Creative Writing

BFA Course Descriptions

  • Note: for day & time information, please go to SeaNet and search for courses.
  • Visit catalogue.uncw.edu for catalogue course descriptions (choose current catalogue year from drop-down, then see link in left column for course descriptions).

 

Spring 2021

CRW 201-001: INTRO TO CREATIVE WRITING, LOWE E
This class will explore three genres in creative writing: poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Students will read texts within each genre, write their own poetry and prose from prompts, and workshop each other's work. This class will meet F2F once, for the first class meeting to get to know each other, and will then transition to Zoom and asynchronous learning.

CRW 201-800—808: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, BRENNER W
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.
Sections -800—808 On both Tuesdays and Thursdays, this course will meet synchronously at its regular meeting time via Zoom. Zoom link will be emailed to all students in advance of each class meeting. Attendance is considered mandatory. Students should email Professor Wendy Brenner with any questions.

CRW 201-809: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, RAM J
In this course students will receive an introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students will study craft through assigned essays and lecture, read published works in all three genres, and produce work for each genre. The class is centered around critical discussions of creative writing and workshopping one another's writing. No course text required. 
Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.


CRW 201-810: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, ELOFSON J


CRW 201-811: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, BECKNER S

This course is an introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. This is a writing workshop model course that also includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.
Section -811 will be held Online/OLSYN Spring 2021. Tuesdays/Thursdays from 11:00-12:15 with Graduate Teaching Assistant instructor Steph Cash-Beckner. Students should check their own schedules for their section number.

CRW 201-812: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, COLBERT M
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing in each of three genres: poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Students will learn fundamental craft elements, read published work, and write in each genre. Workshop is a key component of this course. 

CRW 201-813: INTRO TO CREATIVE WRITING, SCHWARTZ E
This course is designed to give students an overview of each of the three genres of creative writing: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction. The class will be discussion based, although students will also produce short written examples of work in each genre and longer pieces to be workshopped by their peers.

CRW 203-800: EVOLUTION OF CREATIVE WRITING, BRIDGES H
This course explores the ways in which creative writing has changed over time and how past works form future creative choices. Students will read books from a wide range of authors and eras and participate in nuanced discussion about the works and their impact.

CRW 203-801: EVOLUTION OF CREATIVE WRITING, MEYER A
In this course, we will study several works of writing from throughout history and the 20th century as a means of understanding the historical development and movements of creative writing. We will engage in critical analysis of written texts, and then we will apply those rhetorical moves to our own writing through creative assignments. This course makes a particular effort to de-colonialize and de-Westernize the literary canon, and includes readings from writers of diverse identities and backgrounds. Partially Satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives — Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 203-802: EVOLUTION OF CREATIVE WRITING, LANGSTON E
In this course we will consider how creative writing evolved as a means of resistance throughout the 20th century. From a historical, literary, and creative perspective we will interrogate texts that challenge traditionally elevated narratives, explore cultural paradoxes, and ask: what can writing do in form, cause, and culture? How have writers evolved to make sense of, engage with, and define their place in a chaotic and sometimes hostile world through their work? This is a reading and writing intensive course. You should be prepared to engage in weekly discussion threads, respond to creative prompts, and closely read anywhere from 30-80 pages per week. 

CRW 203-803: EVOLUTION OF CREATIVE WRITING, MCDERMOTT P
This course interrogates the ways in which creative writing has changed over time, and the ways in which past writing informs the work we engage with today.    Students will read books, stories, poems, and essays from a wide range of authors and eras. Through nuanced discussion and written assignments, they will investigate what the ongoing evolution of craft, theme, and genre means for them — both as readers and as writers. 

