Fall 2015 Cornerstone Learning Communities

Please Note: While some of the experiential opportunities with each learning community will be mandatory, others may require both permission forms and a small fee. Those opting out of extracurricular activities that require additional fees or because of extenuating circumstances will be given alternative activities to meet the learning objectives

You will see some information in bold below some communities to let students know if a community is not an option due to possible AP or IB (higher level only acceptedb) exams or transfer credit. 

There are eight total Cornerstone Learning Communities to choose from. For more information about each Learning Community and the courses offered you may click on one of the following or scroll through the page.

Fall 2015 Learning Communities

  1. Bugles, Belles & Bullets: The Fact and Fiction of the American Civil War
  2. The Explorers: Cultural Anthropology and Global Citizenship
  3. Novels, Nudes & the Modern Subject
  4. People in Their Environment: An Examination of the Social and Environmental Dimensions of Inequality
  5. Scrubs & Scholars: Community Support in Navigating Your Path to Nursing School
  6. Stretching Your Mind
  7. Syntax & Salsa: Fusion of Composition & Dance
  8. What Makes Hansel & Gretel Tick? Examination through the Lenses of Psychology and Literature

1. Bugles, Belles & Bullets: The Fact and Fiction of the American Civil War

Courses:

Course
Title
Days
Time
Instructor
Hours
Course Description
ENG 290 Themes in Literature MW 3:30-4:45 PM Ms. Jane MacLennan 3 Aesthetic, Interpretive, & Literary
HST 105 American History to 1865 MW 2:00-3:15 PM Dr. Chris Fonvielle 3 Historical & Philosophical Approaches
UNI 101 First Year Seminar TR 4:00-5:15 PM Ms. Maggie Bannon 3 Foundations

Description

The deadliest war in American history is known by many, primarily Southern, names. Some of them are The Late Unpleasantness, The War of Northern Aggression, The Lost Cause, The Brothers' War," and "The War Against Slavery." Whatever the name, there is little doubt that the war fractured the United States and that the time period was rife with nationalism, inflammatory language and tales of suffering and hardship. Some of this fracture and hostility is in evidence almost 150 years later. The literature of and about this period reflects the history and the war's impact on both individuals and cultures. The short stories, poetry and drama in Eng 290 will often parallel the studies in HST 105 and since we live in a historically significant area, there will be field trips as well as study of pertinent original documents. From a historical standpoint, we will examine the causes of the Civil War as well as social, military and political aspects of the war itself and its aftermath.
*You cannot choose this as an option if you have taken (and scored a 4 or better) or plan to take the AP test for U.S. History.

2. The Explorers: Cultural Anthropology and Global Citizenship

Courses:

Course
Title
Days
Time
Instructor
Hours
Course Description
ANT 206 Cultural Anthropology TR 2:00-3:15 PM Dr. Barbara Michael 3 Living in a Global Society
ENG 290 Themes in Literature TR 12:30-1:45 PM Ms. Michelle Manning 3 Aesthetic, Interpretive, & Literary Perspectives
UNI 101 First Year Seminar MW 11 AM-12:15 PM Mr. Danny Hall 3 Foundations

Description

Using the classroom as a portal, students will investigate the diversity of different ethnicities, cultures, and societies and explore how societies create their own social, cultural, and political norms. This learning community will specifically focus on themes of coming of age, survival, social justice, displacement, crisis and other events that help to shape cultural and personal identity, perceptions, and adaptations, including adapting to college life. Through reading literature and texts, viewing documentaries, engaging in discussions, and participating in projects, students will also be challenged to enhance their understanding of their own cultures and identity, to confront their own cultural bias, and to consider their roles as global citizens. Students will participate in a low ropes challenge course, at least one field trip, and service learning projects.
*You cannot choose this as an option if you have taken (and scored a 5 or better) or plan to take the IB HL exam for Anthropology.

