to illuminate issues of narrative craft, form, and technique in general.

CRW 550-002 CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP, HOLMAN V
In this writing workshop, students will submit two pieces of creative nonfiction. We'll critically evaluate workshop pieces to illuminate hidden possibilities, and to help the author elevate the work to its highest purpose. I'll provide you with a variety of creative nonfiction readings, help you generate ideas and pages for new work through writing exercises, and address other issues of concern such as revision, editing, and publication.

CRW 560-001,002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a small literary press and provides hands-on experience in grant writing, proofreading, designing covers and interiors, publicity, marketing, and producing books and promotional materials for the imprint. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 580-001: DOCUMENTARY POETRY, ADAMS L
This course is an examination of collections that adapt historical moments into poetry. What are the challenges created by this type of endeavor? How does each poet broach his/her subject? What forms and point of view are utilized? How does the collection function as a whole? We will read the following collections: Auchter, The Wishing Tomb (Louisiana history); Bradfield, Approaching Ice (Polar exploration); Cooley, The Afflicted Girls (Salem Witch Trials); Fisher, Kettle Bottom (1920's coal Mining Wars); Jordan, Macnolia (1936 Natl. Spelling Bee); Smith, Blood Dazzler (Hurricane Katrina); Terry, Capturing the Dead (Civil War Photography); Trethewey, Bellocq's Ophelia (New Orleans's Red Light District, early 1900's), Wright, C.D. One Big Self: An Investigation. Students are responsible for completing a critical/analytical essay, and a mini-collection in the documentary genre.

CRW 580-003: THE WRITING LIFE, GESSNER D
This class will focus on all aspects of the writing life. What does it mean to live a life of writing and reading books? The course will be broken down into roughly three sections. The first will focus on the spiritual aspects of the writing life, the second on work habits and work, and the third on the practical aspects, the brass tacks, from writing a cover letter to a book proposal. But while we will end on a practical note we will keep our focus on the larger picture, and the philosophical aspects of choosing to be a writer in today's world. Our reading will include literary books on writing, biographies, and more practical writing guides.

CRW 580-004: HYBRID FORM, ABRAMS H
(Tuesdays 3:30pm-6:15pm, Kenan Hall 1112)
Baudelaire wrote in Paris Spleen, "Which one of us, in his moments of ambition, has not dreamed of the miracle of a poetic prose, musical, without rhythm and without rhyme, supple enough and rugged enough to adapt itself to the lyrical impulses of the soul, the undulations of reverie, the jibes of conscience?"
This course will explore literary texts, in both long and short form, which blur, combine, explode convention. We will examine intersections, collisions, and flashes-the novel in verse, the lyric memoir, the prose poem, micro essays, and sudden fiction. Additionally, the class will read contemporary work that walks the line between literary and popular modes. We will ask how form borrows from form, discover what can be gained by writing the in-between. Students may expect authors to include Ander Monson, David Shields, Lia Purpura, Sarah Manguso, Amy Fusselman, Brian Doyle, Anne Carson, Donald Barthelme, and the like.

Spring 2013

CRW 524-001: LITERARY MAGAZINE, GESSNER D
This is a practical course in the publication of our national literary journal, Ecotone. The course work will consist of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. We will concern ourselves with the practical business of running a magazine, including editorial, production, and some design, as well as marketing and, to a certain extent, sales. Editorially speaking, we will divide ourselves into smaller teams early in the semester, based on genre. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing practical business of the magazine. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-001: LITERARY MAGAZINE, GERARD J
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. Graduate students will serve as team leaders. Each team will present regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit. Variable credit (1 to 3 hours) possible for graduate students.

CRW 530-001: SCREENWRITING, MONAHAN D
An introduction to screenwriting format, technique and narrative style for graduate creative writing students. Students will structure a plot outline and write and revise the first act of a feature film script. All students will complete a series of exercises designed to develop various skills (character, structure, format, transitions, scenes, dialogue, etc.) and aid in the development of their script.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, WHITE M
This will be a traditional workshop offering instruction, support, and dialogue in the craft of writing and revising poems. Students are expected to submit poems to the instructor weekly, and to the class for workshop every other week. This semester, we'll adopt an ekphrastic theme, although the term will be taken broadly. We'll read and write poems inspired not only by paintings, but also by photography, sculpture, architecture, almost any outside form that invites the gaze. The point is simply to see, to engage, to hold aesthetic discourse. Grade will be based 50% on a final portfolio of at least six polished poems, and 50% on participation.

