Virginia Holman's Spring 2013
CRW 320: Adventure Writing!

Returning Spring 2014!

BFA Course Descriptions Archive

 

Spring 2014


CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 203-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, DOTSEY J
Texts: The Round House by Louise Erdrich; Antigone by Sophocles; Pulphead by John Jeremiah Sullivan; poetry TBD.
How do characters within a novel differ from those written for the stage? What can poets do that nonfiction writers can’t? In this reading-intensive course we will study poetry, fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction to understand the choices and limitations inherent within each genre. This class will require in-class discussion as well as analytical and creative writing. This is not a workshop class, however, so students should be prepared to read closely with an eye toward understanding form more than anything else. There will be a final exam.

CRW 203-002: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, HENNESSEY C
Writers often explore dystopias as a way to raise real-world issues regarding society, environment, politics, religion, psychology, spirituality, or technology. In this class, we will study the major forms of creative writing – poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction – by writers who explore the ways in which society can, will, or might fracture. Readings will include works by T.S. Eliot, Sophocles, Kurt Vonnegut, Margaret Atwood, John Jeremiah Sullivan, and Jo Ann Beard. This is a discussion-based class with both creative and analytical written assignments, as well as a final examination over all the reading in the course.

CRW 203-003: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, SKLAR E
Texts: A Visit From The Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, Bring The Noise: The Best Pop Culture Essays from Barrelhouse Magazine, poetry TBD
How do characters within a novel differ from those written for the stage? What can poets do that nonfiction writers can’t? In this reading-intensive course we will study poetry, fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction to understand the choices and limitations inherent within each genre. This class will require in-class discussion as well as analytical and creative writing. This is not a workshop class, so students should be prepared to read closely with an eye toward understanding form more than producing their own creative work. There will be a final exam.

CRW 203-004: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, MORRIS J
Texts: Fiction: A Visit From the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan; Creative Nonfiction: Another Bullshit Night In Suck City by Nick Flynn; Drama: ‘Art’ by Yasmina Reza and translated by Christopher Hampton; Poetry: Tell Me by Kim Addonizio. In this class, you will study short stories, novels, essays, poems, and plays to deepen your understanding of the writer’s craft and technique. You will learn to read as a writer, attending to aspects of form such as image in poetry, plot in drama, point of view in fiction, and narrative voice in creative nonfiction. You will learn to read literature in a new way, just as a student who has taken a course in film studies learns to view films in a new way—attending to camera angles, lighting, and editing. You will write essays analyzing the work, as well as several short creative assignments in each genre.

CRW 204-001 RESEARCH FOR CREATIVE WRITERS, GERARD P
Research is a creative process in its own right that not only helps authenticate a piece of writing but also can yield new possibilities for projects in all genres. We'll explore basic tools of research, including the art of the interview, locating and using print archives, travel-based fieldwork, electronic and digital resources, and other methods, in the context of examples of how other writers have met the challenges of research. Then we will apply these to original creative work in the student's chosen genre. Our focus will be both practical and aesthetic. Students should expect assignments that take them beyond the classroom to conduct their own original research toward a final project that incorporates that research-- in poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction.

CRW 207-001: FICTION WRITING, SIEGRIST T
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott.
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of short fiction by reading assigned texts and writing their own stories. Students turn in regular creative exercises, culminating in full-length short stories. Class participation and attendance are essential to ensure a quality workshop experience. Imagination is also required.

CRW 207-002: FICTION WRITING, HENNESSEY C
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott.
In this course, students will learn the essential elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work with the help of their peers. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively, enthusiastically, and thoughtfully, and regular attendance is a must.

CRW 207-003: FICTION WRITING, DOTSEY J
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Wiliford and Michael Martone); The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers by John Gardner.
In this course, students will learn the introductory elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively and thoughtfully; regular attendance is crucial.

CRW 208-001:INTRODUCTION TO POETRY WRITING,MORRIS J
Texts:The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry, J.D. McClatchy; The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry, Ilya Kaminsky, Susan Harris; Ordinary Genius, Kim Addonizio; Letters to a Young Poet, Rainer Maria Rilke, M.D. Herter Norton.
In this introductory course we will explore the craft of poetry. Emily Dickinson said,
“If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.” As a class, we will approach poetry as a group of writers and readers in search of the same feeling that Dickinson speaks of. Students will be required to complete assigned reading, in-class writing exercises, writing of their own poetry, a final portfolio, and active participation in classroom discussion.

CRW 208-002: POETRY WRITING, JONES L
Texts: The Penguin Anthology of Twenty-First Century American Poetry, edited by Rita Dove; Ordinary Genius, by Kim Addonizio; Letters to a Young Poet, by Rainer Maria Rilke, M.D. Herter Norton.
Anne Carson notes, “"Prose is a house, poetry a man in flames running quite fast through it.” In this intro to poetry class, we will focus on relating to poetry in an academic and creative context. Through focused reading, reading responses, in-class writing, and workshops, we will explore what it is to write poetry today. As this course is discussion-oriented, consistent attendance is required: come to class, bring your words.

CRW 209-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION, VAUGHAN C
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction Vol. 1 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What is the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Creative nonfiction writers put the truth into context in a way that is unique to them, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively to identify our own stories and to learn to tell them in a way that intrigues others. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 209-002: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE NONFICTION, SKLAR E
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction, Vol. 2 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What's the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Creative nonfiction writers share their personal truth in the context of fact, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism, and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively, learn to identify our own stories, and find engaging, unique ways to tell them. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 302-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, MESSER S
‘Just think what it would mean,’ Ferenczi wrote to Freud in 1910, ‘if one could tell everyone the truth...’” from Adam Phillips, Terrors and Experts
In 1998, concerning the popularity of memoir, Daphne Merkin wrote: "Ours is a culture addicted to exposure, to 'outing' ourselves and others." This course focuses on the history of narrative non-fiction, autobiography, the essay, the lyric essay, and memoir in America from pre-colonial era to the present.  We will explore ways in which the memoir genre has developed out of the personal essay, narrative broadsides, reportage and autobiography. William Zissner once described a memoir as “a window into a life…a portion of a larger autobiography.” Yet George Bernard Shaw wrote: "All autobiographies are lies … I do not mean unconscious, unintentional lies; I mean deliberate lies.”
Is it possible to write a truthful memoir or essay? Is it possible to report something exactly as it happened? How can we write about history? How has creative nonfiction developed and where is it headed? The course will examine different approaches to non-fiction over-time including early essays, slave and captivity narratives, and more non-traditional or experimental forms of memoir, narrative and objective reportage and the nonfiction novel – some conceptually and formally innovative. We will also look at controversy in the genre both past and present. The goal of the class is to give students a sense of the history (and possibilities) of ever-changing nonfiction writing.
Texts include: Lost Origins of the Essay (ed. John D’Agata); The Next American Essay, (ed. John D’Agata); Lifespan of a Fact, John D’Agata; Another Bullshit Night in Suck City, Nick Flynn; In Cold Blood, Truman Capote;  Pulphead, John Sullivan; Bluetes by Maggie Nelson; Things That Are by Amy Leach; Behind the Beautiful Forevers, Katherine Boo; Wild, Cheryl Strayed.

CRW 303-001: FORMS OF POETRY, MÖRLING M
In this class we will consider forms and how they fit and inform the philosophical perspective of our poems. What choices do we make in crafting our poems? What is our process of selection? Are poems, like the bowls of the ancient Japanese potters, born? Or are they made? Emily Dickinson wrote: “Nature is a haunted house. Art--/a house that tries to be haunted.” How can our poems be as natural as possible, the form and the content inevitable to the point of near invisibility? The global designer Bruce Mau has said: “For most of us, design is invisible. Until it fails.” Is this what the 18th century Japanese poet Ryokan meant when he wrote: “Who says my poems are poems?/My poems are not poems,/ After you know my poems are not poems,/ Then we can begin to discuss poetry.”

CRW 306-001: FORMS OF FICTION, BOYAJIAN M
This course will focus on the exploration of fictional elements (the creative possibilities) in the novel. While it is primarily a reading and discussion class (not a workshop) our goal is to read these novels like writers – to zero in on authorial choices in structure, characterization, scene, setting, dialogue, imagery, POV, etc. in an effort to further our own sensibilities and possibilities as writers.

CRW 307-001,-002: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, WATSON L
Restricted to CRW majors.
Donald Barthelme said, “The aim of literature ... is the creation of a strange object covered with fur which breaks your heart.” In this course we will break hearts with our writing. You will build on the fiction writing skills you’ve already learned, and in addition, you will learn to read like a writer. You will learn your strengths as writer, and via class discussion and the process of revision, you will learn how to improve your own writing, kill all your darlings, make your work  break hearts, etc. This is a workshop based course in which we will analyze and discuss up to three pieces of your own writing, as well as discuss short fiction that will be handed out in class.

CRW 308-001: INTERMEDIATE POETRY WORKSHOP, ADAMS L
Pre-requisite—CRW 208. This course is intended for poets who have acquired a basic knowledge of the craft and who now wish to hone their skills. The majority of class time will be spent workshopping student work, but we will also read and discuss two collections of contemporary poetry (Natasha Trethewey’s, Thrall and Gail Marin’s Begin Empty-Handed).  Requirements include formal responses to these collections, an analysis of four poems of your choice from the anthology The Best American Poetry 2013, and written responses to the work of peers. Final portfolio of workshopped poems, revised.

