Student resources

Getting library help is often your first step in any writing assignment. This set of links will help you get started.

Writing Center

This free, one-on-one tutoring center will help you focus and revise your compositions. Here are some resources.

Hours

Click on the link to bring up the current Writing Center hours.

Professional Writing

Want to be competitive in the marketplace? The complete outline of courses for this option will help you decide what direction you need to go.

navigating the center

Don't know how to schedule an appointment? Confused as to what you should bring to your Writing Center consultation? Everything is answered here.

How to study

If deadlines make you tear out your hair, here is a nice place to start. Check out the study guides, sample timetables, handouts and links at this Writing Center page.


 
   
   
Pedro Cortes chats with Wentworth advisor Dr. Nick Laudadio about his Fellowship trip that followed in the footsteps of James Joyce.

About English Major Options

Students can choose from among three options: Literary Studies, Professional Writing, and Teacher Licensure.

The Literary Studies Option

Literary studies cultivates an intellectual curiosity and a broad and intensive knowledge of literature, critical theories, and the varied nature of contemporary writers and their works.

A student in this option studies classic works and those out of the mainstream, as well as literary theories that cut through a cross section of viewpoints. In this way, students develop their critical thinking, reading, writing, and communication skills.

Undergraduate majors take a range of courses that are geared to connect them globally -- across the centuries and across cultures. The option also helps the student put these literary works in perspective, taking their place in history and in society.

By stressing critical thinking, the study of language itself, and cutting-edge technology and research skills, the literary studies option also encourages students to develop the kind of mental flexibility that will serve them well in a wide range of careers. 

Students hone their analytical skills through:

  • reading primary and secondary texts in a close, critical way,
  • learning primary research and technological skills,
  • writing in a disciplined way by outlining, drafting, revising, and reflecting on their own — and others’— work
  • and creating original, sustained, thoughtful, and persuasive arguments. 

Building this foundation of knowledge and acquiring these analytic and creative skills prepare students for a broad array of careers, including teaching, law, business, editing, writing, public relations, and reporting, among many others. See our Alumni Update page for a look at what our graduates are doing.

As well as paving the way to a successful future, students who focus on literary studies also gain an awareness of themselves as members of the community and can participate in all manner of social, cultural, and political debates.

42 hours, as follows:

  • ENG 205: Introduction to Literary Studies
  • A course in Shakespeare (ENG 332 or 333)
  • A course in literature before 1900 (ENG 211, 223, 335, 336, 350, 430, 431, 432)
  • A course in literature after 1900 (ENG 212, 224, 337, 338, 351, 352, 372, 374, 375)
  • Two courses (6 hours) in diverse literary cultures (ENG 209, 210, 225, 226, 232, 233, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 355, 356, 370, 371)
  • ENG 202 or 204
  • A writing course (ENG 302, 303, 304, 306, 307, 309, 310, 311, 312, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318)
  • A course in the English language (ENG 320, 321, 322, 323, or 324)
  • A course in literary criticism (ENG 386 or 387)
  • Three additional ENG elective courses
  • A senior seminar (ENG 495)

See printable Worksheet with requirements.
(Worksheet for Literature Option before Fall 2010)

More of what to expect from this course of study on our Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) page. (opens as a PDF)

 

The Professional Writing Option

Professional Writing prepares students to analyze and address a variety of writing situations, to read texts critically, and to write in an effective, informed, and ethical manner in a range of organizational contexts. Many courses incorporate technologies for writing, research, and communication. This option prepares students for careers in writing, editing, and the myriad other fields that rely on written communication. It provides concentrated training in such areas as journalism, technical writing, business writing, and public discourse, while developing an understanding of how language shapes our world.

42 hours, as follows:

  • ENG 204: Introduction to Professional Writing
  • ENG 205: Introduction to Literary Studies
  • A course in editing (ENG 309 or 310)
  • A course in texts and technology (ENG 314 or 319)
  • A course in rhetorical theory (ENG 388 or 389)
  • Two of the following courses (ENG 303, 307, 316, 318)
  • Two of the following courses (ENG 302, 304, 312, 313)
  • Two additional writing courses (ENG 202, 302, 303, 304, 306, 307, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 388, 389, 498; CRW 209, 309, 321, 323, 324, 409, 460)
  • One additional literature course (ENG 209, 210, 211, 212, 223, 224, 225, 226, 230, 232, 233, 290, 332, 333, 335, 336, 337, 338, 340, 341, 342, 343, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 386, 387, 390, 430, 431, 432, 490, 495)
  • One English language course (ENG 320, 321, 322, 323, 324)
  • ENG 496: Senior Seminar

See printable Worksheet with requirements.
(Worksheet for Professional Writing Option before Fall 2009)

More of what to expect from this course of study on our Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) page. (opens as a PDF)

 

The Teacher Licensure Option

This option prepares students to teach English at the secondary level. The Teacher Education Program requirements, plus 42 hours, as follows:

  • Seven courses in literature:
    • ENG 205: "Introduction to Literary Studies"
    • A Shakespeare course (ENG 332 or 333)
    • ENG 381: "Literature for Young Adults"
    • ENG 382: "Ways of Teaching Literature" or 383: "Classics Reconsidered"
    • Two Courses in American Literature
    • A course in non-Western or non-canonical literature (ENG 340, 341, 342, 356)
      (In addition to Shakespeare, one of the above must be a course in literature before 1900.)
  • ENG 304: "Writing for Teachers"
  • An additional writing course
  • Two courses in English language (ENG 320 and ENG 321)
  • Two additional ENG electives
  • A senior seminar (ENG 495 or 496)

See printable Worksheet with requirements.
School of Education program requirements (pdf)

More of what to expect from this course of study on our Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) page. (opens as a PDF)


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