CRW 543-001: FORMS OF POETRY, COX M
A study of practical poetics focusing on free verse prosody against a background of traditional metrical prosody. Designed to help writers sharpen their sense of historical development and critical terminology, the course will aid students in preparing for the MFA examination. Format: seminar, close reading and discussion, exercises, presentations. Individualized reading; handouts in class.

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, DE GRAMONT M
In this class, students will work on craft through close reading of each other's fiction in a workshop format. Students will write two new and original pieces for workshop and revise one of these pieces substantially. Reading assignments will be based on issues that arise during workshops.

CRW 544-002: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, EDGERTON C
The instructor serves in the roles of teacher and editor. Among class activities--in addition to the workshopping of stories, book chapters, and story plans ("story plan" will be explained in class)--will be a) lecture, discussion of scene, point of view, and story "form," b) critiques of published stories, c) translations of dramatic scenes to a reader's theater format (to be explained in class) and consequent dramatic presentations. In general, the student in this class approaches fiction writing as writer, reader, critic, and translator. Students will periodically turn in stories in progress and will keep a folder (journal) of short assignments given from time to time as well as one-page critiques of each story that is workshopped. Certain activities may be added or subtracted as the class unfolds.

CRW 544-003 (1 credit): FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP WITH CRISTINA GARCIA

CRW 548-002: WORKSHOP IN WRITING THE NOVEL II, SIEGEL R
Workshop in writing long-form narrative, whether fiction or creative nonfiction. Continued from the Fall.

CRW 550-001: WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, GESSNER D
This is a workshop in nonfiction with an emphasis on new work and new forms. We will spend the first part of the term (3 weeks) trying to sparkthat new work, with a particular focus on the braided essay and writing that has a focus on place. We will also discuss other shapes and forms in the world of nonfiction, for instance the possibilities of melding journalism and memoir. Each student will be expected to workshop two pieces.

CRW 550-002: ART OF THE PERSONAL ESSAY, GERARD P
Special Workshop in Creative Writing: Writing Personally in the World.
In this workshop students will write personal narratives that draw from their own lives and also include some aspect of the larger world: social, natural, political, historical, etc. We will explore our various identities as credentials for addressing important and interesting subjects through a compelling narrative voice. To do this, we'll take on research-not as a dry exercise in finding bibliographical sources but as an exploratory adventure, part treasure hunt and part investigative reporting. We'll practice some of the best tools of research: interviewing, raiding archives, walking the ground, etc., as appropriate to each writer's projects. Assignments will include reading, writing original manuscripts, critiquing the work of peers, and offering short presentations on some aspect of research.

CRW 560-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 or 524 and permission of instructor.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions as an internship at a small literary press and provides hands-on experience in grant writing, copyediting, proofreading, design, marketing, publicity, and production of books and promotional materials for the imprint. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 580-001: LYRIC ESSAY/CROSS GENRE, MESSER S
This course operates as a forms course that investigates sub-genres, namely the prose poem, the short-short story, and the novel in verse, with a main focus on the lyric essay. We will be asking the question: what is the difference between these sub-genres? How to they intersect? What is the history and future of these forms? Text will include: Bluettes by Maggie Nelson, Autobiography of Red, and Red Doc by Anne Carson, Don't Let Me Be Lonely, by Claudia Rankine, Halls of Fame, by JohnD'Agata, The Next American Essay, (anthology) ed. by John D'Agata, Centuries, by Joel Brouwer, On Looking, by Lia Purpera, and selections from Lost Origins of the Essay and Sudden Fiction International (list is subject to change). Students will respond creatively to weekly readings and present a final creative piece in one of the forms studied.

CRW 581-001: STUDIES IN INTERNATIONAL WRITING AND TRANSLATION, MÖRLING M
Octavio Paz said: "Translation is an art of analogy, the art of finding correspondences. An art of shadows and echoes…" Charles Baudelaire said that poetry is essentially analogy. The idea of universal correspondence comes from the idea that language is a micro cosmos, a double of the universe. Between the language of the universe and the universe of language, there is a bridge, a link: poetry. The poet, says Baudelaire, is the translator." In this class we will read and compare multiple translations of single poems and examine the choices and strategies of translation. In addition, each student in the class will also provide weekly contributions of his or her own translation of given poems. These translations will serve as focal points for the larger subject of translation, that of the poet as translator. Readings will include selections from Swedish, German, French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Eastern European, Spanish and South American poets. Knowledge of a second language is welcome but not necessary.