CRW 315-001: TRANSLATION, MÖRLING M
Octavio Paz said: “Translation is an art of analogy, the art of finding correspondences. An art of shadows and echoes…” Charles Baudelaire said that poetry is essentially analogy. The idea of universal correspondence comes from the idea that language is a micro cosmos, a double of the universe. Between the language of the universe and the universe of language, there is a bridge, a link: poetry. The poet, says Baudelaire, is the translator.”
In this class we will read and compare multiple translations of single poems and passages of prose in order to examine the choices and strategies of literary translation. In addition, each student in the class will also provide weekly contributions of his or her own translations. These translations will serve as focal points for the larger subject of translation, that of the writer as translator. Readings will include selections of translations from Swedish, German, French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Hebrew, Spanish and Portuguese. Knowledge of a second language is welcome but not at all necessary.

CRW 316-001: PLAYWRITING
(THR 316) Prerequisite: CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209 or consent of instructor. Analysis of one-act plays and their construction; the writing of an original one-act play required.

CRW 318-001,-002,-003: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING
(FST 318) Prerequisite or corequisite: FST 201; or prerequisite: PCRW, CRW and CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209; or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenwriting an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 320-001: THE ADVENTURE NARRATIVE, HOLMAN V
This course will take students far beyond the classroom. Our first adventure will be a weekend trip (two nights) to Lake Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge. In winter, the lake is home to over 100,000 waterbirds. We'll explore the area with the Refuge Director and his staff. Our second adventure will be a daytime trip on the Black River to view a pristine cypress swamp that is home to the oldest known living trees east of the Rockies. Students will have the opportunity to observe and explore, interview experts and locals, and take notes while in the field. Students will use the material gathered on these trips to craft two compelling nonfiction stories.
Students may expect to read articles and essays by Annie Dillard, Sebastien Junger, Mark Twain, John Branch, and others. We'll also read two book-length narratives: Into The Wild (Jon Krakauer) and Wild (Cheryl Strayed). In addition, several experts in coastal ecology and wildlife will meet with our class prior to our trips.
A spirit of adventure (and attendance on both trips) is mandatory. (Trip one departs the afternoon of Friday Jan 31 and returns Sunday Feb 2. Trip two departs the morning of 6 April and returns late that afternoon.)

CRW 322-001: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T
Required texts: The New Well-Tempered Sentence, by Karen Elizabeth Gordon, and Polishing Your Prose, by Steven M. and Victor L. Cahn. [Recommended but not required: On Writing Well, by William Zinsser.] CRW and PCRW majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209. This course will focus on editing students’ own creative writing for precision and clarity. We will emphasize developing and applying skills in self-editing for grammar, mechanics, spelling, manuscript formatting, style, and other fundamentals crucial to effective, polished writing in the creative writing profession. Students will complete exercises and write/edit work using a series of prompts and assignments. Exams and homework will make up the grade. Class participation is a must. An attendance policy will be enforced. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-001: BOOKBUILDING, JONES K
Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, 209, or consent of instructor. This course offers hands-on training in the basics of effective graphic design and typography for book publishing. Students will become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite—InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator—while completing a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work. The course also incorporates a survey history of publishing, with a focus on current trends and the future of the book. Students should be prepared for a rigorous, fast-paced course that requires lab work outside of class hours. [Note: Bookbuilding counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-002: BOOKBUILDING, STAPLES B
Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, 209, or consent of instructor. This course offers hands-on training in the basics of effective graphic design and typography for book publishing. Students will become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite—InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator—while completing a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work. The course also incorporates a survey history of publishing, with a focus on current trends and the future of the book. Students should be prepared for a rigorous, fast-paced course that requires lab work outside of class hours. [Note: Bookbuilding counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 324-001: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL, WILSON H
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions,work on a developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 407-001: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING, BOYAJIAN M
We will begin the semester by studying published fiction and discussing the elements of craft to identify the individual needs of every student in this class – all the way from interests/inspiration to the process of revising with publication as the final goal. We will read and brainstorm, write short pieces, experiment and explore, and we will hone our strengths and also zero in on the elements of fiction that just don’t make it onto the page as organically as we’d like – those hurdles we stumble over or avoid altogether that are actually opportunities lying in wait.

CRW 408-001: ADVANCED POETRY WRITING, COX M
A craft workshop.  Student poets critique and encourage each other's work, emphasizing extensive revision.  We'll focus on the structural aspects of lyric and narrative poetry. Journal consists of responses to extensive reading assignments in modern and contemporary poetry and poetics, as well as numerous process exercises.  Individualized reading lists and handouts on Blackboard.

CRW 419-001: SCREENWRITING III: FILM ADAPTATION
(FST 419) Prerequisite: FST 318 (CRW 318) or consent of instructor. Writing, revision, and completion of screen adaptation of literary work.

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, STAPLES B
Students must have been admitted to the certificate program in order to receive permission to enroll in the publishing practicum. Prerequisite: CRW 321, 322, 323
A select group of students support the work of The Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, and producing books and other publications. Undergraduate practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 1.5 hour staff meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 or 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student’s convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit.

CRW 460-002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT, SMITH E
[Prerequisites: Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program and must have completed both CRW 323 and 460-001. Permission of instructor is required.]
Want to gain experience working for a small press? A select group of undergraduate students help with the daily work of the department’s literary imprint, Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions as an internship and provides hands-on experience in our daily operations. Interns can expect to assist with the writing of press releases and other promotional materials; research sales and marketing leads; mail review copies, press releases, and other promotional materials; update our database of review outlets and bookstores; design, produce, and mail publicity kits; assist with maintenance of our Web site and social media outlets; and attend weekly staff meetings. Lookout practicum students work 8 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 2-hour meeting), under faculty supervision. Participants are selected by permission of instructor on the basis of excellent performance in previous publishing courses and demonstrated interest in the field. What students get out of the course—in advancement of their own understanding of the publishing enterprise, or in marketable skills to take with them—will be directly proportionate to their leadership, professionalism, and dedication. A brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 496-001: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, HOLMAN V
The Senior Seminar is the capstone course in our BFA program. We have several goals: selection and preparation of your thesis material, creation of your critical preface, and collaboration with the Publishing Laboratory students to create an anthology of student prose. We will also organize your public reading at the end of the semester. In addition, we'll discuss topics such graduate school, publication, and employment. Students should enter the class with a three to five page selection of prose suitable for the anthology.

CRW 496-002: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, BASS T
CRW majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 407, 408, or 409. 6 credit hours. This course, reserved for students in their final semester in the major, is the capstone learning experience for creative writing majors. The seminar will address issues of the profession in preparation for and beyond graduation. Each student will compile, polish, and submit a BFA thesis and give a public reading.The course also will include discussions of professional topics, such as publishing creative work, seeking employment after graduation, and applying to graduate school. Requirements include completing the senior thesis with a substantial critical preface, participating in the senior anthology in conjunction with The Publishing Laboratory, and giving a public reading of the student’s original creative work. [Note: The course is part of University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive.]

CRW 496-003: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, DE GRAMONT N
In this course students will compile, perfect, and submit their BFA theses, collaborate with other writers and our department’s Publishing Lab to create an anthology of BFA student work, and give a public reading of their own fiction. The class will also include discussion of professional issues such as submitting creative work for publication, careers in writing and publishing, and applying to graduate school.

CRW 498: UNDERGRADUATE INTERNSHIP IN CREATIVE WRITING
(1-6 hours of credit) Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 201, and nine additional hours of CRW writing courses, of which at least three are at the 300-400 level. Academic training and practical writing experience through work in a private company or public agency. Faculty supervision and evaluation of all study and on-site activity. Open to students of junior or senior standing in all majors who have been approved by the faculty internship advisor.

 

 

Fall 2013

CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

CRW 201-016: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, MORRIS J
Text: Show & Tell, 6th ed.; Letters to a Young Poet, Rainer Maria Rilke, M.D. Herter
Norton.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction—a retreat for the creative-at-heart to produce art through the beauty of language.


CRW 201-022: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, ADAMS L


CRW 203: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, FURIA P
Students will study the major forms of creative writing--poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction--by writers such as Sophocles, Shakespeare, Austen, Twain, Dickinson, and Hemingway.There will be a combination of lectures and small, discussion-workshop sections. Writing assignments will include both creative and analytical exercises designed to heighten student appreciation of artistic achievement in various forms. There will also be a final examination over all the reading in the course.

CRW 207-001: FICTION WRITING, SIEGRIST T
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott.
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of short fiction by reading assigned texts and writing their own stories. Students will journal about their readings and turn in regular creative exercises, culminating in full-length short stories. Class participation and attendance are essential to ensure a quality workshop experience. Imagination is also required.

CRW 207-002: FICTION WRITING, DOTSEY J
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Wiliford and Michael Martone); The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers by John Gardner.
In this course, students will learn the introductory elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively and thoughtfully; regular attendance is crucial.

CRW 207-003: FICTION WRITING, HENNESSEY C
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott.
In this course, students will learn the essential elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively, enthusiastically, and thoughtfully, and regular attendance is a must.

CRW 207-004: FICTION WRITING, DOTSEY J
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Wiliford and Michael Martone); The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers by John Gardner.
In this course, students will learn the introductory elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively and thoughtfully; regular attendance is crucial.

CRW 208-001: POETRY WRITING, JOHNSEN K
Required Texts: The Poet’s Companion by Kim Addonizio and Dorianne Laux; Best American Poetry 2011 edited by Kevin Young. Recommended Text: A Poetry Handbook by Mary Oliver
This course will serve as in introduction to reading and writing poetry. We will focus on cultivating the craft of poetry with particular emphasis on what makes a poem work—metaphor, image, musicality, voice, etc. The first half of the semester will focus on reading and discussing poetry as a group, as well as completing in-class writing exercises. Students are also expected to write short responses to poems and selections from the anthology. The second half of the semester will focus on the workshop, in which we will work to develop the critical language necessary for discussing each other's work and for critically approaching our own poems during the important process of revision.
Students should budget for photocopying.

