Creative Writing

BFA Course Descriptions

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  • Visit catalogue.uncw.edu for catalogue course descriptions (choose current catalogue year from drop-down, then see link in left column for course descriptions).

 

Spring 2019

CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.
Sections 001-006 all meet together in MO 100 auditorium on Tuesdays at 12:30 with Melissa Crowe, then the individual sections meet on Thursdays at 12:30 in separate classrooms with the assigned GTA.


CRW 201-007: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, FLORA K

 

CRW 201-008: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, GILBERT C
In this course, we will start with the examination of poetry, then move into prose writing, both fiction and creative nonfiction. We will look at a wide variety of forms, ideas, and ways to write well, starting with found poetry and ekphrastic poems and ending with short stories and flash. We will learn about conventions and how to tear them down, with many colorful discussions along the way. This course will be discussion based, so come ready with all the ideas you can fit in a notebook. Course grades will be based primarily on participation, with weekly creative assignments and writing activities. Attendance is mandatory. The culmination of your work will be in a final portfolio containing your best writing in each genre. In the beginning, we learn the “rules” of writing so that by the end, we can successfully break them. Come prepared to have fun and write what excites and inspires you.

CRW 201-009: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, LOVING D
Text: Readings to be handed out in class.
In this course, students will read and write poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction. They will examine the works of published authors and learn skills and techniques to apply to their own writing. At the end of the semester, students will submit a portfolio containing their best work in each genre. Grading will be based on effort and a willingness on the student's part to participate in all aspects of the course: doing the assigned reading, editing rough drafts of their own work, and participating in class. Students will produce short examples of written work in each genre and longer pieces to be workshopped by their peers. Attendance is crucial.

 

CRW 201-010: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, MUSICK M

 

CRW 201-011: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, MURPHY O
This course will introduce students to the principles of creative writing and its three main genres: poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction. For each genre, we will learn fundamental craft elements, read and discuss a selection of contemporary pieces, and participate in in-class writing activities. Coursework will include creative work in each genre to be workshopped by the class, as well as at-home reading, short writing exercises, and critique of peers’ work. The class will culminate in the production of a final portfolio, showcasing the students’ best and most developed work of the semester. Text: Show & Tell 6th ed.

CRW 201-012: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, SPEIGEL R
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed. (Any additional texts for the course will be provided.)
This course is designed to give students an overview of each of the three genres of creative writing: poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction. Students will read published works in each genre, participate in discussions of assigned readings, and write their own creative pieces, which will periodically be workshopped in class. 
Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

 

CRW 201-013: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, SMITH E

 

CRW 201-014: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, HOBBS H
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-015: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, BARBER K
This course will introduce students to three creative writing genres: poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction. Students will read published works in each genre and be expected to discuss assigned readings. Each student will submit an original work for each genre to be workshopped by the class. Coursework will include weekly readings and responses, creative exercises, quizzes, workshop pieces, critiques of peers' work, and a final portfolio.


CRW 203-001: EVOLUTION OF CREATIVE WRITING, WILLIS D

 

CRW 203-002: EVOLUTION OF CREATIVE WRITING, SHEN C
Introduction to the historical development of poetic, narrative, and other forms of creative writing. Analytical and creative assignments develop student understanding of techniques such as metrics, point of view, and narrative structure. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives. Satisfies University Studies VI: Common Requirements/Critical Reasoning. This course is a core requirement for the CRW major and CRW minor.

CRW 203-003: EVOLUTION OF CREATIVE WRITING, BACON M
Introduction to the historical development of poetic, narrative, and other forms of creative writing. Analytical and creative assignments develop student understanding of techniques such as metrics, point of view, and narrative structure. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives. Satisfies University Studies VI: Common Requirements/Critical Reasoning. This course is a core requirement for the CRW major and CRW minor.

CRW 204-002: RESEARCH FOR CREATIVE WRITERS, RAMOS M
Do you ever get tired of writing about yourself? Have you ever wanted to write about something you didn’t know about? Do you wonder where and how to start researching, and once you’ve started, how to stop?  And once you’ve done your research, what do you do with it? In this class, we will look at how to research a new subject, stay focused when researching, decide what research is useful, and how to use your research to write compelling, creative work.

CRW 207-001: FICTION WRITING I, HOWARD A
Text: none
In this course, we will traverse how to write short stories of literary merit. We will illustrate the fundamentals of fiction writing and its many nuances: narration, scene, character, voice, style, tone, etc. Students will submit two short story manuscripts to be workshopped in the course. Much of the required work will focus on reading and reviewing one another’s fiction for workshop––providing careful line editing and letters of critique. The class will be supplemented by works of contemporary fiction, writing exercises, and discussions on craft. Together, we will become stronger readers, writers, and critics of short fiction.

