BFA Course Descriptions

*Note: for day & time information, please go to SeaNet and search for courses.
Click here for the 2014–15 undergraduate catalogue course descriptions.


Fall 2014


CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 203: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, FURIA P
Students will study the major forms of creative writing--poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction--by writers such as Sophocles, Shakespeare, Austen, Twain, Dickinson, and Hemingway.There will be a combination of lectures and small, discussion-workshop sections. Writing assignments will include both creative and analytical exercises designed to heighten student appreciation of artistic achievement in various forms. There will also be a final examination over all the reading in the course.

CRW 207-001: FICTION WRITING, KUSNIC P
What makes great fiction great? Deferring to great works of literature from the 20th and 21st centuries, this class will attempt to answer that question, and others, as students learn the basic tools of narrative and how to employ them in their own work. In CRW 207, students will share and critique each other’s work sporadically throughout the semester, though much time will be spent discussing readings and the elements of craft in addition to doing in-class writing exercises. Examining an eclectic array of voices, from Virginia Woolf and William Faulkner to Zadie Smith and Jonathan Franzen, students will begin cultivating their own literary voices—figuring out not only what it is they have to say in their fiction, but also how to say it.

CRW 207-002: FICTION WRITING, APFELD B
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Wiliford and Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott.
In this course, students will explore the basic elements of short story writing, by both reading widely from published works, and also by writing and revising their own stories.  We will discuss various technical aspects of fiction—such as description, dialogue, or character—as well as the more intangible elements of stories: what draws us to fiction? why do we write it? what does fiction mean for us today?  Coursework will include close reading of assigned stories and essays, and short written exercises.  Students will also write a longer story that will be workshopped, revised, and submitted as part of a final portfolio.  As a discussion-based class, students are expected to be engaged participants, active listeners, and to attend class regularly.

CRW 207-003: FICTION WRITING, SIEGRIST T
Texts:The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone);Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Lifeby Anne Lamott.
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of short fiction by reading assigned texts and writing their own stories. Students turn in regular creative exercises, culminating in full-length short stories. Class participation and attendance are essential to ensure a quality workshop experience. Imagination is also required.

CRW 208-001: POETRY WRITING, BRADFORD J
Texts: Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry ed. Rita Dove, The Art of Recklessness by Dean Young
This course will serve as an introduction to reading and writing poetry. We will read contemporary poets, and discuss the ways in which metaphor, imagery, and sound create tiny worlds for us to live inside, even if only for a moment. You will also write your own poems, which we will also discuss with an eye toward revision. The class will culminate in a final portfolio of revised poems.

CRW 208-002: POETRY WRITING, JONES L
Texts:The Penguin Anthology of Twenty-First Century American Poetry,edited by Rita Dove;Letters to a Young Poet,byRainer Maria Rilke, M.D. Herter Norton; Craft book TBA
Anne Carson notes, “"Prose is a house, poetry a man in flames running quite fast through it.”In this intro to poetry class, we will focus onrelating to poetryin anacademic and creative context. Through focused reading, reading responses, in-class writing, and workshops, we will explore what it is to write poetry today. As thiscourseis discussion-oriented, consistent attendance isrequired: come to class, bring your words.

CRW 209-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION, RAMOS M
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction Vol. 1 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What is creative nonfiction? What's the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Why do people read creative nonfiction at all? Creative nonfiction writers share their personal truth in the context of fact, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism, and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively, learn to identify our own stories, and find engaging, unique ways to tell them. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop.

CRW 209-002: CREATIVE NONFICTION, PALMER A
Some writers have called it “the art of truth”; others, a genre of “true stories well told.”  But what *is* creative nonfiction? This introductory, discussion-based course will familiarize students with creative nonfiction both practically and conceptually.  Together, we will learn what distinguishes creative nonfiction as a genre and develop our skills as nonfiction writers by completing a variety of writing and reading assignments that inform these objectives. Coursework will focus on personal essay, memoir, and literary journalism, but will include writing exercises and assignments in other forms as well (e.g., science writing and travel writing). We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s creative work via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 304-001: FORMS OF DRAMATIC WRITING, FURIA P
Historical study of representative plays in western theatre that illustrate the development of such elements of playwriting as using the stage, making exposition dramatic, and scene structure. Typical authors include Sophocles, Shakespeare, Sheridan, Wilde, Shaw, Miller, and Glaspell.