CRW 208-002: INTRODUCTION TO POETRY WRITING, MORRIS J
Texts: The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry, Ilya Kaminsky, Susan Harris; Ordinary Genius, Kim Addonizio; Letters to a Young Poet, Rainer Maria Rilke, M.D. Herter Norton.
In this introductory course we will explore the craft of poetry. Emily Dickinson said, “If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.” As a class, we will approach poetry as a group of writers and readers in search of the same feeling that Dickinson speaks of. Students will be required to complete assigned reading, in-class writing exercises, writing of their own poetry, a presentation on a collection of poems, a final portfolio, and active participation in classroom discussion.

CRW 209-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION, VAUGHAN C
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction Vol. 1 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What is the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Creative nonfiction writers put the truth into context in a way that is unique to them, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively to identify our own stories and to learn to tell them in a way that intrigues others. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 209-002: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE NONFICTION, SKLAR E
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction, Vol. 2 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What's the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Creative nonfiction writers share their personal truth in the context of fact, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism, and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively, learn to identify our own stories, and find engaging, unique ways to tell them. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 305-001: THE CREATIVE PROCESS, GASKILL M
Prerequisite or corequisite: CRW 206, 207, 208 or 209 or consent of instructor.
Investigation through reading, lectures, discussions, writing, and exercises of the creative process in general and its particular application to literary art. Readings include studies of the creative process in a variety of other disciplines.

CRW 306-001 FORMS OF FICTION, BOYAJIAN M
This course will focus on the exploration of fictional elements (creative possibilities) in the novel. While it is primarily a reading and discussion class (not a workshop) our goal is to read these novels like writers – to zero in on authorial choices in structure, characterization, scene, setting, dialogue, etc. in an effort to further our own sensibilities and possibilities as writers.

CRW 307-001 INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, BOYAJIAN M
Students continue to develop their craft through reading, lecture/discussion of the elements of fiction, and writing exercises (at home and in-class), and then traditional workshopping of two pieces of fiction (short stories or novel chapters).

CRW 307-002 INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, DE GRAMONT
In this class, students will work on developing craft through in-class and at-home writing exercises.  These exercises should progress toward a completed piece of fiction, either a short story or a chapter of a longer work.  Each student will have a workshop for his or her completed first draft.  Prior to this workshop, each student will have two shorter workshops of a first page.  Students will read, listen to, and discuss each other’s work, as well as handing in written critiques. 

CRW 308-001: INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING, WHITE M
In this class, we’ll focus on reading and writing beautiful verse in the oldest as well as the newest poetic forms. How can a poet work in a tradition passed down through the centuries yet still speak on the page in her unique voice? Why is it that certain poems can make the hair on the back of your neck stand out, can trigger your deepest memories, can sing you into a spell? In this class, we’ll find out. We’ll read hundreds of poems, and I’ll assign exercises based on the readings, some of which will result in complete poems which you’ll present to the workshop. There will be a heavy emphasis on process and revision. Grade will be based on a final portfolio of your poems, to be submitted at the end of class, and on participation, including journal (reading response) assignments. Each student will also memorize and recite poems to the class twice during the semester.

CRW 309-001 INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE NONFICTION, HOLMAN V
This dynamic class will focus the wide variety of writing that is considered creative nonfiction. We’ll read and analyze a short work of creative nonfiction each week. Students will submit two new pieces for workshop review, provide written responses  for peer workshops, and have numerous writing exercises. We have three major goals in this class: to improve and expand your reading repertoire of published creative nonfiction, to build a common critical vocabulary with which to better analyze and discuss creative nonfiction, and to refine your writing skills. Active in-class participation (both spoken and written) is expected and essential for a good grade. The instructor will provide the class with handouts.

CRW 315-002: THE WRITING LIFE, BASS T (3 credit hours)
MW 5-6:15 p.m. CRW and PCRW majors, CRW minors. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209.
“What am I going to do with a degree in creative writing?” I get that question often from students. More often, though, I get this one from parents: “What is my child doing to do with a degree in creative writing?” The answer: plenty. And now, we have a course that will explore those options—and more. CRW 315: The Writing Life will delve into life for creative writers beyond college. We’ll focus on career options for creative writers, looking not only at graduate school applications but also job searches, writing resumes, interviewing for jobs, submitting creative work for publication, and considering alternative paths to careers (such as the Master of Arts in Teaching degree at UNCW, teaching abroad, joining the Peace Corps, or taking professional internships). In addition to career exploration, we will also spend time on creative writing promotions—we’ll use the course as a working lab to create informational materials that can be posted on the BFA Program’s Web page. [Notes: The course will count in the literature category of the CRW major. The course is open to all CRW and Pre-CRW majors in any writing genre, and all CRW minors. The meeting days and times are set deliberately to avoid conflict with other CRW classes.]

CRW 318-001: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, LINEHAN T
(FST 318) Prerequisite: PCRW, PFST, CRW, or FSTmajor; and CRW 207, CRW 208, CRW 209, or FST201 or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenplays and/or documentary scripts for television and film with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST495.

CRW 320-001: WRITERS’ WEEK FALL 2013, COX M
This two-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers’ Week. The week will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with MFA program students or alumni.  Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week.  As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 15 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 320-002: THE PROSE POEM, ADAMS L
This course will consist of a brief introduction to the contemporary prose poem, followed by workshopping of student work in this genre. The goal is to create a familiarity with the form and an understanding of its function. The texts are No Boundaries, by Ray Gonzalez, and Almost Invisible: Poems, by Mark Strand. Students will complete an analytical essay and a portfolio of their own work.

CRW 321-001,002: BOOKS & PUBLISHING, SMITH E
An introduction to the culture and commerce of books, this course examines the life cycle of a book, the people and processes involved in book publishing, and the history, business, economics, and ethics of the publishing industry. The class will involve lectures, readings, short research assignments, as well as hands-on opportunities to discover how publishing decisions are made. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.

CRW 322-001: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T
Text: The New Well-Tempered Sentence by Karen Elizabeth Gordon. [Recommended but not required: On Writing Well by William Zinsser.] CRW and PCRW majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209. This course will focus on editing literary manuscripts, mainly using each student's own creative writing. We will emphasize developing and applying skills in self-editing, grammar, mechanics, spelling, formatting, style, and other fundamentals crucial to effective, polished writing in the creative writing profession. Students will complete exercises and edit their own creative works. There will be several exams and multiple in-class exercises. Class participation is a must. An attendance policy will be enforced. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-001: BOOKBUILDING, ALVAREZ A
Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, 209, or consent of instructor. This course offers hands-on training in the basics of effective graphic design and typography for book publishing. Students will become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite—InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator—while completing a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work. The course also incorporates a survey history of publishing, with a focus on current trends and the future of the book. Students should be prepared for a rigorous, fast-paced course that requires lab work outside of class hours. [Note: Bookbuilding counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 324-001: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL, GERARD J
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions,work on a developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 324-002: COPYEDITING, PHILLIPS A
Knowing how to copyedit is a desirable job skill in publishing; it helps in developmental and substantive editing; and it provides valuable perspective in editing one’s own work. In this thorough introduction, students will learn editors’ marks and will have ample opportunity to mark copy both by hand and on screen. In addition to practicing copyediting itself, we will explore the art of creating and maintaining collegial relationships throughout the editing process, with the goal of improving our proficiency in what Carol Fisher Saller calls “working through the writer for the reader.” We will also consider levels of editing; freelance and in-house editorial procedures; making and using style sheets; effective use of style guides, with particular emphasis on the Chicago Manual of Style; and the finer points of grammar and usage. Students will be evaluated via class participation, quizzes, exams, and a final editing portfolio. Texts: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition; Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition; The Copyeditor’s Handbook, 3rd edition, by Amy Einsohn; The Subversive Copyeditor, by Carol Fisher Saller. [Note: This course counts toward the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 407-001: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING, DE GRAMONT M
In this class, we will work on craft through the study of the short story.  In addition to reading short fiction by established authors, students will compose an original short story which they will revise and, at the end of the semester, submit to a literary magazine.

CRW 409-001: ADVANCED CREATIVE NONFICTION, GESSNER D
This workshop is going to be a bit of a strange beast, really only half workshop, half something else. You will only have one traditional workshop each and therefore only one complete piece required. All of these traditional workshops will occur after fall break. The rest of the writing you do will be a series of assignments in different forms during the first half of the class. These will be work-shopped in small groups in the classroom, groups run on more of an editorial model.
This is an experimental class, but it is an experiment with a purpose. For a long time now I have come to believe that the traditional workshop is a pretty limited thing, and that it doesn’t focus enough on really teaching new possibilities, new modes, new types of writing.

CRW 418-001: SCREENWRITING II: WRITING THE FEATURE FILM, HACKLER F(FST 418) Prerequisites: FST 318 (CRW 318) or consent of instructor. The craft of screenwriting applied to the feature form.Students plan a feature-length screenplay, and write, workshop, and complete the first act.

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, STAPLES B
Students must have been admitted to the certificate program in order to receive permission to enroll in the publishing practicum
Prerequisite: CRW 321, 322, 323
A select group of students support the work of the Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, and producing books and other publications. Undergraduate practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 1.5 hour staff meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 or 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student’s convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit.

CRW 492-001: ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN THE ARTS,
MILLHONE M
This new course, offered for the first time as a trial course in Fall 2013, will be open to minors and students in the UNCW creative arts departments. The course will create a cross-disciplinary collaborative that gives student artists training and experience in the following: launching ventures incorporating artistic pursuits; innovating and exploiting new approaches to arts fundraising, marketing, and distribution; innovating commercial applications of artistic pursuits and performance; and creating and exploiting creative and business networks.The course will use existing arts entrepreneurship courses and programs, such as the NC State Arts Entrepreneurship minor, as an initial resource and model.