3. Novels, Nudes & the Modern Subject

Courses:

Course
Title
Days
Time
Instructor
Hours
Course Description
ARH 202 Renaissance through Early Modern Period TR 2:00-3:15 PM Dr. Kemille Moore 3 Aesthetic, Interpretive, & Literary Perspectives
ENG 226 World Literature since 1600 TR 3:30-4:45 PM Dr. Katherine Montweiler 3 Aesthetic, Interpretive, & Literary Perspectives
UNI 101 First Year Seminar MW 11 AM-12:15 PM Ms. Megan Hodgson 3 Foundations

Description

In these courses, we'll focus on five of the most fascinating centuries of art and literature, from the earliest days of the Renaissance up through the exciting era of early twentieth-century Expressionism. As feudal and agrarian systems slowly gave way to industrialism, urbanization and democracies, writers and artists wrestled with revolutions in science and philosophy while they considered man's position in the universe. Far from being escapes, art and literature provided intellectuals with platforms to express their thoughts, concerns, and phobias about the ever-changing world around them. As Europe spread her "Enlightenment" across the globe, writers began to question imperialism, the rights of men (and women), and slavery (the economic system the West depended on), as they discovered the humanity and the achievements of the peoples they encountered.

4. People in Their Environment: An Examination of the Social and Environmental Dimensions of Inequality

Courses:

Course
Title
Days
Time
Instructor
Hours
Course Description
EVS 195 Intro to Environmental Studies TR 11 AM-12:15 PM Mr. Damian Maddalena 3 Scientific Approaches to the Scientific World
SOC 215 Modern Social Problems TR 9:30-10:45 AM Dr. Julia Waity 3 Understanding Human Institutions & Behaviors
UNI 101 First Year Seminar TBA TBA TBA 3 Foundations

Description

Though we often see ourselves as separated from the natural world by built environments, we are intimately tied to the natural environment. Patterns of development, resources, conflict, and justice can be studied within the context of the natural world. In this learning community, students will examine current social and environmental problems on a local, regional, and global scale; using GIS analysis that incorporates methods from the natural and social sciences. Pairing sociology (SOC 215), environmental study (EVS 195) and basic GIS analysis connects sociological phenomenon to its location within natural and anthropogenic environments. Location helps reveal patterns and relations that bring a more complete understanding of causes, effects and interventions for social and environmental issues.
*You cannot choose this as an option if you have taken (and scored a 3 or better on the AP or a 5 or better on the IB HL) or plan to take the AP or IB HL exam for Environmental Science.

5. Scrubs & Scholars: Community Support in Navigating Your Path to Nursing School

Courses:

Course
Title
Days
Time
Instructor
Hours
Course Description
BIO 201 Principles of Biology: Cells TR 11 AM-12:15 PM Dr. Richard Satterlie 3 Scientific Approaches to the Natural World
  LAB R 5:00-7:50 PM   1 Scientific Approaches to the Natural World
SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology MW 2:00-3:15 PM Dr. Yunus Kaya 3 Understanding Human Institutions & Behaviors
UNI 101 First Year Seminar MW 3:30-4:45 PM Ms. Trisha Schleicher-Tinney 3 Foundations

Description

This learning community offers students the opportunity to begin their intensive study of the sciences as well as their personal preparation for a career in health care from the first moments of their college experience. This community is specifically designed for potential nursing students ONLY. Admission to nursing programs is highly competitive and includes having an outstanding academic profile as well as refined personal qualities and skills in the realms of communication, teamwork, social awareness, humanitarianism, and leadership. Members of this learning community will begin preparation for their desired professional paths immediately by building their foundational scientific understanding, participating in the UNCW and Wilmington communities, and growing their individual skills through self-reflection, critical thinking, and investigation of career opportunities. For this learning community, students will be in regular, larger sized BIO and SOC lectures but their CHM lab and their UNI 101 course will only have their learning community classmates in them. The BIO and SOC courses will be taught in the regular academic buildings and the seminar course will be taught in Cornerstone.
*You cannot choose this as an option if you have taken (and scored a 4 or better on AP ) or plan to take the AP exam for Biology or are transferring in credit for a General Biology college course with a lab or an Introductory Sociology course.