CRW 305-001: THE CREATIVE PROCESS, GASKILL M
Prerequisite or corequisite: CRW 206, 207, 208 or 209 or consent of instructor.
Investigation through reading, lectures, discussions, writing, and exercises of the creative process in general and its particular application to literary art. Readings include studies of the creative process in a variety of other disciplines.

CRW 306-001: FORMS OF FICTION, SIEGEL R
This course is an exploration of the major forms of literary fiction: the short story; the linked short-story collection; the novella; and the novel. We will read, write about and discuss examples of these forms with an eye to issues of craft, looking at how they are put together and how they work. The ultimate aim is to learn how to read like a writer.

CRW 307-001: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, CHAI M
Texts: Best American Short Stories 2012, edited by Tom Perrotta, as well as supplementary texts as handouts or pdfs.
In this class students will have the opportunity to practice various elements of craft in the tradition of literary fiction.  Each week students will read assigned short stories, excerpts from novels, and other prose pieces for discussion of craft and aesthetic choices. Students will respond with their own creative pieces and receive feedback from the class, which they will use for revision. In addition to their original creative work and feedback for classmates, on occasion students may be asked to write a page or two of reflection on how readings, exercises, and discussions have affected their writing process.

CRW 307-002: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, DE GRAMONT
In this class, students will work on developing craft through in-class and at-home writing exercises.  These exercises should progress toward a completed piece of fiction, either a short story or a chapter of a longer work.  Each student will have a workshop for his or her completed first draft.  Prior to this workshop, each student will have two shorter workshops of a first page.  Students will read, listen to, and discuss each other’s work, as well as handing in written critiques.

CRW 315-001: WOMEN POETS AND THE PULITZER PRIZE, ADAMS L
We will examine the work of numerous celebrated poets, beginning with selected readings by early winners of this prestigious prize, and culminating with the more recent full-length collections. Texts will include the following: Mueller, Alive Together; Sexton, Live or Die; Kumin, Up Country; Oliver, American Primitive; Kizer, Yin; Dove, Thomas & Beulah; Glück, The Wild Iris; Emerson, Late Wife; Trethewey, Native Guard; Smith, Life on Mars; Olds, Stag’s Leap. Grade will include two analytical essays (midterm and final), as well as oral presentations.

CRW 318-001: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, LINEHAN T
(FST 318) Prerequisite: PCRW, PFST, CRW, orFSTmajor; andCRW 207,CRW 208,CRW 209, orFST201or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenplays and/or documentary scripts for television and film with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use inFST495.

CRW 318-002: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, HACKLER C
(FST 318) Prerequisite or corequisite: FST 201; or prerequisite: PCRW, CRW and CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209; or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenwriting with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 318-003: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, BUTTINO L
(FST 318) Prerequisite or corequisite: FST 201; or prerequisite: PCRW, CRW and CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209; or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenwriting with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 320-001: WRITERS’ WEEK FALL 2014, GESSNER D
This two-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers’ Week. The week will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with MFA program students or alumni.  Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week.  As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 15 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 320-002: HOW TO BE A STORY TELLING HIPSTER--PERFORMANCE IN CREATIVE WRITING, MORLING M
How do you tell a story or read a poem in such a way that it casts a spell?
How do you rid yourself of all preconceived and self-conscious notions of your craft and in the moment of creation allow yourself to purely follow your imagination? In this class we will record our dreams, study the automatic writers of French Surrealism, The San Francisco Renaissance and The Beat Movement. The final project will be a public class performance. The course is open to writers in all genres.