CRW 496-001: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING (FICTION AND CREATIVE NONFICTION) BRENNER, W
This course is the capstone learning experience for Creative Writing majors. Students will compile, polish, and submit their final BFA theses and perform a public reading of their work.  In addition, we will spend class time discussing professional topics, such as applying to graduate school, publishing your work, and finding employment after graduation.  This course is reserved for BFA students focusing in fiction or nonfiction.  You must be a CRW major (accepted into our BFA program after submission of your application portfolio), and must have successfully completed either CRW 407 or CRW 409.  Course text: The Creative Habit, by Twyla Tharp.

CRW 496-003: SENIOR SEMINAR IN POETRY, MÖRLING M
This course is for graduating BFA students. The prerequisite is CRW 408.
We will workshop poems, assemble a BFA thesis to which each student will write a critical preface. We will discuss professional issues such as applying to graduate school, publishing and what it means to be a person in the world writing poems. We will also collaborate with students in The Publishing Laboratory to create a class poetry anthology. At the end of the semester all students will give a public reading of their own work.

 

Spring 2013


CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Text: Show & Tell, 6th ed.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 203: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING
Introduction to the historical development of poetic, narrative, and other forms of creative writing. Analytical and creative assignments develop student understanding of techniques such as metrics, point of view, and narrative structure. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives. Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive.

CRW 203-004: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, HEADLEY K
Texts: Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You by Peter Cameron; The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde; Pulphead by John Jeremiah Sullivan; poetry TBD.
How do characters within a novel differ from those written for the stage? What can poets do that nonfiction writers can’t? In this reading-intensive course we will study poetry, fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction to understand the choices and limitations inherent within each genre. This class will require in-class discussion as well as analytical and creative writing. This is not a workshop class, however, so students should be prepared to read closely with an eye toward understanding form more than anything else. There will be a final exam.

CRW 207-001: FICTION WRITING, DOTSEY J
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Wiliford and Michael Martone); The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers by John Gardner.
In this course, students will learn the introductory elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively and thoughtfully; regular attendance is crucial.

CRW 207-002: FICTION WRITING, TEISER S
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Wiliford and Michael Martone); The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers by John Gardner; online course reserves.
This course will serve as an introduction to the art of fiction writing. In the first part of the course, we will read a range of short stories and discuss elements of craft. Students will respond to the stories through close readings and short creative exercises. In the second part of the course, students will write, workshop, and revise their own stories. This is a discussion based class, so attendance and participation are vital. Students will keep a journal throughout the course.

CRW 207-003: FICTION WRITING, RAY W
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott; online course reserves.
In this introductory fiction course, we will discuss the importance of story as we learn to create fresh and vibrant works of fiction. Students will read and respond to contemporary stories in addition to submitting their own short fiction for workshop and revision. Attendance and active participation in workshop and discussion are vital.

CRW 207-004: FICTION WRITING, HOFFMAN B
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott.
In this course, students will learn the introductory elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively, enthusiastically, and thoughtfully, and regular attendance is required.

CRW 208-002: POETRY WRITING, TALLMADGE G
Texts: The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry by J.D. McClatchy; A Poetry Handbook by Mary Oliver.
An introductory course to the craft of writing and reading poetry. This course will be structured so that the first half of the semester will be reading intensive and the second half will consist of writing workshops. Students will read poetry to inform their own work, and workshop their poems so they learn how to give and receive constructive criticism. I will require students to complete assigned readings, in-class writing exercises, online reading responses, write their own poetry, and be active participants in classroom discussion. A final portfolio of revised poetry will be due at the end of the semester.

CRW 208-003: POETRY WRITING, DIPERNA R
Texts: The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry by J.D. McClatchy; A Poetry Handbook by Mary Oliver.
This class will serve as an introduction to writing and reading contemporary poetry. Students will become familiar with the fundamental elements of poetry through reading and discussion, but also through experimentation in their own work. The first half of the semester will focus on reading and discussing poetry as a group, as well as completing in-class writing exercises designed to get students out of their comfort zones. Students are also expected to write short responses to poems and selections from the anthology. The second half of the semester will focus on the workshop, in which students will give and receive constructive critiques of their own poetry in order to aid the revision process. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with the landscape of contemporary American poetry, provide a language with which to discuss it, and encourage students to make thoughtful, deliberate and bold choices in their own work.  A final portfolio of revised poetry will be due at the end of the semester.

CRW 209-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION, SKLAR E
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction, Vol. 2 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What's the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Creative nonfiction writers share their personal truth in the context of fact, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism, and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively, learn to identify our own stories, and find engaging, unique ways to tell them. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 209-003: CREATIVE NONFICTION, HEADLEY K
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction Vol. 1 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What is the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Creative nonfiction writers put the truth into context in a way that is unique to them, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively to identify our own stories and to learn to tell them in a way that intrigues others. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 302-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, BRENNER W
This is reading and discussion course (not a writing workshop) in which we will examine a wide and beguiling range of narrative strategies and techniques in published contemporary creative nonfiction and documentary films, with an eye toward how student writers might borrow various aspects of story-telling craft. Books will likely include the following: Was This Man A Genius? by Julie Hecht; Born Standing Up by Steve Martin; Truth & Beauty by Ann Patchett; Goat by Brad Land; Just Kids by Patti Smith; The Orchid Thief by Susan Orlean; Pulphead by John Jeremiah Sullivan; and Edie: An American Girl by Jean Stein and George Plimpton, as well as a selection of essays by various authors.  Students will write one long essay in response to the course materials, due at semester’s end.  Attendance and active participation in discussion are considered mandatory.

CRW 303-001: FORMS OF POETRY, FURIA P
Prerequisite: CRW 208. Restricted to CRW majors and pre-CRW majors. Study of the aesthetics of poetry, poetic technique, and the history of poetic forms such as the ballad, the sonnet, the ode, and free verse, as developed by classic and contemporary writers.

CRW 306-001: FORMS OF FICTION, LEE R
In this course we’ll be reading contemporary novels; that is, novels written after the sixties. Books will include Endless Love by Scott Spencer; The Secret History by Donna Tartt; Beloved by Toni Morrison; and Operation Shylock by Philip Roth. We’ll also be reading lots of craft essays, and spending time thinking about various aspects of craft—plot, character, theme, image—can all add up to something that strikes the reader as original and new and even miraculous. Students will write creative responses to the novels, as well as one longer, more formal response to one of the books we read.

CRW 307-001: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, BRENNER W
The best writing feels urgent, authentic, and sincerely emotional, universal yet specific, unwieldy yet exactingly precise. In this class we will explore how students can apply and develop many different aspects of narrative craft, with the goal of creating really great, truly original fiction. This is a workshop course, meaning the primary text and focus of our discussions is student writing. Students will write two or three finished pieces of fiction (15–20 pages total) and occasional short creative exercises, meeting regular deadlines. We will also read a selection of recently published short fiction by a range of authors. Attendance and active participation in discussion are considered mandatory.

CRW 307-002: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, BENDER K
In this class, we'll be reading published stories and writing our own. We'll read published short stories for elenents of craft, analyzing them as writers, and generating two new short stories to be discussed in workshop.

CRW 308-001: INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING, COX M
This workshop will stress craft and extensive revision practices. Our goal is to put into practice the concepts you have learned (or are learning) in forms courses. Journal consists of responses to extensive reading assignments in modern and contemporary poetry and poetics, as well as numerous process exercises and presentations.  Individualized reading lists.

CRW 309-001: INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE NONFICTION, FURIA P
Restricted to CRW majors. Techniques of writing creative nonfiction and development of the creative process, including writing exercises, editing, and workshop discussion.

CRW 315-001: THE SHORT POEM, MÖRLING M
Charles Simic has said: “The religion of the short poem in every age and in every literature has a single commandment: Less is always more. The short poem rejects preamble and summary. It is about all and everything, the metaphysics of a few words surrounded by much silence.” In this course, we will address the multiple qualities of the short poem. How does silence help make every word tell? What is left unsaid, what is included and why? We will study how images are used in short poems as well as similes and metaphors and their intricate and far-reaching effects. We will read Wang Wei, Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes, Jean Follain, Yannis Ritsos, Anna Swir and many other poets.

CRW 316: PLAYWRITING I, CASTAGNO P
(THR 316) Prerequisite: CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209 or consent of instructor. Analysis of one-act plays and their construction; the writing of an original one-act play required..

CRW 318: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING
(FST 318) Prerequisite: PCRW, PFST, CRW or FST major, and CRW 207, CRW 208, CRW 209 or FST 201 or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenplays and/or documentary scripts for television and film with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 320-001: TURNING FACT INTO FICTION, BENDER K
In this class, we'll be reading and discussing nonfiction and fiction works by the same author, and analyzing how an author transforms real life material into art. We'll be reading work by John Cheever, Paula Fox, and Susan Orlean. Students will write short papers comparing these writers; they'll also keep a journal during class and transform some material in that journal into a story of their own.

CRW 320-002: SCENE, EDGERTON C
Students will study how a scene works in short stories and novels. Included among activities will be the reading and writing of short story scenes. Students will study how elements of a story, including use of time and point of view, help a writer to decide content, tone, and atmosphere of any particular scene. Students will evaluate each other's work and will complete short assignments and several essays. Activities will include class discussion, individual conferences with the instructor, as well as quizzes and short presentations and other activities as decided by instructor and class members.