CRW 204-800 RESEARCH FOR CREATIVE WRITERS, GERARD P
(3 credit hours)
MW 2-3:15 PM
Research is a creative process. The goal of the class is to instill the habits of alertness, resourcefulness, and ingenuity as indispensable to the research process. Curiosity, a strong work ethic, and a hunger for exactness will be equally important. By the end of the semester, each student should also have a “toolbox” of practical methods and techniques to employ in the service of creative projects in any genre. We’ll approach the art and craft of research as part treasure hunt, part detective story, and part investigative reporting.
This will be a field course, meaning that one of its goals is to get students out of the classroom and into the “field”—whatever field is relevant to their project (During COVID this “field” is likely to be mostly virtual).

CRW 207-800: FICTION WRITING I, SCHWARTZ E
Students in this course will do various in-class and out-of-class writing assignments, discuss various readings, and participate in traditional workshops. The course objective is to give students the skills they need to write effective fiction and to think critically as well as creatively.

CRW 207-801: FICTION WRITING I, DICKERSON P
Instruction in writing fiction, including critical evaluation by instructor and class of students' original works. Students also critique and relate to their own work the fiction of relevant professional authors.

CRW 208-800: POETRY WRITING I, BRIDGES H
This course dives into poetry: different forms, revision techniques, and ways to write it. The poetry we explore will vary in style, technique, and origin. This course also captures the different ways in which poets can function as a community. The semester consists of several workshops, during which each student will submit a draft they’ve been working on and respond to each other’s pieces. This course will culminate with a final portfolio of work.

CRW 208-801: POETRY WRITING I, MEYER A
This is a course for students who have an interest in reading, writing, and critiquing poetry. We will read poetry spanning from the turn of the 20th century to the present with attention to form and content, and we will engage in craft discussions, writing exercises, and significant workshopping and revision of our own poetry. This course will embody traditional connotations of the “workshop” as an industrious, experimental, messy place where everyone is engaged in the creative process and where they can find community, resources, and knowledge. Assessment will be based on participation, attendance, completion of writing exercises and workshop assignments, and a final portfolio of revised poems. No course text required.

CRW 209-800: CREATIVE NONFICTION 1, LANGSTON E
Workshop-based instruction in writing creative nonfiction. Students should be prepared to share original writings with their peers and offer close readings and thoughtful feedback on one another's work. Students also critique and relate their own work to the work of relevant professional authors. 

CRW 209-801: CREATIVE NONFICTION 1, MCDERMOTT P
Students will explore the world of creative nonfiction and its subgenres, including but not limited to: short memoir, the personal essay, and personal cultural criticism. This is a participation-heavy class in which students are required to submit two pieces of original creative nonfiction to be discussed in workshop with their peers. They will also complete writing exercises and respond to multiple pieces of published creative nonfiction per week.

CRW 302-800: THE EMPOWERING ELEMENTS OF THE PERSONAL ESSAY: READING FOR FORM AND PHILOSOPHY, LOCKHART Z 
In this course, we will explore the personal essay as a form and explore how this form lends itself to three tenants of Black feminist theory which seek to help marginalized people self-define, heal, and create community. We will look at the ways the form calls the reader to bear witness to an impactful life event for each author and follows that event through to revelation and outcome. These plot elements draw readers in through unique human experiences that connect us all at the root of our humanity. We will ponder form-questions like, how does a personal essay lend itself to the form of a full-length memoir, and what are the microcosmic elements of plot that are explored in this short form? We will explore philosophical questions like, how does this form offer the marginalized voice a tool for connecting their unique experiences to the shared humanity of all readers?  Essayists will include contemporary writers like Kiese Laymon and John Paul Brammer, and long-established voices like Alice Walker and Veronica Chambers. Students will write one paper where they analyze, critique, compare and connect with two of the essays read during class. Students will also learn about this literary form from the experience of writing a personal essay which we will create during class sessions.  

CRW 306-001: FICTION: READING FOR CRAFT, DE GRAMONT M 
In this class, we will read short stories with an eye toward applying what we learn toward our own work. This is primarily a reading and discussion class, and as such attendance is crucial. In addition to critical responses, students will write creatively in response to the reading.  Students will turn in a final revised exercise and a longer essay at the end of the class. 