CRW 320-004: POETRY OF PLACE, ADAMS L
We will be reading three poetry collections in which place plays a significant role: Bad River Road, by Nebra Nystrom; Floating City, be Anne Pierson Wiese, and The Whole Field Still Moving Inside It, by Molly Bashaw. As we discuss these collections, we will consider the role of place, how the narrator interacts with locale, how environment imprints and shapes the psyche of those who inhabit any particular space. The remainder of the semester will be focused on workshopping student work with the goal of creating a cohesive collection of work. Grades include responses to collections, oral presentations, and a portfolio which will include revised poems and a critical/analytical introduction.

CRW 320-005: SPECIAL WORKSHOP IN CREATIVE NONFICTION, HOLMAN V
This dynamic class will focus on the wide variety of writing that is considered creative nonfiction. The first half of the semester we will read and analyze a short work of creative nonfiction each week. In addition, student will complete exercises designed to help generate new ideas. The second half of the semester we will workshop student work. We have three major goals in this class: to improve and expand your reading repertoire of published creative nonfiction, to build a common critical vocabulary with which to better analyze and discuss creative nonfiction, and to refine your writing skills. Active in-class participation (both spoken and written) is expected and essential for a good grade.
The instructor will provide the class with handouts.
CNF majors: this elective can be used to fulfill the requirement for 309 or 409.

CRW 321-001, 002: BOOKS & PUBLISHING, SMITH E
An introduction to the culture and commerce of books, this course examines the life cycle of a book; the people and processes involved in book publishing;and the history, business, economics, and ethics of the publishing industry. The class will be broken into formal lectures, given by the professor and invited industry professionals, each Tuesday morning, and smaller, discussion-basedsectionson Thursdays. Readings, research assignments, and a book auction will help students discover how publishing decisions are made. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.

CRW 322-001: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T
Required texts: The New Well-Tempered Sentence, by Karen Elizabeth Gordon, and Polishing Your Prose, by Steven M. and Victor L. Cahn. [Recommended but not required: On Writing Well, by William Zinsser.] CRW and PCRW majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209. This course will focus on editing students’ own creative writing for precision and clarity. We will emphasize developing and applying skills in self-editing for grammar, mechanics, spelling, manuscript formatting, style, and other fundamentals crucial to effective, polished writing in the creative writing profession. Students will complete exercises and write/edit work using a series of prompts and assignments. Exams and homework will make up the grade, along with a brief presentation. An attendance policy will be enforced. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-001: BOOKBUILDING, PRINCE K
Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, 209, or consent of instructor. This course offers hands-on training in the basics of effective graphic design and typography for book publishing. Students will become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite—InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator—while completing a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work. The course also incorporates a survey history of printing, with a focus on current trends and the future of the book. Students should be prepared for a rigorous, fast-paced course that requires work in the Publishing Laboratory outside of class hours. [Note: counts toward the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 324-001: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL, GERARD P
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions,work on a developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 324-001: COPYEDITING, PHILLIPS A
This course provides a thorough introduction to the art and craft of copyediting, a skill useful on the job market as well as in substantive editing of both others’ and one’s own work. We will focus on editing for magazine and book publishers—and will thus spend a good deal of time with the Chicago Manual of Style—but we will also consider other settings for copyediting. In addition to marking copy by hand and on screen, we will explore how to create and maintain collegial relationships throughout the editing process, with the goal of improving proficiency in what Carol Fisher Saller calls “working through the writer for the reader.” We will consider levels of editing; freelance and in-house editorial processes; making and using style sheets; effective use of style guides; and the finer points of grammar and usage. Students will be evaluated via quizzes (including editing tests similar to those given by publishers), editing projects, and a final portfolio. Texts: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition; The Copyeditor’s Handbook, 3rd edition, by Amy Einsohn; the AP Stylebook, 2014 edition; The Subversive Copyeditor, by Carol Fisher Saller.