CRW 320-004: THE ADVENTURE NARRATIVE, HOLMAN V
In this class we will read, discuss, and write about a wide variety of nonfiction adventure stories. Books will include West with the Night by Beryl Markham; Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer; The Serpent and the Rainbow by Wade Davis; Wind, Sand, and Stars by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry; Rolling to Nowhere by Ted Conover; Kon-Tiki by Thor Heyerdahl; Travels with Myself and Another by Martha Gellhorn; and No Easy Day by Kevin Maurer. We will look closely at how these stories are structured, consider research methods, and write two "adventure narratives." Kevin Maurer will visit class to speak on his experiences as an embedded reporter in Afghanistan and his experience writing about the Navy SEALS who killed Osama Bin Laden. Lisa Bertini will speak on the making of her short documentary film, The Lost Colony, about the mysterious origins and culture of Crusoe Island. In April, we will take a class adventure to Crusoe Island, located deep in the Green Swamp of North Carolina.

CRW 320-005: WRITING YOUNG ADULT FICTION, DE GRAMONT M
In this class students will work on two opening chapters of a novel for teens. We will discuss the history of the young adult novel with appropriate reading, but the main focus will be on workshop, craft, subject matter, and contemporary themes. At the end of the class students will hand in two polished chapters and an outline of a YA novel.

CRW 321-001: BOOKS & PUBLISHING, STAPLES B
An introduction to the culture and commerce of books, this course examines the life cycle of a book, the people and processes involved in book publishing, and the history, business, economics, and ethics of the publishing industry. The class will involve lectures, readings, short research assignments, as well as hands-on opportunities to discover how real-world publishing decisions are made. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 322-001: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T
Texts: The New Well-Tempered Sentence by Karen Elizabeth Gordon; On Writing Well by William Zinsser. [Recommended but not required: The Deluxe Transitive Vampire by Karen Elizabeth Gordon; Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss.]
Majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209. This course will focus on editing literary manuscripts, mainly using each student's own writing. We will emphasize developing and applying skills in self-editing, grammar, mechanics, spelling, formatting, style, and other fundamentals crucial to effective, polished writing in the creative writing profession. Students will complete exercises and edit their own creative works. There will be several exams and multiple in-class exercises. Class participation is a must. An attendance policy will be enforced. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-001: BOOKBUILDING, ANDREW S
Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, 209, or consent of instructor. This course offers hands-on training in the basics of effective graphic design and typography for book publishing. Students will become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite—InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator—while completing a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work. The course also incorporates a survey history of publishing, with a focus on current trends and the future of the book. Students should be prepared for a rigorous, fast-paced course that requires lab work outside of class hours. [Note: Bookbuilding counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 324-002: SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLISHING, GERARD J
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams—with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 407-001: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING, SIEGEL R
An advanced workshop focused on literary fiction. Course will stress the exploration of craft and the building of writing skills through exercises and two short stories. The class will also read, write about, and discuss published fiction.

CRW 408-001: ADVANCED POETRY WRITING, MESSER S
This advanced level poetry workshop will focus on creating new work, as well as looking at several collections for inspiration. Students will also be asked to write a series of poems or a long poem as a part of weekly writing and workshop assignments. Peer responses, in-class discussion, and assigned reading required. Texts may include: Mayakovsky's Revolver by Matthew Dickman; Life on Mars by Tracy K. Smith; Must a Violence by Oni Buchanan; and As Long as Trees Last by Hoa Nguyen.

CRW 418-001: SCREENWRITING II: FEATURE FILM
(FST 418) Prerequisites: FST 318 (CRW 318) or consent of instructor. Writing, revision and completion of feature-length screenplay.

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, STAPLES B
Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program in order to receive permission to enroll in the Publishing Practicum.Prerequisites: CRW 321, 322, 323.
Up to five interns support the work of The Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, and producing the senior BFA anthology in conjunction with CRW 496, the senior seminar. Practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 2-hour meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 and 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student’s convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 460-002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, SMITH E
[Prerequisites: Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program and must have completed both CRW 323 and 460-001. Permission of instructor is required.]
Want to gain experience working for a small press? A select group of undergraduate students help with the daily work of the department’s literary imprint, Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions as an internship and provides hands-on experience in our daily operations. Interns can expect to assist with the writing of press releases and other promotional materials; research sales and marketing leads; mail review copies, press releases, and other promotional materials to local, state, and national media; update our database of review outlets and bookstores; design, produce, and mail publicity kits; assist with maintenance of our Web site and social media outlets; and attend weekly staff meetings. Lookout practicum students work 8 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 2-hour meeting), under faculty supervision. Participants are selected by permission of instructor on the basis of excellent performance in previous publishing courses and demonstrated interest in the field. What students get out of the course—in advancement of their own understanding of the publishing enterprise, or in marketable skills to take with them—will be directly proportionate to their leadership, professionalism, and dedication. A brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 496-001: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, DE GRAMONT M
In this course students will compile, perfect, and submit their BFA theses, collaborate with other writers and our department’s Publishing Lab to create an anthology of BFA student work, and give a public reading of their own fiction.  The class will also include discussion of professional issues such as submitting creative work for publication, careers in writing and publishing, and applying to graduate school.

CRW 496-002: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, LEE R
The Senior Seminar is the capstone course in our BFA program. In this course writers will be producing a portfolio of their work, as well as contributing to a class anthology.  We will be workshopping student work, and reading a lot of essays on the writer’s life, and how one sustains it, both in and out of a writing community.   We’ll also be giving a public reading at the end of the semester.

CRW 496-003: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, HOLMAN V
The Senior Seminar is the capstone course in our BFA program. We have several critical goals: selection and preparation of your thesis material, creation of your critical preface, collaborating with the Publishing Laboratory students to create an anthology of prose, and preparing for your public reading at the end of the semester. We will also discuss topics pertinent to the life of the writer in the real world. Students should enter the class with a three to five page selection of prose suitable for the anthology.

CRW 498: UNDERGRADUATE INTERNSHIP IN CREATIVE WRITING (1-6 hours of credit)
Prerequisites: Junior status (59+ earned hours); completion of ENG 103 or ENG 201; nine hours of CRW writing courses, of which at least three are at the 300-400 level; GPA at least 2.0. CRW 498 offers training and practical writing experience through work in a private company or public agency. Faculty supervision and evaluation of all study and on-site activity. Open to students of junior or senior standing in all majors who have been approved by the faculty internship advisor. See Tim Bass, CRW internship coordinator.

 

Fall 2012


CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

CRW 203: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, FURIA P
Students will study the major forms of creative writing--poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction--by writers such as Sophocles, Shakespeare, Austen, Twain, Dickinson, and Hemingway.There will be a combination of lectures and small, discussion-workshop sections. Writing assignments will include both creative and analytical exercises designed to heighten student appreciation of artistic achievement in various forms. There will also be a final examination over all the reading in the course.

CRW 201-012: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, HEADLEY, K
Text: Show & Tell, 6th ed.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing aimed at developing the creative process. This course requires completing reading and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Attendance and in-class participation are essential.

CRW 201-013: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, HOFFMAN B
Text: Show & Tell, 6th ed. Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively, enthusiastically, and thoughtfully, and regular attendance is required.

CRW 207-001: INTRODUCTION TO FICTION WRITING, RAY W
In this introductory fiction course, we will discuss the importance of story as we learn to create fresh and vibrant works of fiction. Students will read and respond to contemporary stories, in addition to submitting their own short fiction for workshop and revision. Attendance and active participation in workshop and discussion are vital.

CRW 207-002: INTRODUCTION TO FICTION WRITING, HOFFMAN B
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford & Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott.
In this course, students will learn the introductory elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively, enthusiastically, and thoughtfully, and regular attendance is required.

CRW 207-003:  INTRODUCTION TO FICTION WRITING, TEISER S
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Wiliford and Michael Martone); The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers by John Gardner; online course reserves.
This course will serve as an introduction to the art of fiction writing. In the first part of the course, we will read a range of short stories and discuss elements of craft. Students will respond to the stories through close readings and short creative exercises. In the second part of the course, students will write, workshop, and revise their own stories. This is a discussion based class, so attendance and participation are vital.

CRW 207-004: INTRODUCTION TO FICTION WRITING, HENNESSEY C
What makes a story “good?” How can we use that knowledge to improve our own storytelling? In this introductory fiction course, students will gain a better understanding and appreciation of fiction by reading and responding to contemporary stories, and then by writing, workshopping, and revising their own original work. Because this is a discussion-based class, participation and attendance are vital.

CRW 208-002: INTRODUCTION TO POETRY WRITING, DIPERNA R
Texts: The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry, J.D. McClatchy; The Poetry Home Repair Manual, Ted Kooser
This class will serve as an introduction to writing and reading contemporary poetry. Students will become familiar with the fundamental elements of poetry through reading and discussion, but also through experimentation in their own work. The first half of the semester will focus on reading and discussing poetry as a group, as well as completing in-class writing exercises designed to get students out of their comfort zones. Students are also expected to write short responses to poems and selections from the anthology. The second half of the semester will focus on the workshop, in which students will give and receive constructive critiques of their own poetry in order to aid the revision process. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with the landscape of contemporary American poetry, provide a language with which to discuss it, and encourage students to make thoughtful, deliberate and bold choices in their own work.  A final portfolio of revised poetry will be due at the end of the semester.

CRW 208-002: INTRODUCTION TO POETRY WRITING, TALLMADGE G
Texts: The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry, J.D. McClatchy; A Poetry Handbook , Mary Oliver
An introductory course to the craft of writing and reading poetry. The course will be structured so that the first half of the semester will be reading intensive and the second half will consist of writing workshops. Students will read poetry in order to inform their own work, and workshop their poems in order to learn how to give and receive constructive criticism. Students will be required to complete assigned readings, in-class writing exercises, online reading responses, writing of their own poetry, and be active participants in classroom discussion. A final portfolio of revised poetry will be due at the end of the semester.

