Creative Writing

BFA Course Descriptions

  • Note: for day & time information, please go to SeaNet and search for courses.
  • Visit catalogue.uncw.edu for catalogue course descriptions (choose current catalogue year from drop-down, then see link in left column for course descriptions).

Fall 2017

CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed. Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-009: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, BACON M
Text: Show & Tell (6th Ed.)
This course will be a wide ranging introduction to the field of Creative Writing, taking in poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. Topics we may cover in poetry include sound, imagery and sense, and the importance of the line; in creative non-fiction the relationship between narrative and essay, lived experience and reflection; in fiction the way the rudiments of character, conflict and action in scene come together to create satisfying stories. Regular class assignments in which students are encouraged to experiment and push their writing skills to new heights will contribute considerably to the final grade. Attendance and participation are graded, and all students are expected to be active class members.

CRW 201-010: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, HOBBS H
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-012: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, CANLE B
Text: Show & Tell (6th Ed.)
This course will be a contemporary introduction to the field of Creative Writing. While we will cover the three main genres of poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction, we will also look at some works which blend or bend the genres. All material covered will be from contemporary writers, giving students an idea of the literary realm as it currently stands, and how the evolution of language and technology have influenced literature. Coursework will include the regular submission of creative works which we will peer workshop throughout the semester. This is an attendance and participation based class. All students will be expected to attend and engage in every class.

CRW 201-013: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, FALESCHINI I
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed.Additional readings provided.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-014: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, KROUSE L
Anne Lamott said, “Good writing is about telling the truth. We are a species that needs and wants to understand who we are.” Ernest Hemingway put writing simply: “All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence you know.” This course will be a practice in exploring truth and understanding who we are, and, on the smaller scale, writing the truest sentences we know. Introduction to Creative Writing covers the genres of poetry, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Students will read published works, discuss and imitate assigned readings, and regularly submit creative exercises, workshop pieces, and critiques of peers’ work. All readings will be provided by the instructor.

CRW 201-015: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, SHEN C
In this course, students will learn the fundamental elements of fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction through reading and analyzing texts as well as producing their own work. Throughout the semester, students will participate in workshops and eventually produce a portfolio of their finished pieces. This class is focused on refining student’s writing skills and widening their understanding of the term “creative writing”.

CRW 201-016: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, BARBER K
Required text: Show & Tell 6th ed.
This course will introduce students to three creative writing genres: poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction. Students will read published works in each genre and be expected to discuss assigned readings. Each student will submit an original work for each genre to be workshopped by the class. Coursework will include weekly readings and responses, creative exercises, quizzes, workshop pieces, critiques of peers' work, and a final portfolio.

CRW 203: THE EVOLUTION OF CREATIVE WRITING, FURIA P
Historical survey of the development of creative writing in drama, poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Authors include Sophocles, Shakespeare, Milton, Austen, Dickinson, Hemingway

CRW 204-001: RESEARCH FOR CREATIVE WRITERS, CROWE M
What can we gain, as people and as creative writers, from looking beyond ourselves for subject matter? Do we have a responsibility to do so? What liberties can we take when imagining and representing experience, especially the experience of others? When we write from research, how can do more than churn out expository reports? In this course, students will explore these questions and many more through the reading of poems, short stories, and essays, and through the writing of research-inspired texts. They will also discover, discuss, evaluate, and practice multiple methods of gathering information, gaining confidence and expertise in specific subject areas, and generally finding and using sources to enrich, enliven, deepen, and concretize their creative work.

CRW 207-001: FICTION WRITING I, BARBER K
Required text: The Art and Craft of Fiction: A Writer's Guide, Michael Kardos
Students will read published works by contemporary writers, as well as read and discuss the work of their peers in a workshop setting. Over the course of the semester, we will explore the critical elements of successful fiction writing and how we can apply them to our own work. Students will be expected to produce weekly writing exercises and scenes, complete reading quizzes, and finish two full-length pieces of fiction, with a final portfolio serving as the final exam.