CRW 407-001: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING, DE GRAMONT N
In this class, students will work on craft through close reading of each other’s fiction in a workshop format.  Students will write two new and original pieces for workshop and revise one of these pieces substantially.  Reading assignments will be based on issues that arise during workshops.

CRW 408-001: ADVANCED POETRY WRITING, COX M
A craft workshop.  Student poets critique and encourage each other's work, emphasizingextensive revision.  We'll focus on the structural aspects of lyric and narrative poetry. Journal consists of responses to extensive reading assignments in modern and contemporary poetry and poetics, as well as numerous process exercises.  Individualized reading lists and handouts on Blackboard.

CRW 418-001: SCREENWRITING II: WRITING THE FEATURE FILM, HACKLER F
(FST 418) Prerequisites: FST 318 (CRW 318) or consent of instructor. The craft of screenwriting applied to the feature form.Students plan a feature-length screenplay, and write, workshop, and complete the first act.

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, STAPLES B
Students must have been admitted to the certificate program in order to receive permission to enroll in the publishing practicum. Prerequisite: CRW 321, 322, 323.
A select group of students support the work of the Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, and producing books and other publications. Undergraduate practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 1.5 hour staff meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 or 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student’s convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit.

CRW 496-001: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING (FICTION AND CREATIVE NONFICTION) HOLMAN, V
The Senior Seminar is the capstone course in our BFA program. We have several goals: selection and preparation of your thesis material, creation of your critical preface, and collaboration with the Publishing Laboratory students to create an anthology of student prose. We will also organize your public reading at the end of the semester. In addition, we'll discuss topics such graduate school, publication, and employment. Students should enter the class with a three to five page selection of prose suitable for the anthology.

CRW 496-002: SENIOR SEMINAR IN POETRY, COX M
The senior seminar is a capstone course for graduating BFA majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 408. You will consolidate and polish a selection of your poetry from previous workshops into a manuscript, write a critical preface, then read from that manuscript in a public presentation.   You will also collaborate with Publishing Laboratory students to create an anthology that incorporates poems from your manuscript.  To this latter end, you must be prepared to immediately provide five poems from which to choose anthology content. Relevant issues of the profession (publication, graduate school, etc.) will be discussed as we go.


Spring 2014


CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 203-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, DOTSEY J
Texts: The Round House by Louise Erdrich; Antigone by Sophocles; Pulphead by John Jeremiah Sullivan; poetry TBD.
How do characters within a novel differ from those written for the stage? What can poets do that nonfiction writers can’t? In this reading-intensive course we will study poetry, fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction to understand the choices and limitations inherent within each genre. This class will require in-class discussion as well as analytical and creative writing. This is not a workshop class, however, so students should be prepared to read closely with an eye toward understanding form more than anything else. There will be a final exam.

CRW 203-002: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, HENNESSEY C
Writers often explore dystopias as a way to raise real-world issues regarding society, environment, politics, religion, psychology, spirituality, or technology. In this class, we will study the major forms of creative writing – poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction – by writers who explore the ways in which society can, will, or might fracture. Readings will include works by T.S. Eliot, Sophocles, Kurt Vonnegut, Margaret Atwood, John Jeremiah Sullivan, and Jo Ann Beard. This is a discussion-based class with both creative and analytical written assignments, as well as a final examination over all the reading in the course.

CRW 203-003: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, SKLAR E
Texts: A Visit From The Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde, Bring The Noise: The Best Pop Culture Essays from Barrelhouse Magazine, poetry TBD
How do characters within a novel differ from those written for the stage? What can poets do that nonfiction writers can’t? In this reading-intensive course we will study poetry, fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction to understand the choices and limitations inherent within each genre. This class will require in-class discussion as well as analytical and creative writing. This is not a workshop class, so students should be prepared to read closely with an eye toward understanding form more than producing their own creative work. There will be a final exam.