CRW 208-003: INTRODUCTION TO POETRY WRITING, MORRIS J
Texts:The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry, J.D. McClatchy;A Poetry Handbook, Mary Oliver.
In this introductory course we will explore the craft of poetry. Emily Dickinson said, “If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I knowthatis poetry.” As a class, we will approach poetry as a group of writers and readers in search of the same feeling that Dickinson speaks of. Students will be required to complete assigned readings, in-class writing exercises, writing of their own poetry, a presentation on a collection of poems, a final portfolio, and active participation in classroom discussion.

CRW 209-001: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE NONFICTION, TRAN E
Texts: Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: Work from 1970 to the Present; On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser.
Reality TV, celebrity gossip blogs, late night news—all bits of the “real world," entertaining yet somehow also a bit hollow. How do we spin these stories, and more importantly, our own stories, so that they’re fulfilling? In creative nonfiction, we’ll use all the tricks of the trades, steal from fiction, poetry, films, plays, to craft narratives that are true, compelling, and resonant. From personal essays to memoir to lyric essays to reportage, we’ll read, work on exercises, and workshop student pieces to understand what this genre is all about.

CRW 209-002: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE NONFICTION, HEADLEY K
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction, Vol. 1 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What is the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Creative nonfiction writers put the truth into context in a way that is unique to them, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively to identify our own stories and to learn to tell them in a way that intrigues others. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop component of the class

CRW 209-003: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE NONFICTION, HUBER L
We tell true stories every day to our friends, our families, on our Twitter page, and in our Facebook statuses. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will explore how to tell true stories in a meaningful and artistic way. The first half of the semester will be spent reading and comparing published works of creative nonfiction: the memoir, the essay, and creative reportage. The second half of the semester students will use the techniques discovered and examined in the readings to create their own works of creative nonfiction. We will be writing in-class assignments and longer pieces of nonfiction to be shared and discussed in a workshop setting.

CRW 303-001: FORMS OF POETRY, COX, M
A study of practical poetics focusing on free verse prosody against a background of traditional metrical prosody, as well a decade by decade look at 20th century American poetry and its influences. Format: seminar, close reading and discussion,exercises. Texts: A Profile of Twentieth-Century American Poetry;Dictionary of Poetic Terms, ed. Myers;  Poetry Anthology (TBA); and numerous essay handouts on Blackboard.

CRW 305-001: THE CREATIVE PROCESS, GASKILL M
Prerequisite or corequisite: CRW 206, 207, 208 or 209 or consent of instructor.
Investigation through reading, lectures, discussions, writing, and exercises of the creative process in general and its particular application to literary art. Readings include studies of the creative process in a variety of other disciplines.

CRW 306-001: FORMS OF FICTION, SIEGEL R
This course is an exploration of the major forms of literary fiction: the short story; the linked short-story collection; the novella; and the novel. We will read, write about and discuss examples of these forms with an eye to issues of craft, looking at how they are put together and how they work. The ultimate aim is to learn how to read like a writer.

CRW 306-002: FORMS OF FICTION, DE GRAMONT M
In this course, we will read a wide variety of short stories. Students will write responses analyzing the stories in terms of craft and also write short creative exercises responding to the stories.

CRW 307-001: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, DE GRAMONT, M
In this course, students will work on developing their craft through in-class and at-home writing exercises.  These exercises should progress toward a completed piece of fiction, either a short story or a chapter of a longer work.  Each student will have a workshop for his or her completed first draft. 

CRW 307-002: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, BENDER K
This is a class in developing skills and craft as a writer. The first half of class, we'll be reading literary short stories and doing exercises in which students will practice elements of craft. The second half of class, students will be writing and discussing a longer story.

CRW 309-001: INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE NONFICTION, HOLMAN V
This dynamic class will focus the wide variety of writing that is considered creative nonfiction. We’ll read and analyze work from two textbooks: Philip Lopate’s The Personal Essay and Becky Bradway's and Doug Hesse’s Creating Nonfiction. Lectures and group discussions will address specific issues of technique and craft. We will also read several book length works of nonfiction including Autobiography of a Face by Lucy Grealy;  The Boys of My Youth by Joann Beard,  and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. Be prepared to write. Students will submit two new 3000 word pieces for workshop review, complete one in-class presentation, provide written responses  for peer workshops, and have numerous writing exercises. We have three major goals in this class: to improve and expand your reading repertoire of published creative nonfiction, to build a common critical vocabulary with which to better analyze and discuss creative nonfiction, and to refine your writing skills. Active in-class participation (both spoken and written) is expected and essential for a good grade.

CRW 314-001: LITERARY TRANSLATION, MÖRLING M
Octavio Paz said: “Translation is an art of analogy, the art of finding correspondences. An art of shadows and echoes…” Charles Baudelaire said that poetry is essentially analogy. The idea of universal correspondence comes from the idea that language is a micro cosmos, a double of the universe. Between the language of the universe and the universe of language, there is a bridge, a link: poetry. The poet, says Baudelaire, is the translator.”
In this class we will read multiple translations of single poems and examine the choices and strategies of translation. In addition, each student in the class will also provide weekly contributions of his or her own translation of given poems and passages of prose. These translations will serve as focal points for the larger subject of translation, that of the poet or writer as translator. Readings will include selections from Swedish, German, French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Eastern European, Spanish and South American writers. Knowledge of a second language is welcome but not necessary.

CRW 315-001: CONFESSIONAL POETRY, ADAMS L
This course is not for the squeamish, as we will read poetry that deals with alcohol and drug abuse, suicide, molestation, emotional abuse, insanity, etc. In more academic terms, this course is an examination of the Confessional Poetry movement, spanning from Robert Lowell and Ann Sexton to more contemporary practitioners. In addition to work by Lowell (Life Studies) and Sexton (selected poems), we will read collections by Kim Addonizio (Tell Me), Nick Flynn (Some Ether), Frannie Lindsay (Lamb), Debra Nystrom (Bad River Road), Sharon Olds (One Secret Thing), Nancy Pearson (Two Minutes of Light), and Daniel Nathan Terry (Waxwings—the full-length collection). Students are responsible for completing a critical/analytical essay (midterm), and a final portfolio consisting of two confessional poems and a critical introduction.

CRW 318-001: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, BUTTINO L
(FST 318) Prerequisite: PCRW, PFST, CRW or FST major, and CRW 207, CRW 208, CRW 209 or FST 201 or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenplays and/or documentary scripts for television and film with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 318-002: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, LINEHAN T
FST and CRW majors only. Pre-requisite: FST 201; or CRW 206, 207, 208, or 209. To immerse you in the fundamentals of writing and work shopping the short script from concept to completed and revised first draft. Topics include: concept, formatting, story structure, character development, conflict, visible outer motivation, dialogue, scene writing, and writing for emotional impact, among other things.

CRW 318-003: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, HACKLER F
Theory and practice of writing scripts for motion pictures, with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495. cross-listed with Film Studies

CRW 320-002: THE PROSE POEM, ADAMS L
This course will consist of a brief introduction to the contemporary prose poem, followed by workshopping of student work in this genre. The goal is to create a familiarity with the form and an understanding of its function. The texts are No Boundaries, by Ray Gonzalez, and The Circus Poems, by Alex Grant. Students will complete an analytical essay and a portfolio of their own work.

CRW 320-004: POETRY AND MUSIC, WHITE M
In this special topics course, we will consider the relationship between poetry and popular song, beginning with the tradition of the English ballad, continuing through the evolution of Renaissance forms, and winding up with contemporary American poets who work with hybrid forms. Requirements will include a long research paper, a creative project (in poetry or prose), and one in-class presentation.

CRW 322-001: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T
Texts: The New Well-Tempered Sentence, by Karen Elizabeth Gordon, and On Writing Well, by William Zinsser. [Recommended but not required: The Deluxe Transitive Vampire, by Karen Elizabeth Gordon, and Eats, Shoots & Leaves, by Lynne Truss.]
Majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209. This course will focus on editing literary manuscripts, mainly using each student's own writing. We will emphasize developing and applying skills in self-editing, grammar, mechanics, spelling, formatting, style, and other fundamentals crucial to effective, polished writing in the creative writing profession. Students will complete exercises and edit their own creative works. There will be several exams and multiple in-class exercises. Class participation is a must. An attendance policy will be enforced.
[Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 320-001: WRITERS WEEK SYMPOSIUM, COX M
This course accompanies Writers Week. Students in the class will help organize the week, during which visiting writers come to campus to give reading and craft lectures. We will read the work of the visiting writers prior to their arrival, and students will conference with one of the visiting writers in their genre.

CRW 324-001: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL, GERARD J
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on a developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 324-001: EDITING THE ANTHOLOGY, STAPLES B
Prerequisite: CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209 or consent of instructor. This is an advanced editing course that will explore complex concerns of the editorial process through the creation of a themed anthology. Students will examine themed anthologies with an editorial eye (The Vintage Book of Amnesia, Monsters: A Book of Literary Sightings, the anthologies of Alberto Manguel). Students will create proposals for a new anthology, and the class—acting as an editorial board—will choose the topic for the semester. As students work to choose selections for their anthology, we'll explore both macro and micro editorial concerns. What exactly do editors do? How do editors cultivate and define an aesthetic? What makes a piece of work successful? How do editors maximize the success of a piece through editorial changes? How is an anthology curated, and what larger cultural questions come into play in choosing the work? How do rights and permissions work? Each student will write a book proposal, create their own table of contents for their anthology, justify their choices, line edit a selection in detail, and write an editorial introduction.
[Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 407-001: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING, LEE R
Texts: Endless Love, by Scott Spencer; The Secret History, by Donna Tartt
The core of this course will be student work. We’ll think on each other’s work, isolating various important qualities in fiction writing—theme, setting, character, and plot.