6. Stretching Your Mind

Courses:

Course
Title
Days
Time
Instructor
Hours
Course Description
PED 101 Yoga LAB TR 9:00-9:50 AM Mr. Christian Barnes 2 Physical Activity and Wellness
  Yoga LECTURE W 11:00-11:50 AM Ms. Marsha Todd 1 Physical Activity and Wellness
PSY 105 General Psychology TR 11 AM-12:15 PM Ms. Elaine Hogan 3 Understanding Human Institutions & Behaviors
UNI 101 First Year Seminar MW 1:00-2:15 PM Ms. Leah Colvin 3 Foundations

Description

How can we achieve balance in our lives? What can we do to enhance our health in every aspect; mind, body, and spirit? How does our environment influence our choices? How can we develop behaviors that will serve us well as we age? This Learning Community seeks answers to these questions and many more through the combination of General Psychology (PSY 105) and Physical Activity and Wellness (PED 101) with a concentration on Hatha Yoga techniques. In the PED 101 class, students will receive an introduction to the various aspects of Yoga, including Hatha Yoga postures, breathing techniques and deep relaxation. They will also develop their skills as informed health consumers and engage in the application of healthy choices regarding fitness, nutrition, personal safety, stress management, and weight management for the purpose of wellness, chronic disease prevention and improved quality of life. In PSY 105, students will be provided a sampling of the major subject areas of psychology, with an emphasis on the general principles and methods of psychological study. It is hoped that, as they explore the wide range of psychological research and learn the disciplines of yoga, students will increase their own self-awareness and their understanding of the determinants of their own behavior.
*You cannot choose this as an option if you have taken (and scored a 3 or better on AP or a 5 or better on IB HL) or plan to take the AP or IB HL exam for Psychology or are transferring in credit for an introductory Psychology course or a Physical Activity and Wellness course.

7. Syntax & Salsa: Fusion of Composition & Dance

Courses:

Course
Title
Days
Time
Instructor
Hours
Course Description
ENG 100 Composition TR 9:30-10:45 AM Ms. Michelle Britt 3 College Writing and Reading I Global Emphasis
PED 101 Yoga LAB WF 12:00-12:50 PM Dr. Alexia Franzidis 2 Physical Activity and Wellness
  Yoga LECTURE M 9:00-9:50 AM Dr. Lynn Long 3 Physical Activity and Wellness
UNI 101 First Year Seminar TR 11 AM-12:15 PM Mr. Zack Underwood 3 Foundations

Description

Would you like to learn about cultures of the world through reading, writing and fun-oriented environments? Are you interested in a fast-moving and teamwork-oriented workout? The worlds of English composition and salsa dancing are fused in this community to form a group of individuals interested in growing as global citizens. Participants will learn basic Spanish terms and will explore physical education or dancing across multiple cultures. This learning community may also involve a service-oriented fall break trip required for all participants. Join us for a cardiovascular and academically focused community like no other! No previous dancing experience needed!
*You cannot choose this as an option if you have taken (and scored a 3 or better on AP or 6 or better on IB HL) or plan to take the AP or IB HL exam for either English Language or English Literature or are transferring in credit for an English composition course. This is also not an option if you had high verbal scores on your SAT (610 or higher) or ACT (28 or higher).

8. What Makes Hansel & Gretel Tick? Examination through the Lenses of Psychology and Literature

Courses:

Course
Title
Days
Time
Instructor
Hours
Course Description
GER 209 German Literature in Translation MWF 9:00-9:50 AM Dr. Raymond Burt 3 Aesthetic, Interpretive, & Literary Perspectives
PSY 105 General Psychology MWF 10:00-10:50 AM Dr. Carrie Clements 3 Understanding Human Institutions & Behaviors   
UNI 101 First Year Seminar TR 11 AM-12:15 PM Ms. Carly Wilson 3 Foundations

Description

As a learning community we will explore the depths of the human soul as expressed in great works of German literature (translated in English, no need to know German) with a solid foundation of human psychology. The science of human behavior originated in Germany, and so what would be better for exploring the foundations of this science as illustrated in the literature of the times. You will explore topics in psychology ranging from brain physiology and genetics to psychotherapy and gain a breadth of knowledge about literature from Germany, Austria and Switzerland which has influenced all of Western culture. Psychologists and psychoanalysts were influenced by the intellectual currents and culture found in the literature, and additionally, we can apply psychological interpretations to these great works. Common themes include the individual & society, the mind and creativity, madness (E.T.A. Hoffman), motivation, subconscious (Kafka), perception (Hesse) development (Handke), social behavior (Schnitzler) , biological bases for behavior (Woyzeck), reactions to fear, rage, & arousal(Jelenik).
*You cannot choose this as an option if you have taken (and scored a 3 or better on AP or a 5 or better on IB HL) or plan to take the AP or IB HL exam for Psychology.


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