Cultures, Critters, and Communities Curriculum Unit

Lesson 2: I am Part of My Community

North Carolina Essential Standards

K.C&G.1 Understand the roles of a citizen.

K.C.1 Understand how individuals are similar and different.

K.RL.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

K.W.2.Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.

K.SL.1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).

b. Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.

1.C.1 Understand the diversity of people in the local community.  

1.G.2 Understand how humans and the environment interact within the local community.

1.RL.1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

1.W.2.Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

1.SL.1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

b. Build on others’ talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges.

c. Ask questions to clear up any confusion

2.C&G.2 Understand the roles and responsibilities of citizens.

2. RL.1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

2.W.2.Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

2.SL.1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

b. Build on others’ talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others.

c. Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion.

 

Prerequisite Knowledge

Students will base today’s lesson on previous instruction about diversity in where we live and the understanding that where we live is only a small part of the world. Students learned that physical geography impacts how people live and we will discover how that applies to their communities.

Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • understand and discuss key details from a text.
  • understand and acknowledge diversity and similarities in classmates.
  • work together in small groups to complete a poster depicting how they can take part in their community and/or on a global basis.
  • present their project to the class with each student participating in the presentation.


Assessments

  • Students will be informally assessed through observation while working in small groups and creating and presenting their posters.

    Informal Assessment: Look Where We Live Graphic Organizer

    Formative Assessment: Student Posters

    • Students’ posters should include a title, a picture as the main body, captions, and student names.

    • All students should participate in creating the poster.

    • All students should participate in presenting the poster.

Materials

Children's Books:

Look Where We Live: A First Book of Community Building. Written by Scot Ritchie. A free online copy is available through Epic! Books (https://www.getepic.com/app/) and can be projected onto a whiteboard.

Other:

Look Where We Live Graphic Organizer (1 per student)

Poster Board. (Use ½ sheet of poster board per small group)

Crayons/Markers (5 or 6 per group)

Presentation Thought Sheet  (1 per student)

 

Prior Preparation

  • If students are not familiar with creating a poster, prepare a poster of the book Look Where We Live: A First Book of Community Building as a model of what is needed on a poster: a heading, colored picture, a few simple phrases, and student names. Create a second poster to model one of the points from the graphic organizer. See Teacher Aids for examples.

Introduction

  1. Ask student to explain where they live.This is a review of a previous lesson.  Students should give grade appropriate answers. Help student appreciate the importance similarities and diversity of living in different locations. Review other locations around the world to encourage a global aspect.
  2. Brainstorm with students what it means to be a part of a local and global community. What can they do to be a part of this? Would this change if they lives in a different country? How? Why?  

Guided Practice

  1. Read aloud the book Look Where We Live: A First Book of Community Building.  
  2. Following the read-aloud, ask students to explain the purpose of the book, the importance of diversity, and the responsibilities of all citizens.
  3. Give each student a Look Where We Live graphic organizer. Return to the beginning of the book.  Ask students the main idea of each page; have students fill in a section of the graphic organizer for each page.
  4. Explain that students will go into small groups to create a poster depicting one of the citizenship ideas from their graphic organizer.  If making posters is a new idea to them, show them the poster about the book and teach the important parts of a poster.
  5. Show students the teacher generated poster modeling one of the points from the graphic organizer.  (See example: “I Can Clean My Community.”) Point out the required parts of the poster; title, picture, captions, and student names.
  6. Give each student a Presentation Thought sheet. Explain that early finishers may return to their seats and fill out this out as a way to organize their presentation ideas.  Allow students a moment to think about this, and possibly write some ideas.
  7. Send groups to work spaces with poster board, graphic organizers, and writing supplies.
  8. As students work, rotate throughout the room, ensuring all students are participating.  Give positive feedback on groups that are sharing responsibilities. Keep students focused on their topic.by asking “What is your main idea?” and “What is the title of your poster?”  Ask students if they are integrating diversity or global ideas. Is their poster depicting an idea where they live or in another country?
  9. To ensure accountability, ask students what they are doing to help and what is being worked on with the poster at this moment. Some students might appear to be not working, but they might just be waiting their turn.
  10. Early finishers may return to their seats and fill out the Presentation Thought Sheet.

Closure

  1. Have groups present their posters at the front of the room.  Review presentation procedures: how to hold the poster board for all to see, speaking loud enough for all to hear, and only one person speaking at a time.
  2. Encourage members of each group to explain the title, picture, and any specific captions or details. If a student has not participated, ask what their favorite part was, or how they helped create the poster.    

Enrichment

  1. Students can be offered a chance to write a letter to their families explaining ways they would like to support their community, both locally and globally. This will offer each student an opportunity to reflect on the ideas presented and personal ways to implement these ideas.
  2. Family members could be invited into the classroom to share cultural experiences and how they were a part of their global community.