CRW 207-002: FICTION WRITING I, FALESCHINI I
Text: Janet Burroway A Guide To Writing Narrative Craft (8th edition). Scott McCloud understanding Comics: The Invisible Art. Additional readings provided.
In this course students will closely examine and discuss both published contemporary short fiction and the writing of their peers. Lectures will cover elements of fictional craft and creativity as a process. Students will complete weekly writing exercises, reading quizzes, and two full-length short stories, one of which they will revise. By the end of the semester, students will have a firmer grasp of how fiction works in general, and a deeper insight into their own process.

CRW 208-001: POETRY WRITING, CANLE B
This course will be an introduction into the writing and reading of poetry. We will be exploring contemporary poetry in a variety of forms, some less "traditional" than others, learning new ways in which poetry can be composed. Visual, surreal, spoken word, translation, found and erasure, collaboration, lyric essay/prose poetry, cinepoetry, comics, experimental-- we will be looking at this art form from around it's (infinite) boarders. This class will require student participation and attendance, as well as an analytical paper and final revised portfolio.

CRW 209-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION, WILLIS D
Texts: The Best Creative Nonfiction, Vol. 1, edited by Lee Gutkind
Creative Nonfiction is a young and exciting genre. It challenges its writers and readers to find meaning in the world without embellishing. In this introductory course, we will explore what it means to tell true stories in creative ways. We will borrow techniques from some of the genre's fundamental texts to write some creative nonfiction of our own. Coursework will include weekly readings; assignments in a variety of styles including personal essay/memoir, narrative journalism and experimental forms; and student-led workshops.

CRW 209-002: CREATIVE NONFICTION I, KROUSE L
William Zinsser once wrote, “Memoir isn’t the summary of a life; it’s a window into a life, very much like a photograph in its selective composition. It may look like a casual and even random calling up of bygone events. It’s not; it’s a deliberate construction.” Sometimes people ask, “How can nonfiction be creative?” It’s choosing the window to tell the truth through that makes creative nonfiction a creative practice. Of course, creative nonfiction is more than memoir. It’s essays, journalism, and journaling. It’s documentary, podcasts, blogs, memoir-comics, biographies, etc. Creative nonfiction can be literary, lyrical, philosophical, political, religious, or scientific. In this class, we’ll explore nonfiction in its various forms and learn to tell, read, and listen to true stories well told.
Required texts: The Art of Memoir, Mary Karr. This is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life, David Foster Wallace. Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic, Alison Bechdel. Between the World and Me, Ta-Nehisi Coates.

CRW 305-001: THE CREATIVE PROCESS, GASKILL M
Prerequisite or corequisite: CRW 206, 207, 208 or 209 or consent of instructor. Investigation through reading, lectures, discussions, writing, and exercises of the creative process in general and its particular application to literary art. Readings include studies of the creative process in a variety of other disciplines.

CRW 306-001: FORMS OF FICTION, SIEGEL R
This course is an exploration of the major forms of literary fiction: the short story; the linked short-story collection; the novella; and the novel. We will read, write about and discuss examples of these forms with an eye to issues of craft, looking at how they are put together and how they work. The ultimate aim is to learn how to read like a writer.

CRW 307-001: FICTION WRITING II, DE GRAMONT M 
In this class, students will work on developing craft through in-class and at-home writing exercises.  These exercises should progress toward a completed piece of fiction, either a short story or a chapter of a longer work.  Each student will have a workshop for his or her completed first draft.  Prior to this workshop, each student will have two shorter workshops of a first page.  Students will read, listen to, and discuss each other’s work, as well as handing in written critiques.  

CRW 308-001: POETRY WRITING, WHITE M
This is the intermediate level poetry writing workshop for any creative writer. In this class, we will focus on reading contemporary poetry and writing poetry exercises, journals, and other assignments. We will spend most of our time workshopping these assignments, which you’ll later revise for inclusion in a final portfolio, upon which 50% of your final grade will be based. We will especially focus our discussions on imagery, metaphor, and the line. We’ll explore free verse, received forms, and the prose poem.