CRW 307-800: FICTION II, LEE, R
The first month of this semester will consist of writing exercises that attempt to isolate and develop various aspects of story-telling—setting, language, idea, character and narrative momentum.
The last two-thirds of the course we will be workshopping stories. 

CRW 307-801: FICTION WRITING II, SIEGEL R 
Students will produce original fiction; critique the work of fellow students; and read and discuss published stories. Emphasis will be on building an awareness of language and story structure, and on exploring the nature of scene. Online, synchronous.

CRW 308-800: POETRY WRITING II, STID S  
In this intermediate workshop-based course, students will deepen their commitment to the craft of poetry. Together, we will embark on an exploration of the writing life, learning to approach the writing of poems as both process and practice. We will create a community of writers, making a generous and generative space in which to develop as poets, readers, and learners. Course expectations include regularly turning in poems for workshop; engaging deeply and thoughtfully with the poems of classmates in workshop; and reading and discussing books of contemporary poetry and interviews with poets, as well as essays on craft and form. As we read, write, and discuss poems, we will further build a critical vocabulary that will help in developing your own work and connecting to the work of others. You will end the course better able to understand and articulate your own poetics—how you write, and why. The final project will be a portfolio of polished poems that we’ll approach as the beginnings of a chapbook manuscript.  

CRW 309-800: CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING II, MOEZZI M
In this course, students will read, write, discuss and critique a wide array of creative nonfiction (CNF). The class will include assigned readings, short writing assignments, and a final project. The aim of the course is to improve students' writing through critical reading, discussion, writing, and revision. By the end of this semester, students should have a better grasp of CNF in general, as well as a respectable portfolio of their own CNF writing.

CRW 321-800, -801: INTRO TO BOOK PUBLISHING, ELLIS FLEMING, K
An introduction to the culture and commerce of books, this course examines the life cycle of a book; the people and processes involved in book publishing; and the history, business, economics, and ethics of the publishing industry. The class will be broken into formal lectures, given by the professor and invited industry professionals, each Tuesday morning, and smaller, discussion-based sections on Thursdays. Readings, research assignments, and a book auction will help students discover how publishing decisions are made. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.

 

CRW 322-800, -801: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T

 

CRW 323-001: BOOKBUILDING, MANNES MURRAY C
This course offers hands-on training in the basics of effective graphic design and typography for book publishing. Students will become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite—InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator—while completing a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work. The course also incorporates a survey history of publishing, with a focus on current trends and the future of the book. Students should be prepared for a rigorous, fast-paced course that requires lab work outside of class hours. [Note: Bookbuilding counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 324-001: SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLISHING: ISSUES OF DIVERSITY, DASGUPTA S
Increasingly, the lack of diversity in publishing has come under scrutiny and discussion. Remedial steps have included creating campaigns via social media; increasing collaborations among allies, professionals, and writers; active pursuit of stories from marginalized and underrepresented communities; and the creation of safe, visible, and accessible spaces for all in conferences and seminars. The focus of this course will be to understand and analyze the publishing industry through the lens of diversity, the challenges publishers and editors face as they work toward creating a more inclusive book culture, and finding strategies that can meaningfully make a difference. Students will be expected to engage with and respond to a variety of sources and perspectives, both online and in print, while learning about the many voices of concern and dissent amongst writers, readers, and publishers; and how issues of diversity affect readers, writers, and the wider culture.

CRW 325-800: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL PRACTICUM, GERARD P
(3 credit hours) 
W 3:30-6:15 PM
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work.

CRW 420-800: ADVANCED POETRY WORKSHOP, WHITE M
This class will focus on groundbreaking collections of poetry. We’ll read Ariel, by Sylvia Plath; Wicked Enchantment, by Wanda Coleman; Fantasia for the Man In Blue, by Tommye Blount; Guillotine, by Eduardo C. Corral; and Postcolonial Love Poem, by Natalie Diaz. Since these are Zoom classes, you’ll have the choice of reading either print or digital editions. You’ll keep a reading journal; give presentations to the class; and, most importantly, write and workshop in response to prompts throughout the semester. You’ll have regular conferences with me. Toward the end of the semester, you’ll assemble and workshop a portfolio of revised poems. Grade will be based 50% on participation, including attendance, critiques, and other contributions to workshop.

