Assessment at UNCW

General Education Assessment

2015 Annual Report

Demographic and Preparedness findings
  • There was a statistically significant difference between the mean scores of male vs. female students for DV2 and DV4, such that work from males scored higher than work from females. There was also a statistically significant difference between the mean scores of transfer students vs. non-transfer students for DV2, with work from non-transfer students scoring higher than work from transfer students. Additionally, there was a statistically significant difference between the scores of honor students vs. non-honor students for DV1, DV2, and DV4 such that work from honor students scored higher than work from non-honor students. There were no statistically significant differences between the means, medians, and score distributions of ethnicity groups or Isaac Bear vs. non-Isaac Bear students.
  • To compare scores based on number of credit hours completed, two methods were used. First, students were grouped into four categories, those having completed 0-30 credit hours, 31-60 credit hours, 61-90, and over 90 credit hours. Comparison of means (using ANOVA), medians (using Independent Samples test of medians) and distributions (using the Mann-Whitney U statistic) showed a statistically significant difference between the groups for DV4 with students with over 91 credit hours scoring the highest followed by work from students with 31-60 credit hours, 0-30 credit hours, and finally students with 61-90 credit hours. Looking at Spearman rho correlation coefficients, the number of total hours completed was significantly positively correlated with DV4 (.202*). Additionally, SAT Math scores were significantly positively correlated with DV1 (.303*) and ACT scores were significantly positively correlated with DV1 (.263*) and DV4 (.256*).
Comparisons between Criteria
  • Comparisons were made across a number of criteria. Work was collected from courses taught by both tenure-line faculty and part-time faculty; there was no significant different in scores on work collected from the two types of faculty. There was, however, a difference in scores between upper- and lower-division courses on all the dimensions scored for both divisions (DV2 and DV3 were only scored on upper-division work). For DV1, work from lower division courses scored higher and for DV4 work from upper division courses scored higher. Work was sampled from only one University Studies component so no comparisons regarding University Studies components could be made.