Department of History

Glen Harris, Associate Professor

GlenHarris

Degrees

  • Ph.D., Florida State University (2003)

Academic Interests

Glen Anthony Harris received his Ph.D. from Florida State University in 2003. He has taught at North Carolina Central University, North Carolina A&T State University, and Florida A&M University before joining UNCW's history department in 2002.

He is the author of The Ocean Hill-Brownsville Conflict: Intellectual Struggles between Blacks and Jews at Mid-Century, (Lexington Books, 2012) which examines the role that certain black and Jewish writers and intellectuals played in the characterization of black-Jewish relations in relations from 1900 to the 1968 Ocean Hill-Brownsville school conflict.

In addition, his most recent publications are:

“The Crisis of Harold Cruse and Adolph Reed: A Perspective on the American Letter’s Tradition,” Journal of Liberal Arts and Humanities, Volume 1, No. 1: 99-110 (January 2020).

“How does it Feel to be a Problem: Reflections on the Trayvon Martin Case and the American Idea,” in The Trayvon Martin in US: An American Tragedy. Emmanuel Harris II and Antonio Tillis, Eds. Peter Lang Publishing. (Spring 2015).

He is currently working on two projects. First:

A manuscript-length biography on Alexander McAllister Rivera, Jr.: Alexander McAllister Rivera, Jr.: The Art and Politics of a Black Photojournalist. Rivera was an incredibly active photojournalist who reported, in both words and pictures, on some of the monumental events of the 20th century (domestic and international).

Second:

An article length examination of Rivera's international trip to Accra, Ghana in 1957: “The Politics of Liberation: Alexander Rivera, the Pittsburgh Courier, and the African Independence Movement.”

Reintroducing Alex Rivera to the historical record, whose photojournalistic work on this period has been ignored or underappreciated by historians of the African American press and more generally by historians of the black past, provides African Americans a more nuance understanding of the African Independence Movement, of individual African countries, and on the meaning and evolution of the term African American.

Courses Taught

Significant Publications

  • The Ocean Hill-Brownsville Conflict: Intellectual Struggles between Blacks and Jews at Mid-Century, (Lexington Books, 2012)
  • "Ishmael Reed and the Postmodern Slave Narrative." Comparative American Studies: An International Journal Volume 5, Number 4: 459-479
  • "How does it Feel to be a Problem: Reflections on the Trayvon Martin Case and the American Idea," in The Trayvon Martin in US: An American Tragedy
  • The Crisis of Harold Cruse and Adolph Reed: A Perspective on the American Letter’s Tradition,” Journal of Liberal Arts and Humanities, Volume 1, No. 1: 99-110