Graduate English Association

Promoting a community of academic growth among English graduate students. This group supports individual and group creative and scholarly pursuits, both inside and outside the classroom.

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Graduate School Forms

Forms for international students, certification, registration and requests for travel and other activities.

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Independent study

The link here will open a pdf form to apply for a Graduate/Independent Study opportunity.

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Graduation Information for graduate students

Find out details of applying to graduate, along with a checklist and dates and deadlines.

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Travel

The following are the two forms graduate students should look over if they are looking to be reimbursed for travel.


Table TH

Event Name

Date here

Event Name

Date here

Graduate Course Descriptions

Spring 2015

 

503-002
Theory and Practice Teaching Composition
Sarah Hallenbeck
T 6:30-9:15
MO 204
The renowned writing teacher and columnist Donald Murray once lamented that he was apprenticed to two crafts he could never master: writing and teaching. In this class we’ll consider Murray’s words both as they relate to each of his crafts separately and as they ring true in combination, when one takes on the challenge of teaching first year composition (FYC). In addition to mapping out the history of composition studies and identifying its primary thematic approaches, we’ll explore what happens at the intersection of theory and practice, familiarize ourselves with resources available for writing teachers, and develop course materials useful for teaching composition at the university or community college level.   Text: Tate, Rupiper, Schick, and Hessler, A Guide to Composition Pedagogies, second edition; selected articles

508-001
Studies in Nonfiction: Writing about Science
Colleen Reilly

M 6:30–9:15
MO 204

Reading and analyzing excellent writing about scientific information enriches our understanding of some of the most exciting technical innovations and environmental phenomena happening in our time. Furthermore, writing clearly and engagingly about science for nonscientific audiences is important for students of science as well as aspiring journalists and nonfiction writers. During this course, students will read and discuss some of the best science writing published recently while working to improve their own writing about scientific information for a range of audiences. Students will develop their writing using the genres most relevant to their fields of study and/or area of interest, including marine biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, medicine, psychology, and technology. They will also refine their primary and secondary research strategies, which are essential for writing in and about all areas of science.

This course is chiefly concerned with speculating on some of the ways in which Shakespeare may have responded to the works of others, especially Chaucer, Montaigne, the Bible, and The Book of Common Prayer. We will investigate cases of obvious verbal “borrowing” by Shakespeare as well as larger questions like the ways in which Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde stimulated Shakespeare to create Troilus and Cressida and the ways in which Montaigne’s comments on cruelty inform the treatment of revenge in The Tempest. As time permits, we will consider some later authors’ appropriations of Shakespeare. Graduate requirements: oral presentation; annotated bibliography of ten items; short response papers; critical paper of 4500-5000 words. Undergraduate requirements: oral presentation; short response papers; critical paper of 2000-2500 words; midterm and final exams

509-002
Topics in Literature: Intertextual Shakespeare
Lewis Walker
T 3:30-6:15
MO 102
This course is chiefly concerned with speculating on some of the ways in which Shakespeare may have responded to the works of others, especially Chaucer, Montaigne, the Bible, and The Book of Common Prayer. We will investigate cases of obvious verbal “borrowing” by Shakespeare as well as larger questions like the ways in which Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde stimulated Shakespeare to create Troilus and Cressida and the ways in which Montaigne’s comments on cruelty inform the treatment of revenge in The Tempest. As time permits, we will consider some later authors’ appropriations of Shakespeare. Graduate requirements: oral presentation; annotated bibliography of ten items; short response papers; critical paper of 4500-5000 words. Undergraduate requirements: oral presentation; short response papers; critical paper of 2000-2500 words; midterm and final exams.  Texts include:  Chaucer. The Canterbury Tales; Chaucer. The Riverside Chaucer; Chaucer. Troilus and Criseyde; Montaigne. The Essays: A Selection. Shakespeare. The Complete Works of Shakespeare.

556-001
Qualitative Research in English Studies
Victor Malo
W 6:30-9:15
MO 202
This course will provide a practical and theoretical introduction to qualitative research with a focus on research design and ethical issues.  Students will be introduced to how qualitative research fits into the research continuum and will be familiarized with various types of qualitative methods with an emphasis on reading published qualitative research articles that focus on subjects of interest to scholars of English.  A major part of this class will be practical as students will gain experience conducting interviews and coding data.  Students are expected to exit this class with an original qualitative research article suitable for submission for presentation or publication.

560-001
Topics in British Literature: The Mary Shelley Circle
Katherine Montwieler
R 3:30-6:15
MO 202
At eighteen years old, Mary Shelley penned one of the most enduring novels and parables of Western civilization, Frankenstein.  She continued to write novels and literary criticism well into the Victorian era, though her later work paled in popularity to her first novel, which has been in continuous print since 1818.  This class will immerse itself in the work of the Shelley circle, a coterie of brilliant and infamous intellectuals and artists that spanned two generations at the dawn of the nineteenth century.  We’ll read Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, Percy Shelley, and Lord Byron, and Shelley herself will be the linchpin of the class as we study these writers in the context of the age of revolution.

564-003
Studies in Children¹s and YA Literature: Fiction into Film
Meghan Sweeney
W 3:30-6:15
MO 102
The fiction and films of childhood and adolescence evoke powerful responses that are often tinged with nostalgic longing. In this class, you will have a chance to revisit, as critically aware graduate students, familiar novels and their filmic adaptations as well as be exposed to some unusual or avant-garde texts. Together we will pay careful attention to the formal features of films, explore theories of childhood and adaptation, and address the gritty realities of critical and popular reception.

 


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