CRW 409-001: ADVANCED CREATIVE NONFICTION, HOLMAN V
In this upper-level workshop we’ll continue to write, read, and study a variety of creative nonfiction forms. Students will submit two new works of creative nonfiction to be reviewed in workshop. We will also read extensively and experiment with in and out of class writing exercises.
Texts will include: Francine Prose, Reading Like a Writer; Eula Biss, No Man's Land; John Jeremiah Sullivan, Pulphead.

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, STAPLES B
Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program in order to receive permission to enroll in the Publishing Practicum.
Prerequisites: CRW 321, 322, 323
Up to five interns support the work of The Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, and producing the senior BFA anthology in conjunction with CRW 496, the senior seminar. Practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 2-hour meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 and 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student’s convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit.
[Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 496: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING
Prerequisite: Senior standing and CRW 407, CRW 408 or CRW 409 or consent of instructor. Majors only. Seminar addressing issues of the profession, including preparing a manuscript for submission to publishers, publishing, advanced study, the writing life, ethics, and employment. Senior thesis, chapbook created in conjunction with the UNCW Publishing Laboratory, and public oral presentation of creative work required.

 

Spring 2012

CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING

Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

CRW 201-007: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, TALLMADGE G

Text: Show & Tell, 6th ed. Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

CRW 201-008: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, NEWPORT J

Text: Show & Tell, 6th ed. How does fiction work? Does poetry have to rhyme? What is creative nonfiction, anyhow? This online course provides an overview of fundamental principles and techniques of the major forms of creative writing, as well as experience in producing each. Weekly coursework includes interactive assignments, lecture notes, reading, and journal exercises leading to the creation of original works of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

CRW 203-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, LICHTMAN J

Texts: A Visit From the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan; Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You by Peter Cameron; Clybourne Park by Bruce Norris; online course reserves. CRW 203 is a reading class. We will study the literature of the new millennium (works published 2000 or later) in all four genres—fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry and drama—in order to introduce writers to textual analysis from a standpoint of craft. Note that while there is some creative writing involved, this is not a workshop, but rather a class designed to teach students how to read as writers. Since this is a discussion-based course, attendance is essential, as is vocal participation in every class meeting.

CRW 203-002: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, LA LONDE-PINKSTON J

Required Texts: An Exaltation of Forms, Ed. Finch and Varnes; Feed by M.T. Anderson; Antigone by Sophocles, Prestwick House edition; The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, Dover Thrift edition; Sold by Patricia McCormick; The Bible Salesman by Clyde Edgerton. In this class, students will approach literature from the practicing writer’s perspective. We will read the major genres of creative writing—poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction—with special attention to how form shapes meaning. By exploring both classic and contemporary works, students will learn about the foundations of literary technique and examine how these ideas have evolved over time, eventually laying the groundwork for contemporary literature. Students should expect to participate enthusiastically in the discussion of assigned readings and write both creative and analytical responses to the works covered in class.

CRW 203-003: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, FULTON J

In this course, we will study the major forms of creative writing—poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction. A major goal of the course will be to understand how form affects content. Course texts will be drawn from a diverse group of places and time periods,from ancient Greece to contemporary America. There will be a combination of lectures and in-class writing exercises. Writing assignments will be both analytical and creative in nature. There willbe a final examination over all the reading in the course.

CRW 203-004: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, MCCOY K

Texts: Show & Tell, 6th ed.; Brief Encounters with Che Guevara by Ben Fountain; The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien; Rolling Nowhere by Ted Conover; Song Poems by Brigit Pegeen Kelly; Endarkenment by Jeffrey McDaniel; plays TBA. Students will gain a new perspective of writing by reading fiction, plays, poetry, and nonfiction. We will examine the evolution of writing and how literary techniques such as dialogue, scene, imagery, and reflection echo and sustain throughout each genre. Imagery isn’t reserved for just poems, and suspense isn’t only reserved for fiction. We will discover how scenes develop characters, and how reflection helps us to better understand the human condition. All genres have an exchange with their audience, which bridges the gap between our shared human experience. And the students will leave the classroom with a broader understanding about writing and the world.

CRW 207-001: FICTION WRITING, LICHTMAN J

Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford & Michael Martone); How Fiction Works by James Wood; online course reserves. Students will learn the introductory elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing, workshopping, and revising their own short fiction. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, and thus, attendance is essential, as is vocal participation in every class meeting.

CRW 207-002: FICTION WRITING, JOHNSON N

Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford & Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott. What does fiction offer that no other kind of storytelling can?
In this course we will use our growing knowledge of contemporary fiction to become writers who value originality and authenticity, risk and clarity. Through literature discussion, writing exercises, and the creating and workshopping of our own short stories, we will begin to learn just what constitutes effective storytelling. We will also bring in other media (film, music, visual art, and more) to inform our understanding of how fiction can be dynamic and engaging. Regular attendance and energetic participation are required.

CRW 207-003: FICTION WRITING, HOFFMAN B

Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford & Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott. In this course, students will learn the introductory elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively, enthusiastically, and thoughtfully, and regular attendance is required.

CRW 207-004: Fiction Writing, RAY W

In this introductory fiction course, we will discuss the importance of story as we learn to create fresh and vibrant works of fiction. Students will read and respond to contemporary stories, in addition to submitting their own short fiction for workshop and revision. Attendance and active participation in workshop and discussion are vital.

CRW 208-001: POETRY WRITING, LA LONDE-PINKSTON J

Texts: American Poetry, 8th ed. (edited by A. Poulin, Jr. and Michael Waters); The Poetry Home Repair Manual by Ted Kooser. What is poetry? Louis Simpson gives the following answer: “Like a shark, it contains a shoe. / It must swim for miles through the desert / Uttering cries that are almost human.” In this course, we will explore this question and attempt to find our own answers by examining the work of contemporary poets—delving deeply into the craft decisions these poets make—and by writing and revising our own poems. The first part of this course will be devoted to studying the alchemy of successful poems in conjunction with writing exercises designed to stimulate creativity. The second half of this course will consist of workshops in which students will read and critique the work of their peers. Students will write responses to assigned readings, and submit a final portfolio of four revised poems along with a preface that examines their own aesthetic choices.

CRW 208-002: POETRY WRITING, DIPERNA R

This introductory course will offer an intensive mix of reading and writing poetry. Students will be reading both traditional and experimental poetry, highly influential poets and emerging voices, and American poets as well as international ones. In the latter half of the semester, students will write and share their poetry with their classmates and discuss it as a group. The goal of this workshop is to learn the process of giving and receiving constructive criticism, and to provide insight into how to revise and improve their work. Students will be required to complete assigned readings, in-class writing exercises, reading responses, writing of their own poetry, and active, positive participation in classroom discussion. A final portfolio will be due at the end of the semester.

CRW 208-003: POETRY WRITING, CHAO B

Texts: Poet's Choice by Edward Hirsch; Pleasure by Gary Young. This is an introduction to writing poetry. As a class we will approach poetry as writers, gathering both inspiration and instruction from the poetry we encounter in readings as well as each other. We will discuss and critique our own poems in a workshop setting. Needless to say, active participation is essential. Requirements include weekly reading assignments, a presentation on a collection of poems, and the completion of at least three revised poems.

CRW 208-004: POETRY WRITING, FULTON J

Text:The Poetry Home Repair Manual by Ted Kooser. In this class, we will workshop student-written poetry for about two-thirds of our time. The remaining third will be spent on in-class exercises and discussion. Students are responsible for reading poems assigned from the text every week and for writing a response to those poems. Students will also be responsible for turning in revised versions of approximately five poems at the end of the semester.

CRW 209-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION, MCCOY K

Texts: The Best American Essays of the Century ed. Joyce Carol Oates; Creative Nonfiction: Researching and Crafting Stories of Real Life by Philip Gerard.
This course is an introduction to creative nonfiction: how to read it and how to write it. We will discuss and dissect the different forms of this genre with both texts and documentaries. Once we deconstruct the form, and view it as an X-ray, we will construct our own nonfiction and workshop our creations. This course will help students gain a better understanding about nonfiction and why it matters in our world today.

CRW 209-002: CREATIVE NONFICTION, HEADLEY, K

Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction, Vol. 1 edited by Lee Gutkind. What is the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Creative nonfiction writers put the truth into context in a way that is unique to them, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively to identify our own stories and to learn to tell them in a way that intrigues others. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 209-003: CREATIVE NONFICTION, TRAN E

Texts: The New Kings of Nonfiction edited by Ira Glass, Holidays on Ice by David Sedaris, On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser. Reality TV, celebrity gossip blogs, late night news—all bits of the “real world,” entertaining yet somehow also a bit hollow. How do we spin these stories, and more importantly, our own stories, so that they’re fulfilling? In creative nonfiction, we’ll use all the tricks of the trades, steal from fiction, poetry, films, plays, to craft narratives that are true, compelling, and resonant. From personal essays to memoir to lyric essays to reportage, we’ll read, work on exercises, and workshop student pieces to understand what this genre is all about.

CRW 302-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, MESSER S

CRW 304-001: FORMS OF DRAMATIC WRITING, FURIA P

Students will study examples of dramatic writing from classical Greek drama through Renaissance and Restoration drama, to contemporary plays, screenplays, and musical theater and film libretti. Authors studied include Sophocles, Shakespeare, Sheridan, Shaw, and Hansberry. In addition to writing essays about form in dramatic writing, students will write creative exercises in scene development, dialogue, and other aspects of dramatic form. [Class sessions include extended time for viewing filmed versions of plays and films and required attendance at a UNCW production of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest.]

CRW 306-001: FORMS OF FICTION, BENDER K

In this course, we will read a wide variety of short stories. Students will write responses analyzing the stories in terms of craft and also write short creative exercises responding to the stories.