Fall 2012


CRW 503-001: CREATIVE WRITING PEDAGOGY, GESSNER D
The goal of this course is to provide you with a wealth of materials and resources for your teaching career here at UNCW and beyond. Our weekly class meetings will follow our CRW 201 class sessions, serving as a forum in which to share and address your ongoing teaching experiences, questions, challenges and successes. From time to time, guest speakers will include experienced TAs and professors. We will also read and discuss a range of articles about pedagogical theory and methods, with an eye toward developing our own philosophies of teaching. Extensive reading and written response are required.

CRW 523-001: BOOKBUILDING, SMITH E
For students interested in the basics, this course offers intensive hands-on training in book design and production using desktop publishing software in a Macintosh lab. Students develop skills through a progressively more complex series of design projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work, in a small edition. Students should gain from this course basic software skills, a heightened design aesthetic, an understanding of how books are produced, manuscript to bookshelf, and an overview of small press publishing. The course meets for three hours a week, but students should allow additional time to complete assignments in the Publishing Lab outside of class hours.

CRW 524-001: LITERARY MAGAZINE PRACTICUM, GEORGE B
This is a practical course in the publication of our national literary journal, Ecotone. The course work will consist of reading submissions and becoming part of an editorial team that will put out an issue of the magazine. We will concern ourselves with the practical business of running a magazine, including editorial, production, marketing, and, to a certain extent, sales. Editorially speaking, we will divide ourselves into smaller teams early in the semester, based on genre. Everyone will be responsible for reading a number of manuscripts per week, and for contributing to the ongoing practical business of the magazine. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 524-002: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY MAGAZINE, GERARD J
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on a developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams - with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work.
Course may be repeated for credit. Variable credit (1 to 3 hours) possible for graduate students

CRW 540-001: WRITERS WEEK SYMPOSIUM, COX M
This course accompanies Writers Week. Students in the class will help organize the week, during which visiting writers come to campus to give reading and craft lectures. We will read the work of the visiting writers prior to their arrival, and students will conference with one of the visiting writers in their genre.

CRW 542-001: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, MÖRLING M
In this poetry workshop we will focus on the process of writing, the different ways of analyzing a poem and on how to listen with an open mind to a critique of your own work. We will focus on the process of revision and discuss the many approaches and ways to revise a poem. Is it possible for instance, to approach a revision the way one would a translation? How do you transform a poem without destroying its urgency and original spirit? How do you arrive at a poem in its ultimate form and visionary realization? Everyone is required to submit a raw and freshly written poem every week. The aim of this class is also for everyone to learn to become comfortable bringing in poems that are rough without making excuses for them.

CRW 542-002: POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP, MESSER S
This course will be run as a workshop, focusing on your own writing. Although any flavor of poetry will be accepted, I encourage students to explore something new this semester, to get outside your comfort zone. We will be looking at several books and talking about how they are put together; how they work, or don't. We will also be discussing procedural poetics...ie different approaches to the writing process itself and producing new work. Required: one new poem per week. Assigned reading. Final portfolio containing five revised poems, or one long poem, or series of poems.

CRW 544-001: FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP, BENDER K
This will be a course in revision, taking one piece and pushing it to the next level. Students will work on a draft of one piece during the semester, turning in a first draft and a second of the same story. We will do in-class and take-home exercises in which you re-vision and explore your story. We'll also read and discuss published stories, figuring out how they work.

CRW 545-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, BRENNER W
This is reading and discussion course (elective, not workshop) in which we will wade enjoyably through many books and a few documentary films, paying attention to a wide range of narrative strategies, techniques, and special effects in creative nonfiction. Book and film list will likely include: Born Standing Up (Steve Martin), Truth & Beauty (Ann Patchett), Goat (Brad Land), Just Kids (Patti Smith), The Orchid Thief (Susan Orlean), Blood Horses and Pulphead (John Jeremiah Sullivan), Edie: An American Girl (Jean Stein and George Plimpton), The Lynda Barry Experience (spoken word audio CD), Swimming to Cambodia (Spalding Gray film), and documentary films directed by Errol Morris and others. Students will write one personal essay in response to the course materials, due at semester's end.