CRW 203-004: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, MORRIS J
Texts: Fiction: A Visit From the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan; Creative Nonfiction: Another Bullshit Night In Suck City by Nick Flynn; Drama: ‘Art’ by Yasmina Reza and translated by Christopher Hampton; Poetry: Tell Me by Kim Addonizio. In this class, you will study short stories, novels, essays, poems, and plays to deepen your understanding of the writer’s craft and technique. You will learn to read as a writer, attending to aspects of form such as image in poetry, plot in drama, point of view in fiction, and narrative voice in creative nonfiction. You will learn to read literature in a new way, just as a student who has taken a course in film studies learns to view films in a new way—attending to camera angles, lighting, and editing. You will write essays analyzing the work, as well as several short creative assignments in each genre.

CRW 204-001 RESEARCH FOR CREATIVE WRITERS, GERARD P
Research is a creative process in its own right that not only helps authenticate a piece of writing but also can yield new possibilities for projects in all genres. We'll explore basic tools of research, including the art of the interview, locating and using print archives, travel-based fieldwork, electronic and digital resources, and other methods, in the context of examples of how other writers have met the challenges of research. Then we will apply these to original creative work in the student's chosen genre. Our focus will be both practical and aesthetic. Students should expect assignments that take them beyond the classroom to conduct their own original research toward a final project that incorporates that research-- in poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction.

CRW 207-001: FICTION WRITING, SIEGRIST T
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott.
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of short fiction by reading assigned texts and writing their own stories. Students turn in regular creative exercises, culminating in full-length short stories. Class participation and attendance are essential to ensure a quality workshop experience. Imagination is also required.

CRW 207-002: FICTION WRITING, HENNESSEY C
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone); Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott.
In this course, students will learn the essential elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work with the help of their peers. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively, enthusiastically, and thoughtfully, and regular attendance is a must.

CRW 207-003: FICTION WRITING, DOTSEY J
Texts: The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction, 2nd ed. (edited by Lex Wiliford and Michael Martone); The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers by John Gardner.
In this course, students will learn the introductory elements of short story writing, first by reading and analyzing contemporary fiction, then by writing and revising their own work. Assignments will include close reading of assigned stories, short written exercises, and a longer story that will go through the workshop process. This is a discussion-based class with a workshop element, so students are expected to participate actively and thoughtfully; regular attendance is crucial.

CRW 208-001:INTRODUCTION TO POETRY WRITING,MORRIS J
Texts:The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry, J.D. McClatchy; The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry, Ilya Kaminsky, Susan Harris; Ordinary Genius, Kim Addonizio; Letters to a Young Poet, Rainer Maria Rilke, M.D. Herter Norton.
In this introductory course we will explore the craft of poetry. Emily Dickinson said,
“If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.” As a class, we will approach poetry as a group of writers and readers in search of the same feeling that Dickinson speaks of. Students will be required to complete assigned reading, in-class writing exercises, writing of their own poetry, a final portfolio, and active participation in classroom discussion.

CRW 208-002: POETRY WRITING, JONES L
Texts: The Penguin Anthology of Twenty-First Century American Poetry, edited by Rita Dove; Ordinary Genius, by Kim Addonizio; Letters to a Young Poet, by Rainer Maria Rilke, M.D. Herter Norton.
Anne Carson notes, “"Prose is a house, poetry a man in flames running quite fast through it.” In this intro to poetry class, we will focus on relating to poetry in an academic and creative context. Through focused reading, reading responses, in-class writing, and workshops, we will explore what it is to write poetry today. As this course is discussion-oriented, consistent attendance is required: come to class, bring your words.