CRW 207-002: FICTION WRITING I, BACON M
What effect do choices of form have on my story? Why should I choose one point of view (POV) above another? How can I write convincing, active dialogue? How can developed scenes make my work more immersive? How can I harness the power to surprise my reader and myself? What are the qualities of an effective opening, and an ending that delivers? How do I make my characters come alive on the page? Does realist fiction really exist, and how do the requirements of writing speculative, surreal, absurdist and genre traditions differ from it?

CRW 208-001: POETRY WRITING I, HOBBS H
This course, in part, will be a survey of the past hundred years in American poetry. We will begin in the early twentieth century, work our way up to today, and try to understand the changes we see along the way.
There will be a significant workshop component in this course, for which students will produce and critique each other’s original work. In addition, students will be expected to keep a writing journal, which will be turned in periodically throughout the semester, and memorize and recite at least one poem. The course will culminate in a final portfolio, in which students will present and analyze the body of work they have produced over the course of the semester.

 

CRW 208-002: POETRY WRITING I, SMITH E

 

CRW 209-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION I, SHEN C
Texts: Tell it Slant, 2nd ed., edited by Brenda Miller and Susanne Antonetta, and Touchstone Anthology of Creative Nonfiction, edited by Lex Williford and Michael Maratone
What does it mean to “Tell all the truth but tell it slant,” as poet Emily Dickinson once said? In this course, we will be exploring what it means to write one’s truth in a world that tells us that it is no longer important, to enrapture our readers with our magic and light. Creative nonfiction is a genre that combines the lyricism of poetry, the elements of fiction, and the truth of one’s experiences into one. Throughout this course, you will be reading a selection of different essays, narrative journalism pieces, biography, and more. You will also be writing your own pieces and participating in workshops, where you will give and receive thoughtful commentary on everyone’s original work.


CRW 209-002: CREATIVE NONFICTION I, WILLIS D

 

CRW 302-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION—READING FOR CRAFT, GERARD P
Students will read a range of creative nonfiction in long and short forms, focusing on the narrative strategies of each piece: practical and artistic decisions about structure, narrative stance, scene building, beginnings and endings, diction, and style. Each student will present an in-class analysis of one of the writers under discussion, examining key elements of craft that are expressed in composition. Other assignments will include short, directed original writings that use some of the narrative strategies above.

CRW 306-001: FORMS OF FICTION—READING FOR CRAFT, DE GRAMONT M
In this class, we will read novels and short stories with an eye toward applying what we learn toward our own work. This is primarily a reading and discussion class, and as such attendance is crucial. In addition to critical responses, students will write creatively in response to the reading.  Students will turn in a final revised exercise and a longer essay at the end of the class.

CRW 307-001: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, VOICE AND VISION, BRENNER W
The best writing feels urgent, authentic, and sincerely emotional, universal yet specific, unwieldy yet exactingly precise. In this class students will work on developing their skills in many different areas of narrative craft, with the goal of creating really great, truly original fiction. This is a workshop course, meaning the primary text and focus of our discussions is student writing. Students will write two or three finished pieces of fiction (15-20 pages grand total) and occasional short creative exercises, meeting regular deadlines. We will also read a selection of recently published short fiction by a range of authors. Attendance and active participation in discussion are mandatory.

CRW 308-001: INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING, MOTT J
In this class we will explore both contemporary and classic voices in poetry in addition to exploring various styles of the poetic form ranging from sonnets to spoken word and everything between. I’ll assign exercises based on the readings, some of which will result in complete poems for workshop. Grade will be based on a final portfolio of six finished poems, to be submitted at the end of class, and on participation, including exercises and journal assignments.

CRW 309-001: INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING, FURIA P
Prerequisite: CRW 209. Techniques of writing creative nonfiction and development of the creative process, including writing exercises, editing, and workshop discussion.