CRW 307-001: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, SIEGEL R

Prerequisite, 207. This class is a workshop on the writing of literary fiction, meaning fiction that explores character through language (think Raymond Carver rather than Stephen King). Students will write two new drafts of short stories and critique each other's work in class. In addition, we will explore the creative processes and build skills through short writing exercises, and read (and write about) published fiction.

CRW 307-002: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, DE GRAMONT M

In this class, students will work on developing our craft by writing pieces of fiction for workshop. The will hand in two pieces of original writing for workshop, as well as perform in-class exercise geared toward improving class. Students will read and discuss each other’s work and hand in written critiques.

CRW 308-001: INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING, ADAMS L

Pre-requisite: CRW 208. This course is intended for poets who have acquired a basic knowledge of the craft and who now wish to hone their skills. The majority of class time will be spent workshopping student work, but we will also read and discuss three collections of contemporary poetry (Jason Mott, …hide behind me…; David Hernandez, Hoodwinked; Wistawa Szymborska, Here). Requirements include responses to each of these collections, as well as written responses to the work of peers. Final portfolio will consist of an analytical introduction and revisions of workshopped poems.

CRW 309-001: INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING, BRENNER W

The best creative nonfiction makes us interested in subjects we didn’t think we had any interest in. Regardless of subject, the best essays—or memoirs, profiles, biographies, etc.—feel urgent, authentic, and beguiling, universal yet specific, large in scale yet precise in detail. In this class students will work on developing and applying their narrative craft, with the goal of creating really great, truly original creative nonfiction.This is a workshop course, meaning the primary text and focus of our discussions is student writing. Students will write two or three finished pieces (15–20 pages total) and occasional short creative exercises, meeting regular deadlines. We will also read a selection of recently published nonfiction by a range of authors. Attendance and active participation in discussion are considered mandatory.

CRW 316-001: PLAYWRITING I, CASTAGNO P

Prerequisite: ENG 201. Analysis of one-act plays and their construction; the writing of an original one-act play is required.

CRW 318-001: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING

FST and CRW majors only. Pre-requisite: FST 201; or CRW 206, 207, 208, or 209. To immerse you in the fundamentals of writing and work shopping the short script from concept to completed and revised first draft. Topics include: concept, formatting, story structure, character development, conflict, visible outer motivation, dialogue, scene writing, and writing for emotional impact, among other things.

CRW 320-001: TURNING FACT INTO FICTION, BENDER K

This course incorporates both reading and creative writing. Students will read nonfiction and fictional works by the same author—The Journals of John Cheever and Collected Stories of John Cheever, and the memoir, Borrowed Finery, and The Widow's Children by Paula Fox. We will also read the nonfiction work The Orchid Thief and see the movie Adaptation. We will discuss the ways in which writers transform their life experiences into fiction. Students will write short papers comparing the different works; they will also keep journals and transform their own experience into a short story that they will put up for workshop.

CRW 320-002: SCENE, EDGERTON C

Students will study how a scene works in short stories and novels. Included among activities will be the reading and writing of short story scenes. Students will study how elements of a story, including use of time and point of view, help a writer to decide content, tone, and atmosphere of any particular scene. Students will evaluate each other's work and will complete short assignments and several essays. Activities will include class discussion, individual conferences with the instructor, as well as quizzes and short presentations and other activities as decided by instructor and class members.

CRW 320-003: THE ART OF THE PERSONAL ESSAY, DE GRAMONT M

Our private stories can be the most powerful avenue to public truths. In this class we will learn how to combine our own experience with research to create an essay that is both personal and meaningful to general readers. We will study and write the personal essay using workshops, journal-keeping, and research as a means to creating work with larger and more socially relevant implications.

CRW 321-001: BOOKS & PUBLISHING, SMITH E

An introduction to the culture and commerce of books, this course examines the life cycle of a book, the people and processes involved in book publishing, and the history, business, economics, and ethics of the publishing industry. The class will involve lectures, readings, short research assignments, as well as hands-on opportunities to discover how real-world publishing decisions are made. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 322-001: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T

Texts: The New Well-Tempered Sentence by Karen Elizabeth Gordon; On Writing Well by William Zinsser. [Recommended but not required: The Deluxe Transitive Vampire by Karen Elizabeth Gordon; Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss.]
Majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209. This course will focus on editing literary manuscripts, mainly using each student's own writing. We will emphasize developing and applying skills in self-editing, grammar, mechanics, spelling, formatting, style, and other fundamentals crucial to effective, polished writing in the creative writing profession. Students will complete exercises and edit their own creative works. There will be several exams and multiple in-class exercises. Class participation is a must. An attendance policy will be enforced. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-001: BOOKBUILDING, GONZALEZ-MORENO, A

Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, 209, or consent of instructor. This course offers intensive, hands-on training in book design and production using desktop publishing technologies. Students develop skills through a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work, in a small edition. Students should gain from this course: basic software skills, a heightened graphic design aesthetic, an understanding of how books are built and produced, and a manuscript to bookshelf. Students should know this course is rigorous, fast-paced, and requires lab work outside of class hours. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 324-001: MAGAZINE WRITING & EDITING, HOLMAN V

This course will cover the basics of professional magazine writing. Students will write three articles (personal essay, issue-based article, and profile). We will cover basic editorial terminology, review editorial marks, and discuss how to decide where to submit your work. In addition, we will cover how to locate and interview experts and learn how to keep notes to review with fact-checkers. Each student will submit at least one selection to a real world publication. Professionalism, concision, attention to detail, and excellent grammar required.

CRW 407-001 ADVANCED FICTION WRITING, LEE R

Text: Wonder Boys by Michael Chabon, plus various short stories. The core of this course will be student work. We’ll think on each other’s work, isolating various important qualities in fiction writing—theme, setting, character, and plot.

CRW 408-001: ADVANCED POETRY WRITING, WHITE M

This will be a traditional creative writing workshop devoted to peer review of original poetry. Much of class will be devoted to workshopping poems in both traditional and experimental forms. Poems for workshop will be carefully critiqued beforehand, and each student will then contribute to a positive yet challenging in-class discussion of the work. We will also read and discuss several essays on poetic craft. Final grade will be based on a portfolio which will include at least two drafts of about six workshopped poems, as well as journal responses to assigned readings.

CRW 418-001: SCREENWRITING II: FEATURE FILM

FST and CRW majors only. Pre-requisite: FST 318 or CRW 318. Planning a feature script, and writing, workshopping and completing the first act.

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, SHEATS L

A select group of students support the work of the Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, and producing books and other publications. Undergraduate practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 1.5 hour staff meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 or 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Students must also have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student’s convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit.

CRW 460-002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM (LOOKOUT BOOKS), SMITH E

[Prerequisites: Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program and must have completed both CRW 323 and 460-001. Permission of instructor is required.] Want to gain experience working for a small press? Up to five undergraduate students help with the daily work of the department’s literary imprint, Lookout Books. The practical course functions primarily as an internship and provides hands-on experience in our daily operations. Interns can expect to assist with the writing of press releases and other promotional materials; research sales and marketing leads; mail review copies, press releases, and other promotional materials to local, state, and national media; update our database of review outlets and bookstores; design, produce, and mail publicity kits; assist with maintenance of our Web site and social media outlet; and attend weekly staff meetings. Lookout practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 2-hour meeting), under faculty supervision. Participants are selected by permission of instructor on the basis of excellent performance in previous publishing courses and demonstrated interest in the field. What students get out of the course—in advancement of their own understanding of the publishing enterprise, or in marketable skills to take with them—will be directly proportionate to their leadership, professionalism, and dedication. A brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 496-001: SENIOR SEMINAR IN FICTION, SIEGEL R

The senior seminar is a capstone course for graduating majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 407. Students will consolidate and polish a selection oftheir fiction from previous workshopsinto a manuscript, thenread from that manuscriptin a public presentation. Each student will also participate in a publishing project that incorporates a piece from his or her manuscript. Students should come prepared to submit at the start of the semester one piece of prose for a class anthology to be edited and published by The Publishing Laboratory. Additionally,the classwill address questions about the writing life after graduation, includinghow to keep reading and writing productively.

CRW 496-002: SENIOR SEMINAR IN PROSE, HOLMAN V

The Senior Seminar is the capstone course in our BFA program. We have several critical goals: selection and preparation of your thesis material, creation of your critical preface, collaborating with the Publishing Laboratory students to create an anthology of prose, and preparing for your public reading at the end of the semester. We will also discuss topics pertinent to the life of the writer in the world such as how to submit work to literary journals, applying (or not) to graduate school, how to continue writing outside of the university, etc. Students should enter the class with a three to five page double spaced selection of prose suitable for the anthology.

CRW 496-003: SENIOR SEMINAR IN POETRY, COX M

The senior seminar is a capstone course for graduating BFA majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 408. You will consolidate and polish a selection of your poetry from previous workshops into a manuscript, write a critical preface, then read from that manuscript in a public presentation. You will also collaborate with Publishing Laboratory students to create an anthology that incorporatespoems from your manuscript. To this latter end, you must be prepared to immediately provide five poems from which to choose anthology content. Relevant issues of the profession (publication, graduate school, etc.) will be discussed as we go.

CRW 498: UNDERGRADUATE INTERNSHIP IN CREATIVE WRITING (1-6 hours of credit)

Prerequisites: Junior status (59+ earned hours); completion of ENG 103 or ENG 201; nine hours of CRW writing courses, of which at least three are at the 300-400 level; GPA at least 2.0. CRW 498 offers training and practical writing experience through work in a private company or public agency. Faculty supervision and evaluation of all study and on-site activity. Open to students of junior or senior standing in all majors who have been approved by the faculty internship advisor. See Tim Bass, CRW internship coordinator.


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