CRW 209-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION, VAUGHAN C
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction Vol. 1 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What is the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Creative nonfiction writers put the truth into context in a way that is unique to them, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively to identify our own stories and to learn to tell them in a way that intrigues others. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 209-002: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE NONFICTION, SKLAR E
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction, Vol. 2 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What's the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Creative nonfiction writers share their personal truth in the context of fact, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism, and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively, learn to identify our own stories, and find engaging, unique ways to tell them. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s essays via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 302-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, MESSER S
‘Just think what it would mean,’ Ferenczi wrote to Freud in 1910, ‘if one could tell everyone the truth...’” from Adam Phillips, Terrors and Experts
In 1998, concerning the popularity of memoir, Daphne Merkin wrote: "Ours is a culture addicted to exposure, to 'outing' ourselves and others." This course focuses on the history of narrative non-fiction, autobiography, the essay, the lyric essay, and memoir in America from pre-colonial era to the present.  We will explore ways in which the memoir genre has developed out of the personal essay, narrative broadsides, reportage and autobiography. William Zissner once described a memoir as “a window into a life…a portion of a larger autobiography.” Yet George Bernard Shaw wrote: "All autobiographies are lies … I do not mean unconscious, unintentional lies; I mean deliberate lies.”
Is it possible to write a truthful memoir or essay? Is it possible to report something exactly as it happened? How can we write about history? How has creative nonfiction developed and where is it headed? The course will examine different approaches to non-fiction over-time including early essays, slave and captivity narratives, and more non-traditional or experimental forms of memoir, narrative and objective reportage and the nonfiction novel – some conceptually and formally innovative. We will also look at controversy in the genre both past and present. The goal of the class is to give students a sense of the history (and possibilities) of ever-changing nonfiction writing.
Texts include: Lost Origins of the Essay (ed. John D’Agata); The Next American Essay, (ed. John D’Agata); Lifespan of a Fact, John D’Agata; Another Bullshit Night in Suck City, Nick Flynn; In Cold Blood, Truman Capote;  Pulphead, John Sullivan; Bluetes by Maggie Nelson; Things That Are by Amy Leach; Behind the Beautiful Forevers, Katherine Boo; Wild, Cheryl Strayed.

CRW 303-001: FORMS OF POETRY, MÖRLING M
In this class we will consider forms and how they fit and inform the philosophical perspective of our poems. What choices do we make in crafting our poems? What is our process of selection? Are poems, like the bowls of the ancient Japanese potters, born? Or are they made? Emily Dickinson wrote: “Nature is a haunted house. Art--/a house that tries to be haunted.” How can our poems be as natural as possible, the form and the content inevitable to the point of near invisibility? The global designer Bruce Mau has said: “For most of us, design is invisible. Until it fails.” Is this what the 18th century Japanese poet Ryokan meant when he wrote: “Who says my poems are poems?/My poems are not poems,/ After you know my poems are not poems,/ Then we can begin to discuss poetry.”

CRW 306-001: FORMS OF FICTION, BOYAJIAN M
This course will focus on the exploration of fictional elements (the creative possibilities) in the novel. While it is primarily a reading and discussion class (not a workshop) our goal is to read these novels like writers – to zero in on authorial choices in structure, characterization, scene, setting, dialogue, imagery, POV, etc. in an effort to further our own sensibilities and possibilities as writers.

CRW 307-001,-002: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, WATSON L
Restricted to CRW majors.
Donald Barthelme said, “The aim of literature ... is the creation of a strange object covered with fur which breaks your heart.” In this course we will break hearts with our writing. You will build on the fiction writing skills you’ve already learned, and in addition, you will learn to read like a writer. You will learn your strengths as writer, and via class discussion and the process of revision, you will learn how to improve your own writing, kill all your darlings, make your work  break hearts, etc. This is a workshop based course in which we will analyze and discuss up to three pieces of your own writing, as well as discuss short fiction that will be handed out in class.

CRW 308-001: INTERMEDIATE POETRY WORKSHOP, ADAMS L
Pre-requisite—CRW 208. This course is intended for poets who have acquired a basic knowledge of the craft and who now wish to hone their skills. The majority of class time will be spent workshopping student work, but we will also read and discuss two collections of contemporary poetry (Natasha Trethewey’s, Thrall and Gail Marin’s Begin Empty-Handed).  Requirements include formal responses to these collections, an analysis of four poems of your choice from the anthology The Best American Poetry 2013, and written responses to the work of peers. Final portfolio of workshopped poems, revised.