CRW 546-001: WORKSHOP WRITING THE NOVEL I, SIEGEL R
This course is designed to help students write a novel. Topics include how to plan, research, outline and begin writing in an open, exploratory way. Discussion will also cover fundamental issues of craft and process: the relationship between character and plot; the role of voice; the importance of momentum; the crucial role of drafts; and the value of prioritizing (working big before working small). The second part of this course is offered in the spring.

CRW 547-001: FORMS OF FICTION, LEE R
Texts: The Accidental Tourist, by Anne Tyler, We Need to Talk About Kevin, by Lionel Shriver, Room, by Emma Donoghue, The Sweet Hereafter, by Russell Banks, among others. This course will study the contemporary novel, with an eye to reading as many formal choices available for writers-- maximalist/minimalist, experimental/traditional, lyrical/journalistic. We will write various imitative writing exercises, in an effort to inhabit the forms ourselves.

CRW 550-001: WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, GERARD P
In this workshop course, students will write original works and critique those works in the context of discussion of the craft of creative nonfiction writing. Each student will write thoughtful critiques of each other's work. Creative Nonfiction is an inclusive genre. Students may submit reportage, memoir, biography, personal essay, or a variety of other forms; the significant criterion is artistic excellence. In reading and critiquing, we will explore the particular requirements of certain forms, including but not limited to the personal point of view, the more effaced or objective point of view, structure, character development, subtext, and ethics. Throughout the course we will be mindful of the role of research in the most imaginative sense. The aim of the workshop is not to edit any particular manuscript into a polished form but to understand significant truths about the principles of writing in the genre, which can then be applied to every future piece of writing.

CRW 550-002: WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, BRENNER W
A traditional workshop course in which student work is our primary text. Students will hand in two pieces of creative nonfiction (essays, chapters, etc.) for discussion, critique, and/or conference w/ instructor. I am especially interested in the potential and possibilities of each piece we consider, and also in locating those moments that feel most urgent and unforgettable for the reader - what makes a piece feel alive and full of heart. We will also read recently published short works of creative nonfiction, distributed in class. Goals in the class are two-fold: to provide feedback and support for individual student work, and to illuminate issues of narrative craft, form, and technique in general.

CRW 560-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, SMITH E
[Prerequisite: CRW 523 and permission of instructor.] A select group of graduate students supports the work of Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions primarily as an internship at a small literary press and provides hands-on experience in grant writing, proofreading, designing, marketing, and producing books and promotional materials for the imprint. MFA students may repeat for credit without limit.

CRW 580-001: FORMS OF AMERICAN HUMOR, FURIA P
Historical development of American humor in a variety of forms: light verse, song lyrics, comedy, musical comedy, film, fiction, essays, memoir. Typical authors: Washington Irving, Mark Twain, Gertrude Stein, Cole Porter, Nora Ephron, David Sedaris, Garrison Keillor.

CRW 580-001: CONFESSIONAL POETRY, ADAMS L
This course is not for the squeamish, as we will read poetry that deals with alcohol and drug abuse, suicide, molestation, emotional abuse, insanity, etc. In more academic terms, this course is an examination of the Confessional Poetry movement, spanning from Robert Lowell and Ann Sexton to more contemporary practitioners. In addition to work by Lowell (Life Studies) and Sexton (selected poems), we will read collections by Kim Addonizio (Tell Me), Nick Flynn (Some Ether), Rigoberto Gonzalez (Other Fugitives and Other Strangers), Sarah Hannah (Inflorescence), Debra Nystrom (Bad River Road), Sharon Olds (One Secret Thing), Nancy Pearson (Two Minutes of Light), and Daniel Nathan Terry (Waxwings-the full-length collection). Students are responsible for brief weekly journal responses to the collections, for reading and responding to several articles, and for completing a critical/analytical essay. We will conclude the course by workshopping student work in the confessional genre.

CRW 580-003: POETRY AND ART, WHITE M
This seminar for writers in all genres will focus on the longstanding and fruitful struggle for mastery between the image and the word. Beginning with the epics of Homer, Virgil, and Dante, and concluding with several contemporary American poets, we will study each poem along with the art that inspired it. Requirements will include three projects: a research paper on a writer's response to a work of art; a presentation to the class on both the writer and the art; and finally, a creative (ekphrastic) response of your own, which we will workshop, to an art work of your choice. Texts will include James Heffernan's: Museum of Words: The Poetics of Ekphrasis from Homer to Ashbery.