CRW 318-001: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, MONAHAN D
(FST 318) Prerequisite or co-requisite: FST 201; or prerequisite: PCRW, CRW and CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209; or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenwriting with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 318-002: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, BARROW J
(FST 318) Prerequisite or corequisite: FST 201; or prerequisite: PCRW, CRW and CRW 207 , CRW 208  or CRW 209 ; or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenwriting an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 318-003: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, LINEHAN T
(FST 318) Prerequisite or co-requisite: FST 201; or prerequisite: PCRW, CRW and CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209; or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenwriting with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 322-001 & -002: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T
Required texts: The New Well-Tempered Sentence, by Karen Elizabeth Gordon, and Polishing Your Prose, by Steven M. and Victor L. Cahn. [Recommended but not required: On Writing Well, by William Zinsser.] CRW and PCRW majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209. This course will focus on student strategies for editing their own creative writing for precision and clarity. It is not a traditional copyediting course. We will emphasize developing and applying skills in self-editing for grammar, mechanics, spelling, manuscript formatting, style, and other fundamentals crucial to effective, polished writing in the creative writing profession. Students will complete exercises and write/edit work using a series of prompts and assignments. Several exams and homework assignments will make up the grade. An attendance policy will be enforced. [Note: This course is required for the BFA degree and the Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-001: BOOKBUILDING, OLOIZIA J
This course offers hands-on training in the basics of effective graphic design and typography for book publishing. Students will become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite—InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator—while completing a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work. The course also incorporates a survey history of publishing, with a focus on current trends and the future of the book. Students should be prepared for a rigorous, fast-paced course that requires lab work outside of class hours. [Note: Bookbuilding counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 324-001: SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLISHING, DASGUPTA S
ISSUES OF DIVERSITY IN PUBLISHING
Increasingly, the lack of diversity in publishing has come under scrutiny and discussion. The steps taken to remedy the situation have included embracing social media and technology; an increase in collaborations among allies, professionals, and writers; the active pursuit of stories from marginalized and underrepresented communities; and the creation of safe, visible, and accessible spaces for them in conferences and seminars. The focus of this course will be to understand and analyze the publishing industry through the lens of diversity, the challenges publishers and editors face as they work toward creating a more inclusive book culture, and finding strategies that can meaningfully make a difference. Discussions, research, and readings will focus on topics including race, gender, orientation, class, and disability. Students will be expected to engage with and respond to writing from a variety of sources and perspectives, both online and in print. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 325-001: LITERARY MAGAZINE: Chautauqua, GERARD J
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 418-001: SCREENWRITING II: FEATURE FILM, HACKLER C
(FST 418) Prerequisites: FST 318 (CRW 318) or consent of instructor. The craft of screenwriting applied to the feature form. Students plan a feature-length screenplay, and write, workshop, and complete the first act.

CRW 420-001: ADVANCED WORKSHOP: GHOSTING, LEE R
This course will study ghosts as they appear in poetry, screenplays, plays, fiction and non-fiction.  Texts include: The Writing Life, by Stephen King, Misery, by Stephen King, The Haunting of Hill House, by Shirley Jackson, Beloved by Toni Morrison and many others.  In class discussions we will think about ghosts, but also loss, grief and death, studying how different writers struggle with the ineffable in their work.Students will be asked to write many in-class exercises, and one longer piece of fiction or non-fiction with a ghost, or a ghost-equivalent, in it.

 

CRW 420-002: ADVANCED MANUSCRIPT WORKSHOP—WRITING ABOUT FOOD, HEMINGWAY K

 

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, RAMOS M
Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program in order to receive permission to enroll in the Publishing Practicum. Prerequisites: CRW 321, 322, 323 Up to five interns support the work of The Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, producing, and promoting the senior BFA anthology in conjunction with CRW 496, the senior seminar. Practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 2-hour meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 and 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student's convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 460-002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH E
[Prerequisites: Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program and must have completed both CRW 323 and 460-001. Permission of instructor is required.]
Want to gain experience working for an independent press? A select group of undergraduate students helps with the daily work of the department's literary imprint, Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions as an internship and provides hands-on experience in our daily operations. Interns assist with the writing of press releases and other promotional materials; research sales and marketing leads; mail review copies and press kits; update our database of review outlets and bookstores; design, produce, and mail promotional materials; assist with maintenance of our website and social media outlets; and attend weekly staff meetings. Lookout practicum students work 8 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 3-hour meeting), under faculty supervision. Participants are selected by permission of instructor on the basis of excellent performance in previous publishing courses and demonstrated interest in the field. What students get out of the course-in advancement of their own understanding of the publishing enterprise, or in marketable skills to take with them-will be directly proportionate to their leadership, teamwork, and dedication. A brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

 

CRW 496-001: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, LEE R

 

CRW 496-002: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, WHITE M
In this multi-genre capstone seminar, you’ll distill, re-imagine, and polish your BFA thesis in workshop and revision sessions. We’ll work on getting submissions ready for the class anthology, give a public reading, and prepare for life beyond the undergraduate experience. We’ll discuss publication in general, have a visit from UNCW Career Services, and there will also be ample one-on-one conference time with your instructor as we look back on what you’ve done here, and ahead to your future.

 

 BFA Course Descriptions Archive