CRW 315-001: TRANSLATION, MÖRLING M
Octavio Paz said: “Translation is an art of analogy, the art of finding correspondences. An art of shadows and echoes…” Charles Baudelaire said that poetry is essentially analogy. The idea of universal correspondence comes from the idea that language is a micro cosmos, a double of the universe. Between the language of the universe and the universe of language, there is a bridge, a link: poetry. The poet, says Baudelaire, is the translator.”
In this class we will read and compare multiple translations of single poems and passages of prose in order to examine the choices and strategies of literary translation. In addition, each student in the class will also provide weekly contributions of his or her own translations. These translations will serve as focal points for the larger subject of translation, that of the writer as translator. Readings will include selections of translations from Swedish, German, French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Russian, Hebrew, Spanish and Portuguese. Knowledge of a second language is welcome but not at all necessary.

CRW 316-001: PLAYWRITING
(THR 316) Prerequisite: CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209 or consent of instructor. Analysis of one-act plays and their construction; the writing of an original one-act play required.

CRW 318-001,-002,-003: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING
(FST 318) Prerequisite or corequisite: FST 201; or prerequisite: PCRW, CRW and CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209; or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenwriting an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 320-001: THE ADVENTURE NARRATIVE, HOLMAN V
This course will take students far beyond the classroom. Our first adventure will be a weekend trip (two nights) to Lake Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge. In winter, the lake is home to over 100,000 waterbirds. We'll explore the area with the Refuge Director and his staff. Our second adventure will be a daytime trip on the Black River to view a pristine cypress swamp that is home to the oldest known living trees east of the Rockies. Students will have the opportunity to observe and explore, interview experts and locals, and take notes while in the field. Students will use the material gathered on these trips to craft two compelling nonfiction stories.
Students may expect to read articles and essays by Annie Dillard, Sebastien Junger, Mark Twain, John Branch, and others. We'll also read two book-length narratives: Into The Wild (Jon Krakauer) and Wild (Cheryl Strayed). In addition, several experts in coastal ecology and wildlife will meet with our class prior to our trips.
A spirit of adventure (and attendance on both trips) is mandatory. (Trip one departs the afternoon of Friday Jan 31 and returns Sunday Feb 2. Trip two departs the morning of 6 April and returns late that afternoon.)

CRW 322-001: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T
Required texts: The New Well-Tempered Sentence, by Karen Elizabeth Gordon, and Polishing Your Prose, by Steven M. and Victor L. Cahn. [Recommended but not required: On Writing Well, by William Zinsser.] CRW and PCRW majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209. This course will focus on editing students’ own creative writing for precision and clarity. We will emphasize developing and applying skills in self-editing for grammar, mechanics, spelling, manuscript formatting, style, and other fundamentals crucial to effective, polished writing in the creative writing profession. Students will complete exercises and write/edit work using a series of prompts and assignments. Exams and homework will make up the grade. Class participation is a must. An attendance policy will be enforced. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-001: BOOKBUILDING, JONES K
Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, 209, or consent of instructor. This course offers hands-on training in the basics of effective graphic design and typography for book publishing. Students will become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite—InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator—while completing a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work. The course also incorporates a survey history of publishing, with a focus on current trends and the future of the book. Students should be prepared for a rigorous, fast-paced course that requires lab work outside of class hours. [Note: Bookbuilding counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-002: BOOKBUILDING, STAPLES B
Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, 209, or consent of instructor. This course offers hands-on training in the basics of effective graphic design and typography for book publishing. Students will become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite—InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator—while completing a progressively complex series of projects, culminating in a finished chapbook of their own work. The course also incorporates a survey history of publishing, with a focus on current trends and the future of the book. Students should be prepared for a rigorous, fast-paced course that requires lab work outside of class hours. [Note: Bookbuilding counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 324-001: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL, WILSON H
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions,work on a developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 407-001: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING, BOYAJIAN M
We will begin the semester by studying published fiction and discussing the elements of craft to identify the individual needs of every student in this class – all the way from interests/inspiration to the process of revising with publication as the final goal. We will read and brainstorm, write short pieces, experiment and explore, and we will hone our strengths and also zero in on the elements of fiction that just don’t make it onto the page as organically as we’d like – those hurdles we stumble over or avoid altogether that are actually opportunities lying in wait.