CRW 309-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION II, HOLMAN V
“On Great and Little Things”
The first half of the semester, this course will combine weekly instructor-provided readings, in-depth writing exercises, and field work. The second half of the course will focus on writing, workshopping, and revising an extended familiar essay; in other words, an essay that is both about the author and about a particular subject. We’ll start off by reading Anne Fadiman’s collection At Large and At Small. The primary goal is learning to create a complex, compelling narrative that is both emotionally and intellectually engaging. By the end of the semester, students will have a portfolio of polished short essays, a long familiar essay, and a deep revision.

CRW 316-001: PLAYWRITING I, CASTAGNO P
(THR 316 ) Prerequisite: CRW 207 , CRW 208  or CRW 209  or consent of instructor. Analysis of one-act plays and their construction; the writing of an original one-act play required.  

CRW 318-001: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION
(FST 318) Prerequisite: PCRW, PFST, CRW, or FST major; and CRW 207, CRW 208, CRW 209, or FST 201 or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenplays and/or documentary scripts for television and film with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 320-001: WRITERS’ WEEK FALL 2017
This two-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers’ Week. The week will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with MFA program students or alumni. Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week. As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 15 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 321-001, 002: INTRODUCTION TO BOOK PUBLISHING, SMITH E
An introduction to the culture and commerce of books, this course examines the life cycle of a book; the people and processes involved in book publishing; and the art, history, business, economics, and ethics of the publishing industry. The class will be broken into formal lectures, given by the professor and invited industry professionals, each Tuesday morning, and smaller, discussion-based sections on Thursdays. Readings, research assignments, and a book auction will help students discover how publishing decisions are made. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-001: BOOKBUILDING, DAVIS M
This course offers hands-on training in the basics of effective graphic design and typography for book publishing. Students will become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite—InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator—while completing a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work. The course also incorporates a survey history of publishing, with a focus on current trends and the future of the book. Students should be prepared for a rigorous, fast-paced course that requires lab work outside of class hours. [Note: Bookbuilding counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 324-001: WRITING AS AN EDITOR, CROWE M
While much of an editor’s job focuses on helping other writers craft their work, editors of literary periodicals and presses must frequently produce clear, convincing, even beautiful prose of their own. Editors write in many forms and with a wide variety of aims: to communicate their editorial vision to contributors or readers, to evaluate and/or recommend others’ writing, to sell subscriptions, to advocate for writers and act as literary citizens. With a heavy emphasis on real-world models, this course offers students the opportunity to practice the kinds of writing (letters from the editor, calls for submissions, reviews, and interviews, etc.) editors must do in the course of their work.

CRW 325-001: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL (3 credit hours), GERARD P
T 3:30-6:15 PM KE 2112
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects, including social media. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Optional: Participation in  Chautauqua On the Air, a broadcast edition of the journal.  Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 420-002: LYRIC ESSAYS, PROSE POETRY, FLASH FICTION, COX M
A craft workshop focusing on a study of the margins of narrative.  Student poets critique and encourage each other's work, emphasizing experimentation.   Journal consists of responses to reading assignments in modern and contemporary literature, as well as weekly reflections and process exercises. Students will choose a writer to study in depth.

CRW 496-001: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, LEE R
Students in this course will workshop, write continually in and out of class, produce a portfolio by the end of the semester, give a public reading, contribute to an anthology published in the pub lab upstairs, and read many examples of poetry, essays and short stories.

CRW 496-002: SENIOR SEMINAR IN POETRY, MÖRLING M
In this class we will ask and address questions such as: What does it mean to be a poet in the world today and what is the poet’s responsibilities and how do we even prepare for such a vocation? We will study the notion of inspiration through the great Spanish poet Federico Garcia Lorca’s Theory of the Duende as well as engage in an on going discussion about the process of writing. We will read and workshop poems and work together to assemble a cohesive BFA thesis to which each student will write a critical preface. We will discuss professional issues such as applying to graduate school, working regular jobs and teaching and publishing. We will familiarize ourselves with the world of literary magazines and submit our poems for publication. We will also collaborate and develop together with students in The Publishing Laboratory, a class poetry anthology. At the end of the semester all students will give a public reading of their own work.


 

 

BFA Course Descriptions Archive