CRW 420-801: WRITING FOR THE PUBLIC GOOD, EDGERTON C
Students will be asked to write opinion editorials (op-eds), letters to the editor, as well as speeches to be presented to public bodies. Students will select topics they are interested in and will seek publication. There will be workshopping and discussion in small groups. Emphasis will be on clarity, conciseness, and accuracy of written and spoken material. Guest speakers will be chosen by the professor and/or students. The professor will use individualized instruction by phone and Zoom in order to counteract the absence of face-to-face instruction.

CRW 425-800: THE DEBUT BOOK, ELLIS FLEMING, K
What is it that makes certain debut books so noteworthy? What sets certain authors and stories apart, entitling them to a wide readership? Do they have superior artistry and vision? Better craft and technique? Or does it all come down to having a great publisher and a killer marketing plan? And what roles do industry diversity and inclusivity (or the lack thereof) play in whether a book makes a splash?
In this advanced special topics course, you'll study debut works of fiction and nonfiction from a diverse roster of acclaimed authors, not only examining their prose styles, their chosen subject matter, and the ways they employ narrative voice but also considering specific questions relevant to each author’s body of work and how these relate to the critical reception of their first published book. You will become familiar with current literary trends and develop the skills to assess contemporary works of literature with the mind of a reader, writer, and editor, and relate those analyses to the professional context of publishing, e.g. author-agent and author-editor relationships, the book deal, marketing and publicity, and inherent industry biases, etc.

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT BOOKS, SMITH EMILY
[Prerequisites: Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program and must have completed CRW 321, 322, and 323. To apply to the Lookout practicum, please reach out to the instructor by email in advance of registration. A brief interview is required.] Want to gain experience working for an independent publishing house? A select group of undergraduate students works alongside the graduate-student team to support the daily work of the department's award-winning literary imprint, Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). This practical course functions as an internship and provides hands-on experience in our daily operations. Interns research marketing and publicity leads; ship review copies and press kits; design, produce, and mail books and promotional materials; and assist with the maintenance of our website and social media. Lookout practicum students work 8 hours weekly--from home or in the Publishing Lab as needed (including a 2-hour Zoom meeting)--under faculty supervision. Participants are selected by permission of instructor on the basis of excellent performance in previous publishing courses and demonstrated interest in the field. What students get out of the course--in advancement of their own understanding of the publishing enterprise, or in marketable skills to take with them--will be directly proportionate to their leadership, teamwork, and dedication. May be repeated once for credit. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 460-002, -003: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, RAMOS M
Students must have been admitted to the certificate program in order to receive permission to enroll in the publishing practicum. Prerequisite: CRW 321, 322, 323.
A select group of students support the work of the Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, and producing books and other publications. Undergraduate practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 1.5 hour staff meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 or 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student’s convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit.

CRW 496-800: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, CROWE M
In this capstone course, creative writing majors will compile, polish, and submit their BFA theses, collaborate with our department’s Publishing Lab to create an anthology of BFA student writing, and give a public reading of their own work. In addition to these major projects, we’ll demystify professional and practical aspects of the writing life, including submitting creative work for publication, pursuing graduate studies, and developing sustainable and sustaining writerly practices.

CRW 496-801: SENIOR SEMINAR IN POETRY, MÖRLING, M
In this class, we will address both creative and practical questions pertaining to the vocation of the poet. We will prepare a thesis manuscript including a critical preface, familiarize ourselves with the world of literary magazines and submit poems for publication, discuss careers in publishing, and the pros and cons of applying to an MFA program and other matters. We will also collaborate and develop together with students in The Publishing Laboratory, a class poetry anthology. At the end of the semester all students will give a public reading of their own work.

 

 

 BFA Course Descriptions Archive