CRW 408-001: ADVANCED POETRY WRITING, COX M
A craft workshop.  Student poets critique and encourage each other's work, emphasizing extensive revision.  We'll focus on the structural aspects of lyric and narrative poetry. Journal consists of responses to extensive reading assignments in modern and contemporary poetry and poetics, as well as numerous process exercises.  Individualized reading lists and handouts on Blackboard.

CRW 419-001: SCREENWRITING III: FILM ADAPTATION
(FST 419) Prerequisite: FST 318 (CRW 318) or consent of instructor. Writing, revision, and completion of screen adaptation of literary work.

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, STAPLES B
Students must have been admitted to the certificate program in order to receive permission to enroll in the publishing practicum. Prerequisite: CRW 321, 322, 323
A select group of students support the work of The Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, and producing books and other publications. Undergraduate practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 1.5 hour staff meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 or 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student’s convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit.

CRW 460-002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT, SMITH E
[Prerequisites: Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program and must have completed both CRW 323 and 460-001. Permission of instructor is required.]
Want to gain experience working for a small press? A select group of undergraduate students help with the daily work of the department’s literary imprint, Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions as an internship and provides hands-on experience in our daily operations. Interns can expect to assist with the writing of press releases and other promotional materials; research sales and marketing leads; mail review copies, press releases, and other promotional materials; update our database of review outlets and bookstores; design, produce, and mail publicity kits; assist with maintenance of our Web site and social media outlets; and attend weekly staff meetings. Lookout practicum students work 8 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 2-hour meeting), under faculty supervision. Participants are selected by permission of instructor on the basis of excellent performance in previous publishing courses and demonstrated interest in the field. What students get out of the course—in advancement of their own understanding of the publishing enterprise, or in marketable skills to take with them—will be directly proportionate to their leadership, professionalism, and dedication. A brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 496-001: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, HOLMAN V
The Senior Seminar is the capstone course in our BFA program. We have several goals: selection and preparation of your thesis material, creation of your critical preface, and collaboration with the Publishing Laboratory students to create an anthology of student prose. We will also organize your public reading at the end of the semester. In addition, we'll discuss topics such graduate school, publication, and employment. Students should enter the class with a three to five page selection of prose suitable for the anthology.

CRW 496-002: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, BASS T
CRW majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 407, 408, or 409. 6 credit hours. This course, reserved for students in their final semester in the major, is the capstone learning experience for creative writing majors. The seminar will address issues of the profession in preparation for and beyond graduation. Each student will compile, polish, and submit a BFA thesis and give a public reading.The course also will include discussions of professional topics, such as publishing creative work, seeking employment after graduation, and applying to graduate school. Requirements include completing the senior thesis with a substantial critical preface, participating in the senior anthology in conjunction with The Publishing Laboratory, and giving a public reading of the student’s original creative work. [Note: The course is part of University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive.]

CRW 496-003: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, DE GRAMONT N
In this course students will compile, perfect, and submit their BFA theses, collaborate with other writers and our department’s Publishing Lab to create an anthology of BFA student work, and give a public reading of their own fiction. The class will also include discussion of professional issues such as submitting creative work for publication, careers in writing and publishing, and applying to graduate school.

CRW 498: UNDERGRADUATE INTERNSHIP IN CREATIVE WRITING
(1-6 hours of credit) Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 201, and nine additional hours of CRW writing courses, of which at least three are at the 300-400 level. Academic training and practical writing experience through work in a private company or public agency. Faculty supervision and evaluation of all study and on-site activity. Open to students of junior or senior standing in all majors who have been approved by the faculty internship advisor.


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